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>> No. 22558 Anonymous
5th February 2019
Tuesday 1:48 am
22558 Star Ratings on Netflix
I've used Netflix plenty in the past, but up until recently I'd simply piggy backed off other people's accounts.

For anyone who doesn't know, when you first open your Netflix account it asks you to choose three programmes you've enjoyed previously to currate your experience and what have you. So obviously, being who I am I didn't choose any and I proceded regardless. This evening I was flicking about, not having watched anything, yet, and I saw that Annilation had just a smidge under three stars, which I thought wasn't very fair given how much I'd liked it. I watched the film Arrival not long after,this. I thought it was very good, gave it five out of five stars and had another look around. While looking around I came across Annilation again, only this time it had also had a five star rating! Meaning, not only are the shows and films you're reccommended currated, so are the star ratings attached to them.

I don't know if this is common knowledge, but I found it troubling upon learing that this is the case. I know it doesn't sound like much, but just the idea that two people looking at the same listings on Netflix are seeing slightly different realities does not sit right with me. What if you brought this up in public, or on Twitter? What if Amazon or some other company that sells and/or delivers physical products were to do this? There are people who immediately watched Star Trek or something elses sci-fi related who think the rest of the populace think Annilation is dead good, when it actual fact they thought it was just alright, or do they?! We can't rely on Netflix to tell us, in either case.
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>> No. 22559 Anonymous
5th February 2019
Tuesday 1:58 am
22559 spacer
This is old news. Even the thumbnails you get for the same titles will be different depending on what Netflix knows about you. For example, with horror movies, men get thumbnails of attractive women running away from the danger whilst women get thumbnails of groups of people emotionally bonding over their mutual fear of whatever the threat is. For the same film. To get you and your missus to both click on the same link, it is marketed entirely differently based upon what they guess about you.
>> No. 22560 Anonymous
5th February 2019
Tuesday 2:45 am
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>>22559

It's all a bit of a shell game to disguise how thin their catalogue is. They don't want you to search for stuff, because you'd realise that they don't actually have very much; their clever algorithms allow them to make what little content they do have seem more impressive.

>>22558

>What if Amazon or some other company that sells and/or delivers physical products were to do this?

A lot of online retailers offer the same product at different prices, depending on their analytics data. If you're using a Mac, they might assume that you're minted and charge more; if you usually take a while between looking at a product and adding it to the cart, they might assume that you normally compare prices and charge you less.

https://www.theatlantic.com/magazine/archive/2017/05/how-online-shopping-makes-suckers-of-us-all/521448/
>> No. 22561 Anonymous
5th February 2019
Tuesday 8:42 am
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I only found out recently that people using Netflix had no fucking idea what the star ratings meant and are talking about it like it's a huge conspiracy. I knew from the moment I signed up because, y'know, I paid attention to the instructions I was given about how the service works.

It boggles my mind that it is a major news story that people don't know how to use the service they are paying for or didn't bother to find out, and it's utterly infuriating that they are phasing out the star ratings as a result, because I always found them reasonably useful.
>> No. 22563 Anonymous
5th February 2019
Tuesday 1:03 pm
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>>22561
Are they still using star ratings? Mine just straight up gives a percentage match.

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