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>> No. 20782 Anonymous
23rd December 2019
Monday 1:14 pm
20782 Advanced driver assistance systems are making us all bad drivers
https://www.zdnet.com/article/uh-oh-advanced-driver-assistance-systems-are-making-us-all-bad-drivers/


Advanced driver assistance systems are becoming on the norm even on midlevel cars. For safety advocates that seems like good news: Systems designed to prevent crashes should, after all, result in fewer crashes.

But what if that thinking is flawed? A new report from AAA suggests that might be the case and that our increasing use of driver assistance systems may actually be resulting in higher rates of distracted driving.
Expand all images.
>> No. 20784 Anonymous
23rd December 2019
Monday 1:35 pm
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I believe it.

I've always been shocked at how cavalier Yanks are about using their phones when they drive, and I'm convinced it's as simple as the fact that they all drive automatics. It's easy to get complacent when it really is as simple as operating a bumper car, where you just point it in the direction you want and push a pedal. Plus all their roads are just straight lines.

I wouldn't be surprised if this is a similar sort of thing.
>> No. 20785 Anonymous
23rd December 2019
Monday 3:45 pm
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>>20784

>I've always been shocked at how cavalier Yanks are about using their phones when they drive, and I'm convinced it's as simple as the fact that they all drive automatics.


That, and they just generally don't care.

I guess when you make it such a piece of piss to get your driving licence, there is no incentive to be a good driver.

Might also explain why car insurance is so astronomically high stateside. You hear stories of people paying over $150 a month even if they are experienced and low-risk drivers.
>> No. 20786 Anonymous
23rd December 2019
Monday 5:07 pm
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Shouldn't this be common sense after the Hans Monderman innovation where taking down roadsigns led to a fall in accidents.

Why didn't we listen to Rush? Or at least emulate the dystopia with cars that can survive anything rather than just avoid damage.

http://www.2112.net/xanadu/articles/a_nice_morning_drive.htm
>> No. 20789 Anonymous
23rd December 2019
Monday 5:59 pm
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Maybe it's just because I'm a young(ish) lad who has owned classic cars, but I thought this was obvious. The difference in awareness even for me, between driving an early 90s jap sports car and a drive by wire modern luxury car is ridiculous. In the latter I don't even 'need' to stay fully conscious doing 90mph on the motorway, as the car will stay in the lane for me. After feeling the contrast between my bells and whistles 4x4 and, at the time, my Mk2 MR2, which is a car that demands complete attention, I turned off most of the 'driver assist' features in the modern car because I realised how much worse I was at being a road user with them on. And of course and cyclist or motorcyclist can tell you that even the most basic car robs you of a certain level of awareness, since most minor mistakes don't involve you ended up picking gravel out of your skin in a car.

I'd say beyond all the technological advances, the most significant safety feature of most modern mass market cars is the shift to front engine, front wheel drive. You can chuck your hot hatch around just about any corner and only ever have to deal with understeer, and that can be remedied by braking and your car's computer anyway. Then people buy a BMW and have no idea the back end is going to go out on them if they drive it like their old Corsa and end up, if they're lucky, facing the wrong way in traffic when they try to take a corner they think they can take. I suppose that's not really the same thing as driver aids, but whenever I see a wrecked fast/sports car that's clearly taken a bad corner it's a RWD.
>> No. 20847 Anonymous
4th January 2020
Saturday 1:30 pm
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>>20789

> but whenever I see a wrecked fast/sports car that's clearly taken a bad corner it's a RWD.

Also, you have to factor in that many true sports cars have a mid- or even a rear engine combined with RWD. While it makes for near-ideal weight distribution and lets you corner like a Formula 1 racer, it isn't the best layout in terms of stability.

If you take cars like the MG F or TF, not "true" sports cars, I know, but mid engined nonetheless, they're loads of fun to drive for sheer agility, but if you push your luck around a bend with barely a drop of water on the road, it's going to turn into a carousel ride. I used to have an 03 reg TF, and when I still had it relatively new, one day I was going around a curve in city traffic and there was a moist patch on the road surface, not wet, just moist, but it was enough for the rear of the car to break out completely without warning and me ending up doing a 180. Luckily, this was on a Sunday morning and there weren't many other cars around, but you get the picture. And having a 400hp mid-engined RWD car like a Ferrari or Lamborghini isn't going to make going around a tight bend at break-neck speed much less dangerous. I think that's what many people underestimate about the mid engine layout. You can corner at quite daring speeds, but it's hard to judge without proper experience at which point things get dangerous and you run the risk of spinning out.
>> No. 20849 Anonymous
4th January 2020
Saturday 2:05 pm
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>>20847

>Also, you have to factor in that many true sports cars have a mid- or even a rear engine combined with RWD.

Back in the '80s, the Porsche 911 had a terrible reputation as a widowmaker - an unwary driver just needed to carry a little bit too much speed into a roundabout and they went arse-first into a ditch.

In this respect, I will defend driver aids. Modern cars with ABS and DSC are incredibly stable, to the point that they really won't let you lose traction. The vast majority of drivers just don't have the skills to modulate their braking effort during an emergency stop or countersteer out of a skid, so I don't see the harm in providing an electronic safety net to prevent an unsalvageable four-wheel lock-up.
>> No. 20850 Anonymous
4th January 2020
Saturday 2:26 pm
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How can they make me a bad driver when I don't even drive? Idiot.
>> No. 20851 Anonymous
4th January 2020
Saturday 4:59 pm
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>>20849

>Back in the '80s, the Porsche 911 had a terrible reputation as a widowmaker

Even before that, the 1973-onward 911 turbo was notoriously difficult to drive, partly because of its rear engine RWD platform, but also due to its turbo charger which had a huge turbo lag, which meant you pretty much always had to go at near-full throttle to keep it happy. Which is not something an inexperienced driver could handle well on public roads.

And then the Audi quattro S1 from the heyday of down-and-dirty Group B rallying was a similar death trap, it did have a top heavy, cast iron five-cylinder turbo engine which meant very pronounced understeer, but it, too, was not a car that was for beginners, neither on the rallying circuit, nor on public roads in its homologated incarnation as the Audi Urquattro.

Back then, cars like that really commanded the skill of a seasoned sports car or GT driver even in everyday use, but when you look at cars like the Audi R8 today, they come with a vast array of assistance systems that mean even the discerning corporate lawyer who's late for work doesn't run much of a risk of wrecking it on his morning commute.

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