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201952019520195
>> No. 20195 Anonymous
16th September 2019
Monday 1:25 pm
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This is just sounded so incredible I had to post it. According to this the NHS defines a 'never event' as mistakes "so serious they should never happen".

They happened 621 times in the past year.

I know the NHS is being failed, but fucking hell.

https://www.huffingtonpost.co.uk/entry/nhs-never-events-patients-wrong-body-part-amputated_uk_5d7f50d5e4b03b5fc88656b6
Expand all images.
>> No. 20196 Anonymous
16th September 2019
Monday 1:30 pm
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>the NHS is being failed

Or the NHS is failing. I assume your solution is to give it a lot more money, which it has a wonderful track record of not wasting on administration.
>> No. 20197 Anonymous
16th September 2019
Monday 1:45 pm
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>>20196
Assume away. I'll make my own assumption: you aren't mentioning your own solution because you either don't have one or it's shite.
>> No. 20198 Anonymous
16th September 2019
Monday 1:46 pm
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>>20196
Daily Mail comments section is that way, m9.
>> No. 20201 Anonymous
16th September 2019
Monday 5:25 pm
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Or the NHS is not failing at all, and defining never events and reporting on them is part of an effective system to report, monitor, and identify the failure of policies/procedures that enabled them to happen in the first place?

621 is not a big number compared to the hundreds of thousands of operations the NHS carries out every year. You might want to compare that to some other first world healthcare systems if you want some perspective- Although you might struggle, because most of them don't actually keep tabs on it like the NHS does.

Sara C Nelson wants to be ashamed of herself, because this is some properly shit "journalism". This is not some scandalous scoop, this is literally freely available information the NHS publishes and has done for many years, which she has tried to sensationalise for a rag like Huff Po.

Stop being a fuckwit.
>> No. 20204 Anonymous
16th September 2019
Monday 6:41 pm
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>>20201
Completely agree. Context is important.

I know where we are posting, but I would have thought that even here we'd be aware of sensationalist drivel.

Think of the obscene amount of procedures happening in the NHS not just yearly, but every single day. 621, less than 2 a day, across every single hospital, GP surgery and related place.
>> No. 20205 Anonymous
16th September 2019
Monday 6:49 pm
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>>20195

It's no surprise an American oriented news source is accusing the NHS of failing, their fear of socialist medicine (whatever that is) is engrained by commercial interests
>> No. 20206 Anonymous
16th September 2019
Monday 7:44 pm
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OK lads, so maybe this stuff happens a lot more regularly than the article implies, I'll give you that.

But then isn't it incredibly misleading for them to be called 'never events'? The idea that something should never happen, to me, suggests a distinction from a mere serious failure. A never event sounds like it is on the level of triggering a public inquiry.
>> No. 20208 Anonymous
16th September 2019
Monday 8:17 pm
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>>20206
Did you know that the chicken you buy in KFC isn't actually fried in Kentucky?
>> No. 20209 Anonymous
16th September 2019
Monday 8:24 pm
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>>20195
I am reminded of my work place's change to reporting a hazard. To having a "good catch". They are both the same thing, but they've obviously got some expensive PR firm to think of the changes in name. This has brought about a minor change in the reporting process and a big update to the network system, to accommodate this change.

All of this has just made reporting a hazard just that little more obtuse than it was before. That one tiny step just makes it so much more annoying and seems to have dropped the amount of hazards being reported. It's almost as if they don't want someone to report them.
>> No. 20210 Anonymous
16th September 2019
Monday 8:27 pm
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>>20208
Yes.
>> No. 20211 Anonymous
16th September 2019
Monday 8:35 pm
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>>20210
Isn't it incredibly misleading?
>> No. 20212 Anonymous
16th September 2019
Monday 8:41 pm
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>>20206

>The idea that something should never happen, to me, suggests a distinction from a mere serious failure

That, surely, is the point of them calling it that. A serious mistake requires a serious response. If the exact same "never event" happened 600 times a year, you'd have a point, but the idea is, presumably, that once an event this bad happens, they take further steps to ensure it is not repeated.
>> No. 20214 Anonymous
16th September 2019
Monday 9:28 pm
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>>20212

This is precisely the point.

Plenty of them are down to good old human error. Stuff like putting the wrong sort of drugs in the wrong IV. These things can kill a person, so of course they are "never events", but it's the sort of thing a tired nurse on the 11th hour of her shift is understandably more likely to do- You absent mindedly put the syringe in the red one instead of the blue and oh shit I have to press the crash alarm.

It's a focus on minimising the possibility for that human error mostly, and healthcare by its very nature involves a lot of room for human error. What other business has even the possibility of such catastrophic mishaps? When Amazon invariably cocks up one day and leaks everyone on the planet's credit card information to ISIS, that will be a never event. But it doesn't quite provoke the same feeling of alarm as a bloke mistakenly getting his knob chopped off when he went in for a circumcision.
>> No. 20223 Anonymous
17th September 2019
Tuesday 12:31 am
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>>20211
No.

>>20212
>the idea is, presumably, that once an event this bad happens, they take further steps to ensure it is not repeated
But evidently, they are repeated. Not least because as the above poster points out they can partly be attributed to human error, one of the least controllable risk factors. So they shouldn't be called that if despite being preventable they are so blatantly inevitable.

Airlines don't call crashes "never events". Even Chernobyl wasn't called a "never event", even though it was damn sure on that scale.
>> No. 20224 Anonymous
17th September 2019
Tuesday 12:47 am
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>>20223

>Airlines don't call crashes "never events".

And yet, the aviation industry likely tries quite hard to avoid these events, and though there were about 600 deaths due to commercial airliner crashes last year, you're not posting a thread about how incompetent the aviation industry is.

It seems now you're just annoyed by the phrase they use, and still failing to understand that the goal is to classify the most pressing set of preventable and teachable mistakes.


If it helps you, try to understand that "never event" is a catchphrase used to describe the most serious level of error, and not a self defeating literal description. Again, they want these events to never happen. The goal is that they never happen.

Does that make sense?
>> No. 20226 Anonymous
17th September 2019
Tuesday 1:35 am
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In fairness to sensationalistlad whoever is in charge of naming things in the NHS is pretty poor at it. We have some sort of IT system for midwives called Badgernet. No idea what that's about.
>> No. 20227 Anonymous
17th September 2019
Tuesday 4:10 am
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>>20226
In Wales they decided to rename everything to start with W. In some cases this was just "National" becoming "Welsh", in others "Welsh" got tagged on the beginning. Then there were a couple of things that were completely renamed, some of which stuck and others didn't. The system formerly known as Merlin is still called Merlin by everyone who isn't a Merlin project manager.
>> No. 20238 Anonymous
17th September 2019
Tuesday 11:59 am
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>>20226
> We have some sort of IT system for midwives called Badgernet.
Prolly a reference to an old joke about a pregnancy test.
>> No. 20242 Anonymous
17th September 2019
Tuesday 5:17 pm
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>>20226
BadgerNet is software named and written by a private sector company.
>> No. 20243 Anonymous
17th September 2019
Tuesday 7:58 pm
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>>20224
>The goal is that they never happen.
Unlike all those other, lesser mistakes that they are perfectly OK to let happen?
>> No. 20246 Anonymous
17th September 2019
Tuesday 8:18 pm
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>>20243
Let's hope they don't make a mistake while removing that stick from your arse, eh lad?
>> No. 20248 Anonymous
17th September 2019
Tuesday 8:39 pm
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>>20243

How do you still not understand this?

Have you not ever had a job with a company big enough to have HR and safety reporting?

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