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>> No. 3130 Anonymous
30th January 2013
Wednesday 11:21 am
3130 Smart Cities
So, Glasgow has won a £24 million grant from the UK's Technology Strategy Board to become Britain's first "smart city".

http://www.wired.co.uk/news/archive/2013-01/27/glasgow-smart-city

What do you lads think of this? On the one hand, I can see the benefits, since Glasgow "has the lowest life expectancy of any city in the UK", but wonder what life would be like if this spread to every other city, as I can't imagine everyone being ok with certain aspects a smart city would have. I feel like the people of the city should have a say as well, assuming they haven't, as:

"Fitting up a city with technology that allows better monitoring of lifestyle and life standards, and helping the administrators make their decisions in light of that"

Made me feel a little uneasy about the whole thing. Though apparently they've tested this in cities in the US and liked what they've seen.
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>> No. 3145 Anonymous
2nd February 2013
Saturday 3:43 pm
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>>3130

>They're going to make the city better by rolling out more big brother projects rather than helping people. The UK makes me sick to my stomach, to this once great country beat the Nazis and now has big brother the gestapo could never even wet dream of!

Well, I guess this guy isn't interested in "real-time traffic information, apps to check when buses and trains are arriving, and a pothole reporting service" but I've wished for each of those things before.
>> No. 3146 Anonymous
2nd February 2013
Saturday 5:13 pm
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>>3145
Those useful city apps are only relevant for as long as you have decent data to use them - which is a push at the best of times. That said, if they're going to make it into a smart city then I suppose they could have city-wide WiFi and add it onto council tax but that could end up being a bit steep.
>> No. 3147 Anonymous
5th February 2013
Tuesday 5:40 pm
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>>3130

The 'smart city' is a slick marketing term. In reality, it is a hugely expensive, bureaucratic affair - why not invest the money into making sure busses run on time - rather than having data about how much they aren't running on time, or pay one more person to manage pot-hole complaints and repair.

From my perspective, the rush to answer every question with "technology! Monitoring!" is mostly a honeyed lie from companies looking for lucrative long term contracts where most of the running costs can be outsourced to foreign offices - and the idea of 'big brother' is laughable, as the systems that really matter for that have largely been in place since the 70-80s.
>> No. 3148 Anonymous
5th February 2013
Tuesday 7:26 pm
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>>3147
"the first essential step in the direction of learning any subject is to find principles of numerical reckoning and practicable methods for measuring some quality connected with it. I often say that when you can measure what you are speaking about, and express it in numbers, you know something about it; but when you cannot measure it, when you cannot express it in numbers, your knowledge is of a meagre and unsatisfactory kind; it may be the beginning of knowledge, but you have scarcely in your thoughts advanced to the state of Science, whatever the matter may be"
>> No. 3149 Anonymous
5th February 2013
Tuesday 10:12 pm
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>>3147
>why not invest the money into making sure busses run on time - rather than having data about how much they aren't running on time
It turns out you really can't do the former without the latter.
>> No. 3177 Anonymous
21st February 2013
Thursday 1:58 pm
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>>3148 Right. Your point being, I guess, a round-the-houses version of >>3149?

>>3149 How does having the data about when bus stops at 'x ' and then at 'y' tell you why it stopped?
In fact this is also a rebuke for >>3148 - stop being so rational, there are some things you cannot solve with the application of science; in this case the reason buses get delayed. Sure, you can break things down into variables (time bus is stopped, amount of unforeseen stops etc) and break those variables down (why bus is stopped, how long individual reasons are/number of stops on a tuesday rush hour etc), but once you try to interrelate all these 'numbers' you could have just spent the money getting another bus.
>> No. 3178 Anonymous
21st February 2013
Thursday 2:17 pm
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>>3177

But...but...but...then how would we justify paying KPMG 3 grand a day per consultant to analyse our bus routes and after several months decide that the best thing is to *reduce* the number of buses?
>> No. 3179 Anonymous
21st February 2013
Thursday 2:29 pm
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>>3177
>How does having the data about when bus stops at 'x ' and then at 'y' tell you why it stopped?
In most cases, very obviously.

>there are some things you cannot solve with the application of science; in this case the reason buses get delayed
u wot m8?

>but once you try to interrelate all these 'numbers' you could have just spent the money getting another bus.
True, you could just buy another bus, but then you'd have two problems. Now, your buses are constantly getting delayed, and you need to change your duty patterns to fit an extra bus in.

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