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>> No. 12418 Anonymous
16th July 2018
Monday 5:05 pm
12418 Merchant Navy
Hi Lads, cadet from the travel-working thread here - I think the MN might be an interesting topic to discuss, especially as some other lads have questions.

I can only speak from the perspective of someone starting a cadetship, so can't contribute much, other than my agreement at the poster saying that it seems to be a good way out for someone without qualifications but a willingness to do the graft.
Expand all images.
>> No. 12420 Anonymous
16th July 2018
Monday 7:31 pm
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Can you do it at 30 years old?
>> No. 12421 Anonymous
16th July 2018
Monday 8:21 pm
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>>12420

The lads from my training company have said that they've had cadets well into their 40s (The oldest successful cadet being in his 50s at the time of starting), and that that sometimes sponsoring companies can see it as an advantage, in that a bit of experience in the real world can go a long way.

Much the same as universities expecting a willingness to learn and set examples for the younger students, I'd expect.
>> No. 12422 Anonymous
16th July 2018
Monday 9:19 pm
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I finished my cadetship nine years ago. I would've recommended it to anyone around then, but it can be a tough job market these days. If you're going to do a cadetship, I'd recommend the engineering route over deck, and if you're going to do a deck cadetship, try to get sponsored on an oil, gas, or chemical tanker, or some kind of DP ship like supply ships. Having specialised tickets from those ships will make it MUCH easier to get and keep a better paid job. Straight cargo is not recommended. Standby is okay, the pay is actually pretty good, but it can be a dead end career.
>> No. 12430 Anonymous
17th July 2018
Tuesday 9:06 pm
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>>12422

Got any stories about cruise work? I've heard it can be low pay and the 4months on, 2 off ratio can become a bit gruelling. I wonder if the amenities really make up for it.
>> No. 12431 Anonymous
18th July 2018
Wednesday 1:48 am
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>>12430

I've never worked on cruise ships but you're right. They don't sound like my cup of tea but I've heard they can be a good laugh. Tiny cabins, low pay, putting up with guests, long trips, and from what I hear surprisingly unprofessional. Plus junior bridge officers are basically just radar operators. You won't have many duties, so there's lots you won't learn. If you get a job on a standby boat, you'll be in charge of a bridge watch (not understudying) and you'll be doing the chart work and you'll be doing the safety checks, so you'll learn a lot faster.

If you work on a cruise ship, you'll have the opportunity to get pissed up and you'll meet some top international strange. So it's your choice.
>> No. 12433 Anonymous
19th July 2018
Thursday 4:56 pm
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>>12431
I recall reading from a former cruise line employee that the underlings always have their own semi-official bar buried deep in the bowels of the ship that as a passenger you will never, ever be allowed to enter and it's basically a crazed, gin-soaked, all-hours bacchanalia. He evinced surprised that anyone was ever sober enough to do their job.
>> No. 12434 Anonymous
19th July 2018
Thursday 8:12 pm
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>>12433

weyyyyyy
>> No. 13183 Anonymous
2nd July 2019
Tuesday 11:21 pm
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This is an old post - OP here, I have returned from my first trip.

>>12433, you are absolutely correct.

I really loved it, and can't wait to get back to it. I really can't recommend it enough.
>> No. 13201 Anonymous
18th July 2019
Thursday 1:37 pm
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>>13183
How was it?
>> No. 13202 Anonymous
18th July 2019
Thursday 6:50 pm
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>>13201

He really loved it, can't wait to get back to it. He really can't recommend it enough.
>> No. 13205 Anonymous
19th July 2019
Friday 3:57 pm
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Fuck it this thread popped back up at the right time in my life. Is a complete contempt for society and my personal relationships a good enough reason to sign up. Or is there some sort of psychology test I'm likely to fail because I'm too close to the edge and they think I'll go feral.

Is it possible to get involved in navigation whilst on ship or would I need to have done some sort of classes first. I think I'd be happier doing some sort of analysis over something physical or customer facing you see.
>> No. 13208 Anonymous
19th July 2019
Friday 11:14 pm
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>>13205

The barriers for entry are ridiculously low depending on who you go with. There are only two big employers I know who do any psychometric testing, one of whom is the RFA, which supplies the royal navy.

A cadetship takes about 3 years, 1.5 of which are onboard. At the start you can specialise in navigation/ship operations or two types of engineering (electrical/mechanical).

Once you qualify you'll be in a position of responsibility, but on cruise ships senior officers are sometimes expected to mingle with the guests, but if you're religious about staying away from the guests it won't be a hassle.

Although I will say, if you're having trouble with personal relationships with other people it might not be for you, as you are working and living with the same people for month on end. Food for thought.
>> No. 13209 Anonymous
20th July 2019
Saturday 4:55 pm
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>>13208

Hmm

I'd rather be onboard ship asap, as that cuts out a bunch of other expenses in my life.

What is the pay like for roles I could fill immediately without specialised skills? or I might be able to fill with transfered office worker skills and be at sea within the space of about a month.
>> No. 13210 Anonymous
20th July 2019
Saturday 6:22 pm
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But what do you actually do, day to day, I mean?
>> No. 13211 Anonymous
20th July 2019
Saturday 6:46 pm
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>>13209

To be honest mate if you've come straight from a 9-5 without an engineering qualification you'd really struggle to find a place. Most of the work for british people is generally on cruise ships, and the roles you are referring to are usually filled by Filipinos or Indonesians.

Your best bet otherwise is literally to go down a marina with copies of your CV and a sincere work ethic, where you might get work as a deck rating, the pay for which will be very good but the work rotations are gruelling (9+ months on).

>>13210

For me, my day-to-day (as a cadet, mind) is to shadow the people in the position I'll eventually be filling.

That position, though, is one which is in charge of looking after the ship's power generation systems, navigation equipment and other electrical systems on board. Usually it's day-to-day maintenance, IR testing of aspects of the generator, servicing and overhauling of equipment. There's lots of little faffy jobs on cruise as well, for instance I spent a lot of time looking after the on-board telecoms, installing and servicing emergency buttons, things like that.

Hope that helps.

Shifts are 12 hours, 7 days a week, plus 2 nights a week of being on-call if there's an emergency.
>> No. 13212 Anonymous
20th July 2019
Saturday 7:41 pm
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>>13210
Vigorous bumming.
>> No. 13213 Anonymous
20th July 2019
Saturday 8:57 pm
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>>13212
I'd like to shadow the people in the position I'll eventually be filling IYKWIM.
>> No. 13229 Anonymous
22nd July 2019
Monday 9:10 pm
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Join the Merchant Navy they said, it's great they said, you definitely won't get held hostage by the Iranians they said.
>> No. 13230 Anonymous
28th July 2019
Sunday 9:29 pm
13230 Thanks lads!
Joined up as a result of this thread. Just got back from Afghanistan today. What an experience.
>> No. 13231 Anonymous
28th July 2019
Sunday 10:48 pm
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>>13230
Landlocked Afghanistan?

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