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>> No. 4831 Anonymous
19th October 2019
Saturday 1:51 am
4831 Aliens
The Area 51 thing was a massive wet fart, but it got me nostalgic for the old days where it wasn't all about chemtrails, Jews being behind 9/11, and flat-earth nonsense. Back then it was believable, grounded stuff like flying saucers and men in black. So let's talk about aliens.

Do you believe in aliens? Do you believe we are visited by aliens? Have you ever seen or encountered any aliens? Does the government know about aliens but cover it up? Did aliens visit and influence our ancestors in the past? Are aliens friendly, benign, or threatening?

Aliens are a very compelling subject. Why is the classic description of a grey so fundamentally creepy? Why have aliens and the things that surround them, UFOs, men in black, become such an ingrained part of modern folklore? Why have they fallen into the background in modern times, to be replaced with anti-intellectual/anti-science conspiracy theories for home schooling bible-bashing wierdos? Is this paradigm shift representative of the cultural era we have moved into?

Aliens.
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>> No. 4832 Anonymous
19th October 2019
Saturday 10:41 am
4832 spacer
I'll get the boring perspective out of the way: statistically speaking, other forms of life must exist, just in terms of raw numbers and the sheer scale of the universe. No, I don't believe we have been visited or contacted by these. "Ancient aliens" narratives remind me of theology, in the sense that we explain things with a powerful external force rather than make sense the complex reality.

I also disagree with your idea that beliefs about flying saucers or men in black were somehow better, or that older /boo/-type theories were generally more sensible in the past.

To take things meta-/boo/, I do genuinely think that a lot of what are called "conspiracy theories" are encouraged by military and security agencies to distract from issues which pose a genuine threat, or expose real agendas. I wish I could find it, but I'm sure I've read somewhere that the FBI encouraged rampant speculation about the JFK assassination and UFOs in the 1960s to draw attention away from Cointelpro -- a true conspiracy involving propaganda and outright murder of U.S. citizens.

It may be tempting to believe that there are grand and surprising truths being hidden somewhere, but the primary concern of "intelligence" agencies is the preservation of power. One way of doing that is to encourage outlandish and cultish behaviours -- even better if they're presented as forbidden knowledge only the privileged few or the super smart have access to. The U.S. has always had a deeply fearful and indoctrinated culture, going right back to the days of the Committee on Public Information and the Red Scare, and given that they largely dominate communication technologies (including the internet), we're exposed to those same traits. Real conspiracies do certainly exist, but they're so mundane that no one talks about them -- a high level meeting at BP or ExxonMobil is largely off-limits to the public and has world-changing implications, but we don't call that conspiracy.

Anyway, if you put aside all the /boo/ nonsense, there have been serious scientists debating the existence of aliens based on the evidence that we have. One of the most famous and informative debates was between Carl Sagan and Ernst Mayr. Sagan argued there must be intelligent aliens judging by the size of the universe, Mayr was a biologist who argued that we should look at the life we know -- and their tendency to die out before reaching the intelligence necessary to communicate across planets.
>> No. 4833 Anonymous
19th October 2019
Saturday 10:56 am
4833 spacer
I used to be properly terrified of aliens without even thinking they were real/on Earth. If I caught some daft UFO investigation show on Channel 4 before bed, I genuinely wouldn't be able to sleep. That seems to have gone away these days, but if ET comes round my endz he's gonna' get merked up.
>> No. 4834 Anonymous
19th October 2019
Saturday 11:00 am
4834 spacer
The first and last evidence we're likely to have of aliens is a big lump of rock hurled at the planet, at near relativistic speeds.
>> No. 4835 Anonymous
19th October 2019
Saturday 11:18 am
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>>4833

That's largely down to the aesthetic of how it's presented, I think, which takes on that silly /boo/ tone. It's the grainy amateur footage, giving the impression it's genuinely something outside the realm of human knowledge and control accidentally caught by random recording -- something horror films exploit all the time.
>> No. 4836 Anonymous
19th October 2019
Saturday 11:44 am
4836 spacer
>>4835
No, you're making assumptions about me that are wrong and I hate that. Frankly, you're so busy assuming so you should have been able to figure that out.

I think aliens are frightening because once aliens exist and/or are on Earth then we're no longer the dominant species. Intellectually speaking, anything that can make its way here in due order is probably far smarter than ourselves. Alien contact would completely alter humanity's place in the universe and these aliens aren't going to be like my old pals Garus and Tali or sexy, sexy Lwaxana Troi, we've got no idea what they're going to be like. They might be alright, but something totally alien and so advanced as to be hopping from solar system to solar system could have motives and machinations completely beyond our understanding. What if they take all the tortoises? Or try to greet us by bombarding the planet with gamma radiation? What if they just sailed on by and ignored us? This shit's scary. Signs flipped my lid as a kiddy, but the aliens in that are basically dumb animals, we have machine guns and Brimstone missiles to deal with that sort of thing. But what kind of firearm do you use against the species that leaves an untranslatable message before hurling itself into the Sun? There isn't any weapons system that can kill cripping existential distress.
>> No. 4837 Anonymous
19th October 2019
Saturday 12:21 pm
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>>4836

I did say something "genuinely outside our understanding or control", but point taken.

I can say for myself it's largely the presentation of those documentaries, with their eerie music and such, that makes the prospect of meeting alien life seem scary.

The truth is more along the lines of what you describe. We would have absolutely no idea what to expect, and nothing to compare it to in our history. Some people look at the meeting of different cultures during the European conquests, but even that's humans meeting humans on the planet earth.

It's interesting that all our science fiction seems to focus on face to face meetings with alien life. I could have this totally wrong, but it seems more likely that there'd be extremely distant communications, first.
>> No. 4838 Anonymous
19th October 2019
Saturday 1:26 pm
4838 spacer
>>4836
>what kind of firearm do you use against the species that leaves an untranslatable message before hurling itself into the Sun?
You probably don't need to as it just hurled itself into a sun
>> No. 4839 Anonymous
19th October 2019
Saturday 1:30 pm
4839 spacer

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>>4832
>I wish I could find it, but I'm sure I've read somewhere that the FBI encouraged rampant speculation about the JFK assassination and UFOs in the 1960s to draw attention away from Cointelpro -- a true conspiracy involving propaganda and outright murder of U.S. citizens.

My understanding is that the JFK conspiracy was fanned by the KGB and UFOs were a cover for the B2 programme.

>>4833
I used to be the same but then memes happened so I'd probably just laugh at an alien these days.

>>4836
If you apply some logic then you can easily enough work out how they'd behave. Interstellar aliens would have to be curious and pro-social to even get to our level and they wouldn't be some sinister uniform civilisation but lots of divergent personalities with mundane objectives.

I think the fear is explainable in just how they represent a hostile tribe. Hence their almost synonymous identity in our imagination with demons.
>> No. 4840 Anonymous
19th October 2019
Saturday 6:20 pm
4840 spacer
>>4839

>and they wouldn't be some sinister uniform civilisation but lots of divergent personalities with mundane objectives.

I don't know about that. I know it's a very Sci-Fi thing to say, but they could all share a consciousness or be the last surviving community on a planet that worships a cult like figure obsessed with blue planets or anything really. You're probably right that they need to be curious and social, but even then, I don't think it's impossible to end up with some sort of intelligent fungus with legs that just wants to eat every tree they can find.
>> No. 4841 Anonymous
20th October 2019
Sunday 5:35 pm
4841 spacer
Fermi's paradox ensures that there are others out there but first the distances could be too big, especially if there is no warp drive and everyone is limited to lightspeed.

Second, the universe is not Sid Meier's Civilization, not everyone spawned at the same time. Human civilization started 20.000 years ago, but we started acting as civilized, technological people only in the last 150 years. There is a good chance that if we met the Aliens they would be as incomprehensible to us as a network engineer with a bionic hand would be incomprehensible to an ancient Egyptian farmer.
>> No. 4842 Anonymous
20th October 2019
Sunday 5:39 pm
4842 spacer

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>>4841
The spirit of your analogy isn't wrong but ancient Egyptians used prostheses. They'd get the gist of it even if impressed by how well it works.
>> No. 4843 Anonymous
20th October 2019
Sunday 5:57 pm
4843 spacer
>Do you believe in aliens?
Yes. Because of the vastness of the Universe.

>Do you believe we are visited by aliens?
No evidence.

>Have you ever seen or encountered any aliens?
No.

>Does the government know about aliens but cover it up?
No evidence.

>Did aliens visit and influence our ancestors in the past? Are aliens friendly, benign, or threatening?
If we were visited by intelligent life, I think they would harvest the resources of our planet and subjugate us. Much like in the past when humans with superior technology met those who were primitive (see the new world).
>> No. 4844 Anonymous
19th November 2019
Tuesday 7:58 am
4844 spacer
I've never really spoken about this to anyone before, I'm not 100% saying it was an alien or anything but I think this is the right place to tell this story.

In 2013 I fucked up a quite important exam and needed to get away for a few days. A mate of mine was going down to Cornwall camping with some hippie friends of his and I agreed to tag along. There was a big permanent Ghegnis Khan style tent at the campsite with a stove in it etc and we basically would just sit up all night in there drinking and chatting or (when it wasn't raining) we would do like a fire outside.

On the last night before we went home we ran out of firewood and so I went over to the next campsite over to borrow some wood. We'd spoken to the people who were staying there quite a bit and knew they wouldn't mind. There were these long holes in the ground between the campsites and it was really dark so I can't really say for sure but Worf was there.

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