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>> No. 431786 Anonymous
28th October 2019
Monday 8:03 am
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New midweek thread: Let's enter Robot Wars edition.
Expand all images.
>> No. 431788 Anonymous
28th October 2019
Monday 9:13 am
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I had an RC Sir Killalot as a kiddy, but we were too poor to buy the weird batteries it needed and the house was tiny anyway.
>> No. 431791 Anonymous
28th October 2019
Monday 12:48 pm
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>>431788
I don't think RC toys are ever as good as you hope they're going to be.

Also, Dead Metal was the best house robot.
>> No. 431795 Anonymous
28th October 2019
Monday 7:33 pm
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>>431791
>I don't think RC toys are ever as good as you hope they're going to be.

If you build them yourself, from all the parts - they definitely are. I would agree that pre-built or ready-made ones are quite disappointing.
>> No. 431796 Anonymous
28th October 2019
Monday 7:54 pm
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From what I've seen, the RC toys you can buy today actually do what the adverts for toys made 20 years ago promised.
>> No. 431797 Anonymous
28th October 2019
Monday 8:26 pm
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>>431796
They do - you can buy particularly good all-metal RC cars, with gearboxes and all sorts on BangGood for less than fifty quid, shipped from China/Slough. If you like RC stuff, particularly cars, planes or drones, Banggood is good shit.
>> No. 431798 Anonymous
28th October 2019
Monday 9:43 pm
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Remote control cars have been ace since the nineties if not long before that. You just needed the imagination to look beyond Argos and TV adverts.


>> No. 431800 Anonymous
28th October 2019
Monday 10:20 pm
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I've always really admired custom-built super-size RC jet airplanes.


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TOewW2_esBM

That takes some proper skill and dedication to your hobby. I saw a documentary on TV once about people like that. Because you cannot (or choose not to) build your plane from a kit, you have to get in touch with the airplane manufacturer and hope that they will kindly supply you data like dimensions and measurements so that your model plane is faithful to the original. If you want your plane to carry livery of a real-life commercial airline, it's best to contact them as well, if just to prevent copyright infringement hassles due to you using their logos and what-have-you. And then it still often takes weeks or months of obtaining special permits to be allowed to take your own photos of the real thing at an airport so you can adjust all the tiny little details of your model. All in all, that's why those planes like the one in the video can cost in excess of £25,000 to build. And that's not even counting the fact that without any formal mechanical training, you will be out of your depth at almost every turn.

So yeah, that's a hobby that has always fascinated me, but for which I will probably never possess the required level of mechanical skill, or just simply the money to build a plane like that.
>> No. 431802 Anonymous
29th October 2019
Tuesday 12:45 am
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>>431800

I think you might enjoy Mark Evans' series A Plane is Born. He builds a light aircraft from a kit and learns to fly it. When he finally gets to take his first solo flight in the aircraft he built, it's really rather moving.

&list=PLz6rFlieI6zcX_s2ltRwjKGOmdtqbzzQh
>> No. 431803 Anonymous
29th October 2019
Tuesday 12:51 am
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>>431797

I think one of them mad racing/stunt drones will be my next project. Apparently I'm "not allowed" to build a homemade microlight because "we can't afford it if you die" so this will have to do.
>> No. 431806 Anonymous
29th October 2019
Tuesday 1:39 am
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>>431803
I can confirm that building racing drones is enormous fun. I'm well into double-figures on them. Flying them (with first person video) is great but I think that building them yourself is even better.
>> No. 431807 Anonymous
29th October 2019
Tuesday 1:56 am
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>>431797

Hobbyking are also excellent for RC stuff. The prices aren't always as keen as Banggood, but they specialise in RC and have a much wider range.

Modern brushless/lipo vehicles are brutally powerful; the top end of the hobby goes well beyond the toy adverts and seems to defy the laws of physics.


>> No. 431808 Anonymous
29th October 2019
Tuesday 2:14 am
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>>431806

Assuming I've done a load of similar hobbies before and know which end of a soldering iron to hold (and can do surface mount too), where should I start? Cheaper is better as I don't know how long it'll hold my attention.
>> No. 431809 Anonymous
29th October 2019
Tuesday 6:43 am
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>>431803
>Apparently I'm "not allowed" to build a homemade microlight because "we can't afford it if you die"

Take out life insurance. Problem solved.
>> No. 431811 Anonymous
29th October 2019
Tuesday 10:27 am
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>>431809

I have life insurance already, apparently the premiums shoot up if you start flying lessons, let alone flying in a shed-built microlight.

It's fucking bullshit, is what it is. You're more likely to die during pregnancy than in an air accident*

*as long as you count all commercial airline flights in that figure
>> No. 431812 Anonymous
29th October 2019
Tuesday 11:37 am
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My dad quite seriously injured himself many years ago and spent a long time in hospital. His own wounds were quite bad, but the fellow in the bed opposite had been doing something with his microlight when the engine started, with his arms still very much in the way. He still had both his arms by the time it was over, but they were about as much use as those chains moshers used to wear on their trousers.
>> No. 431813 Anonymous
29th October 2019
Tuesday 12:36 pm
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>>431811
The premiums shoot up only if you undertake 'hazardous pursuits' before taking out cover. If you have cover already in place and the premiums are guaranteed then you're golden.

You're also more likely to die during pregnancy if you create a pipe bomb for a gender reveal party.

https://www.theguardian.com/us-news/2019/oct/29/homemade-pipe-bomb-caused-accidental-death-at-gender-reveal-party
>> No. 431814 Anonymous
29th October 2019
Tuesday 1:33 pm
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Filled an online variant of BDI on a lazy day. Moderate depression. I've been told that a few times already.
I'm not buying, maybe I'm biased; also it's not like I feel that shite to actually do something about it.
>> No. 431816 Anonymous
29th October 2019
Tuesday 2:15 pm
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>>431813

I took out a life insurance policy after uni. Among the things I had to answer truthfully were if I was a smoker, if there were any known and frequently occurring hereditary terminal illnesses in my family, and if I engaged in pastimes and pursuits that posed an increased risk of injury or death.

I had actually quit smoking a short while before I signed the papers, and then went back to smoking within a year or two. I'm not sure if I would have had to notify them, but I then quit smoking for good about five years later and haven't had a single fag since, so I guess it shouldn't matter in the greater scheme of things.
>> No. 431817 Anonymous
29th October 2019
Tuesday 3:33 pm
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>>431813>>431816
All well and good, but if you lie on the form about smoking or dangerous sports, and then die from lung cancer while parachuting, they're not going to pay out on the claim; you won't care about this as you'll be dead, but the people left behind might.
>> No. 431818 Anonymous
29th October 2019
Tuesday 3:54 pm
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>>431817

You're not wrong in that insurance companies will try to cite any and all reasons that they can find to avoid having to pay out a large sum of money like that.

Your violation of the terms you agreed to still has to be substantial though and must have contributed to your death in an immediate manner. If you take up smoking and then one day you get hit by a bus in the street, surely your smoking had nothing to do with your actual cause of death. Possibly not even if you got distracted while crossing that street because you were in the process of lighting up a fag.
>> No. 431819 Anonymous
29th October 2019
Tuesday 4:07 pm
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>>431818
The insurance industry operates under the "utmost good faith" doctrine, even though these days the information asymmetry that caused them to do so has now reversed. As a result, if it's a non-trivial sum they'll try anything to avoid paying it.

It's a perverse incentive that turns up all over the place. Just as the insurance companies have entire teams dedicated to finding excuses not to pay out, train companies have entire teams dedicated to finding excuses to not be liable for delays.
>> No. 431820 Anonymous
29th October 2019
Tuesday 4:38 pm
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>>431819
>insurance companies have entire teams dedicated to finding excuses not to pay out

Yeah exactly this - it's a rite of passage to crash a car and then have to deal with the "loss adjusters" to actually get some money back.
>> No. 431821 Anonymous
29th October 2019
Tuesday 4:44 pm
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>>431819

I think all that is mainly because margins in the insurance industry have been dwindling for some time. Just like other easily automatable services like banking or travel, consumers are now able to compare prices online in a jiffy, and that has brought insurance premiums down. While the ability to sell direct-to-client has also saved distribution cost on the supplier side, i.e. for the insurance companies themselves, this kind of market transparency at a mouse click has made it harder to turn a profit against your competitors. And naturally, in a world of low interest rates, it becomes more difficult for insurers to invest their clients' money profitably.

It's not really that people live more dangerously nowadays. And with life expectancy and public healh still increasing steadily, the insurance risk shouldn't be greater than it ever was. It's the business itself that has become quite fiercely competitive, and if insurance companies find a way to cut corners, they usually will.
>> No. 431822 Anonymous
29th October 2019
Tuesday 4:45 pm
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>>431820
I was quite fortunate when I did it that the car was worth fuck all so when I asked for a bit more they didn't argue. General rule of thumb is that anything under a grand they'll happily dispose of quickly.
>> No. 431824 Anonymous
29th October 2019
Tuesday 5:16 pm
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>>431822

I got my car stolen over night once. I was out of town on a job interview in Maidenhead that I was scheduled to have the next morning, so I took a train from Manchester to Maidenhead the day before and stayed in a hotel down there. Then when I came back the next evening, my car was gone. It was fully insured and had a resale value of around £5,000 at the time. The insurance company thought it smelled a rat when I told them that I was gone over night, and especially when they asked to be handed my remaining car keys and I told them that I only had one other key. They insisted that cars normally come with three keys, and actually said to me on the phone that I shouldn't take it personally, but that they sometimes had people "who in the end couldn't really say for sure if their car had been stolen or not". In other words, they were actually fucking insinuating that I had my car stolen on purpose to collect the insurance, and/or that the whole thing was staged to scam them.

Luckily, I was then able to show them that the bill of sale from when I bought the car from a private seller three years earlier clearly stated that only two keys had been handed over to me with the car.

I then filed a complaint with the FCA against my insurance and told them I was accused of having my own car stolen, but it kind of didn't really go anywhere. At least my insurance in the end didn't get around compensating me, so I got nearly all of my £5K back. They still deducted about 250 quid because although I was able to prove to them that similar cars were selling for roughly that amount, and actually more than that in good nick, they said they had no way of ascertaining that my stolen specimen was really in a similar condition at the time of the theft. Bastards.
>> No. 431826 Anonymous
29th October 2019
Tuesday 5:47 pm
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This week I have been mostly enjoying people being upset that Ash Sarkar sells t-shirts.
>> No. 431827 Anonymous
29th October 2019
Tuesday 5:55 pm
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>>431826
Literally who?
>> No. 431828 Anonymous
29th October 2019
Tuesday 6:47 pm
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>>431827
You know how to use wikipedia and google don't you granddad?
>> No. 431829 Anonymous
29th October 2019
Tuesday 7:10 pm
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I've just put my pyjamas on the radiator so they'll be nice and toasty at bedtime.
>> No. 431839 Anonymous
29th October 2019
Tuesday 9:21 pm
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>>431829
I did think today about whether or not a hot water bottle was a good purchase. I think I might do it.
>> No. 431841 Anonymous
29th October 2019
Tuesday 10:38 pm
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I'm pretty anxious about wintering my Dragon Trees and assorted Cactodes and Succulents. A couple of disasters happened last year where I managed to kill a five-stem Dracaena Marginata Tricolour and most of my succulents by giving them too much heat and water, and not enough light. I also accidentally propogated a load of Aloes the same way by letting them get "leggy", snipping the stems where they started going white, and repotting the cuttings after keeping them in my airing cubpoard for a week. The donor plants then just panicked and grew several pups in the same pots and now I have dozens of the fuckers.
>> No. 431842 Anonymous
29th October 2019
Tuesday 11:08 pm
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>>431829
I did that with some glasses once, but the lenses melted :(
>> No. 431843 Anonymous
29th October 2019
Tuesday 11:20 pm
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>>431842

It's okay, you probably didn't need them anyway if you were warming them up for bedtime.
>> No. 431844 Anonymous
30th October 2019
Wednesday 12:03 am
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>>431841
I'm trying to propagate some cacti currently, I may have picked the wrong time for it but I was excited to get started. I have a young aloe too.

If it's any help, my Schlumbergera seems perfectly happy wintering with the same lazy care I give it all year around, just being dunked once a month or so.
>> No. 431849 Anonymous
30th October 2019
Wednesday 7:40 pm
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>>431841>>431844
I've recently had a lot of success growing succulents and cacti in a terrarium. Obvious really, and a bit of a faff to get them in the bottle, but even cuttings root and grow really well.
>> No. 431850 Anonymous
31st October 2019
Thursday 4:08 am
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>>431841
>Cactodes
>> No. 431854 Anonymous
31st October 2019
Thursday 1:23 pm
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I think my sister-in-law must be the beigest person I have ever met.

There were the twigs in vases. There were decorative owls. There were wooden butterflies in picture frames. Candles everywhere. I can't describe her as having anything resembling a personality. Her only interests seem to be drinking prosecco and flavoured gin. I bet she listens to Ellie Goulding.
>> No. 431855 Anonymous
31st October 2019
Thursday 3:01 pm
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>>431854

>There were the twigs in vases. There were decorative owls. There were wooden butterflies in picture frames. Candles everywhere.

About a quarter of Ikea employees would be out of a job if women didn't have an obsession for these things.
>> No. 431861 Anonymous
31st October 2019
Thursday 9:35 pm
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Got some chestnuts from Lidl tonight. They're in the oven right now.

There was a time when sweet chestnuts were considered poor people's food. I think during Dickensian times especially. Sweet chestnut trees lined city streets and country lanes, and they were a free food source for the destitute who would pick the ripe chestnuts up from the ground in droves.

In pre-Industrial times, salmon was actually a poor people food as well. Because our rivers hadn't been polluted and the salmon fished to near-extinction, there was a vast abundance of salmon in British rivers and streams that was free for anyone to take, unlike the wildlife in forests and pastures, which was usually the personal property of the local Lord of the Manor. There are even accounts that servants complained that they were given salmon to eat every single day of the week, again because salmon was free and easy to obtain, and some cities actually passed ordinances that gave servants the right to a more diverse diet.

I love useless history knowledge.
>> No. 431862 Anonymous
31st October 2019
Thursday 10:58 pm
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>>431861
They are wonderful roasted, with a lot of salt. You used to get the dudes in that London who sold them by the sides of the road at this time of year, but they've all disappeared.
>> No. 431867 Anonymous
1st November 2019
Friday 11:47 am
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>>431862

I had some cracking ones at the Prague christmas market last year.

Nearly half of the ones from Lidl that I ate yesterday had the chestnut weevil in them though. It's a parasitic larva that eats the inside of the chestnut and then defecates into it, as you can see by the black spots it leaves. Not very appetising to look at, and the affected chestnut should not be eaten because the flavour of the intact parts of it will be ruined.
>> No. 431868 Anonymous
1st November 2019
Friday 12:06 pm
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Not going to lie, chestnuts sound horrible. Of course they're nice if you cover them with salt, so are 90% of known foods and most of those aren't full of insects.
>> No. 431869 Anonymous
1st November 2019
Friday 12:24 pm
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>>431868

> if you cover them with salt

You probably haven't eaten chestnuts yourself. They usually come with enough flavour and sweetness that you don't need any salt or anything like that.
>> No. 431871 Anonymous
1st November 2019
Friday 12:35 pm
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>>431869
I'm the wrong man to judging them anyway. I don't really care for nutty flavours and while I'd like to believe chestnuts would be a revalation, I've been let down in the past.
>> No. 431872 Anonymous
1st November 2019
Friday 12:56 pm
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My local Fultons Foods has loads of Chicago Town stuffed crust pizzas, one meant to be sold in cafés and the like, at £2.50 for two. Needless to say, I now own enough pizzas to see me through until New Year.
>> No. 431873 Anonymous
1st November 2019
Friday 1:39 pm
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>>431871

> I've been let down in the past.

Don't knock them till you've tried them. They can be had in most supermarkets for a good price at the moment. They were 99p for 100g at Lidl yesterday, which is about one handful.

Put them in the oven for 20 minutes at around 200°C.

It also helps to carve an "X" into the outer shell before you put them in the oven, because that way, they are easier to peel when done.
>> No. 431879 Anonymous
1st November 2019
Friday 8:41 pm
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Been to a firework display this evening. Over 40 fucking minutes of it. That display the other year where they accidentally unloaded them at once had the right idea.
>> No. 431889 Anonymous
2nd November 2019
Saturday 5:50 pm
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>>431872
I bought a couple of the cheese ones. They get a bit crispy in the middle.
>> No. 431898 Anonymous
2nd November 2019
Saturday 11:51 pm
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>>431872

I'll be off to Jack Fultons come Monday, then.
>> No. 431918 Anonymous
4th November 2019
Monday 10:38 am
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Ordered some mixed wildflower seeds online so I'm taking a few days out of work to dig up the lawn before it gets too cold to sow. I've got a mix of Corn Marigold, Corn Poppy, Field-forget-me-not, Wild mignonette, Lady's Bedstraw, Field Scabious, Selfheal, Red Campion, Ragged Robin, Hedge Woundwort, Kidney vetch, Cornflower, Bird's-foot trefoil, Viper's Bugloss, Cuckooflower, Common Knapweed, Field Scabious, Wild Marjoram, Cowslip, Wild Red Clover, Tufted Vetch and Bush Vetch. I'm not going to chuck the turf, instead I've got some basic hugelcultur mounds going bordering the garden so just adding it to them.
Thinking I'll chuck the seeds around the exposed soil with a mix of fish blood and bone stuff then give it a good raking.
Considering nicking all the neighbour's garden waste before bin day to add in too, may be a risk of contamination from chemicals and disease but it seems such a waste that everyone's throwing out all the nutrients. There are horse fields around too, don't know if I could get away with stealing the dung at night.

One of the two varieties of succulent I'm trying to germinate has come up. Only three of the twenty seeds planted so far but I wasn't expecting to see any at all for another four days at least so that's all quite hopeful. A couple of houseplants on the way too, should brighten the place up.
>> No. 431919 Anonymous
4th November 2019
Monday 10:41 am
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>>431917 hugelcultur

Hmm, interesting. I've got a garden to start from scratch, a shitload of trees to cut down, and hate bending over. A plan forms...
>> No. 431920 Anonymous
4th November 2019
Monday 10:44 am
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>>431919
and horse people would almost certainly be happy to give you as much crap as you can carry. They'll have a heap somewhere you can swipe from if you ask and aren't a dick. Definitely no need to skulk around nicking it, which would worry them, nobody likes random people in the fields.
>> No. 431921 Anonymous
4th November 2019
Monday 11:28 am
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>>431920
I'll ask! Cheers. Then all I have to worry about is the neighbours complaining about the smell.
>> No. 431923 Anonymous
4th November 2019
Monday 2:10 pm
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I've brought an old electronic dartboard back to life that's been in my basement unused for over ten years. Had to buy a new DC adaptor because I couldn't find the old one. The plastic of the darts has become brittle though, they are kind of cheaply made and came with the board. The plastic tips broke off one after the other after a few rounds of playing and I'm going to have to see if I can get new tips from somewhere tonight. Or maybe just buy a proper set of new darts. Suggestions are welcome.
>> No. 431924 Anonymous
4th November 2019
Monday 2:13 pm
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>>431923

https://www.dartscorner.co.uk/index.php?cPath=282_1056_1057
>> No. 431925 Anonymous
4th November 2019
Monday 2:32 pm
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>>431924

Blimey. I would have no idea how to pick the right tips from that huge selection.

I think I will just buy a new set of mid-range darts. Seems like the most sensible investment. As I said, the ones that came with the board are shoddy quality as it is. Even though the board itself is a good proper board like any other. I think I got it for my birthday or Christmas about fifteen years ago.
>> No. 431926 Anonymous
4th November 2019
Monday 6:05 pm
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>>431925

They all have the standard 2BA thread, so should fit any set of soft tip darts. The cheap long life tips below will work fine. Regardless of whether you buy new darts, I'd recommend getting plenty of spare tips - they sell them in bulk packs for a reason.

https://www.dartscorner.co.uk/product_info.php?cPath=282_1056_1057&products_id=9770

https://www.dartscorner.co.uk/product_info.php?cPath=282_1318&products_id=25833
>> No. 431935 Anonymous
5th November 2019
Tuesday 10:44 am
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People I know are complaining about help to buy mortgages because they're now looking to remortgage and if they repay the government loan then they'll have to spend over a grand on admin, legal and valuation fees plus 25% of the growth in value of their home since they originally took it out. They're claiming that they didn't know any of this when they took them out, the estate agents omitted to tell them about it and they've been mis-sold by the government.
>> No. 431937 Anonymous
5th November 2019
Tuesday 4:15 pm
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>>431935

> They're claiming that they didn't know any of this when they took them out, the estate agents omitted to tell them about it and they've been mis-sold by the government.

Kind of a convenient excuse. As an estate agent, you are not liable to tell people about the finer points of remortgaging, unless you've negligently and/or deliberately misrepresented facts in order to close the sale. But even then, a court could rule that the onus to double check all these things was ultimately on the buyer.

An estate agent's responsibilities don't really go all that far beyond accurately presenting a property to a potential buyer with all its flaws. Principles of negligence apply here as well, i.e. you must familiarise yourself in-depth with the property you are selling, but on the other hand, if you can prove that you as the estate agent and man in the middle were misled by the seller and passed on false information to the buyer in good faith that it was correct, you're not even liable for that.
>> No. 431938 Anonymous
5th November 2019
Tuesday 5:09 pm
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Just under half the lawn dug now. It's starting to get easier but I'm not looking forward to finishing; it's nice to be gardening outdoors at this time of year, especially something this physical.
>> No. 431958 Anonymous
6th November 2019
Wednesday 12:38 pm
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I don't always watch Ashens videos, but when I do I watch about 50 of them back to back until his brown sofa is burnt onto my retinas like I'd been staring into the Sun.
>> No. 431959 Anonymous
6th November 2019
Wednesday 1:17 pm
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>>431958
Did someone find out that he posted here at some point or have I completely imagined it?
>> No. 431960 Anonymous
6th November 2019
Wednesday 2:37 pm
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Lawn just over half-dug now. Getting blisters in some unlikely places which is the main thing slowing me down; my body's woken up a bit and my muscles are happy for me to do more in each day so I would if it wasn't for the skin falling off my palms. The trick is to get the turf up in unbroken pieces so all the grass seed that's laying on the surface doesn't spill onto the bare soil. May see if the neighbour has one of those long butane torches to run over the places where there's a lot of grass seed.

Snake plant arrived by post so I've re-potted that with a perlite topping and put it in the bathroom. Been throwing out less plastic so I have a huge amount of things I can use as pots but not so much I can use as the bowls for the pots to sit in.
>> No. 431980 Anonymous
7th November 2019
Thursday 12:29 pm
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Around the 3/5 dug mark now but the blisters are stopping me going any further, despite putting plasters and gloves over them.
Does anyone have any advice for how to heal them faster or stop them rubbing when I dig?
>> No. 431981 Anonymous
7th November 2019
Thursday 12:40 pm
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>>431980
I don't know if they'd work on your hands, but I've used special blister plasters on my feet recently and they're miraculous. Maybe that's what you've already done, I'm not sure.
>> No. 431983 Anonymous
7th November 2019
Thursday 1:07 pm
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>>431981
I'll see if they stick.
>> No. 431984 Anonymous
7th November 2019
Thursday 1:27 pm
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Someone at work brought in lunch for me. Now I reek of garlic.
>> No. 431997 Anonymous
8th November 2019
Friday 3:50 pm
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>>431984

Bit ungrateful.
>> No. 431998 Anonymous
8th November 2019
Friday 4:50 pm
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>>431997
He never said if he was or wasn't happy about it. I think he must have been happy though or else he'd have posted that in the /101/ thread.
>> No. 431999 Anonymous
8th November 2019
Friday 5:24 pm
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>>431998
I'd rate it a 6.5 out of 10. I'm not quite sure on mashed avocado as a pasta sauce.
>> No. 432000 Anonymous
8th November 2019
Friday 8:13 pm
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>>431999
With each passing day I hate, what I will call, for want of a better phrase, the food culture of the this nation more and more.
>> No. 432031 Anonymous
11th November 2019
Monday 9:47 pm
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I bought some chestnuts from M&S tonight for comparison against the Lidl ones from the other week.

The M&S chestnuts are bigger and heavier, and more expensive, while disappointingly, they are less sweet and have less overall flavour. On the other hand, no sign of the dreaded chestnut weevil infestation on these here chestnuts.

Fucking burned my fingertips peeling one just now though.
>> No. 432032 Anonymous
11th November 2019
Monday 10:15 pm
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Choc Ices seem better than chestnuts.
>> No. 432033 Anonymous
11th November 2019
Monday 11:28 pm
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Channel4 (4seven actually) are scraping the bottom of the barrel again right now with a programme on fat shut ins.

Weirdly entertaining mix of poverty and obesity porn.
>> No. 432034 Anonymous
12th November 2019
Tuesday 7:08 am
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I flat out don't want today. I want to go back to bed.
>> No. 432035 Anonymous
12th November 2019
Tuesday 9:11 am
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>>432034
I hope you called in sick or otherwise knocked today on the head, mate. I myself have woken up feeling oddly fatigued for no discernable reason.
>> No. 432036 Anonymous
12th November 2019
Tuesday 11:22 am
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I've just had the world's biggest dump and I want you all to know, lads. I feel like I've lost a stone. I'm going to sit here basking in the glorious relief for about another five minutes just to compound the feeling of victory.

It's little things like this that get me through a day.
>> No. 432037 Anonymous
12th November 2019
Tuesday 12:27 pm
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>>432036
I had a crap last week that was so aesthetically perfect I don't know if I'll ever forget it. Genuinely amazed at what a bit of fibre in my diet has achieved.
>> No. 432039 Anonymous
12th November 2019
Tuesday 1:25 pm
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>>432037

I remember stumbling across a blog online once where somebody documented their bowel movements every day with a high-resolution photo of their poo in the bowl. I think it was actually supposed to be an art project. At least that's what they claimed without any obvious hint of irony.
>> No. 432041 Anonymous
12th November 2019
Tuesday 8:43 pm
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I just shit myself and had to take some Imodium. Better out than in only applies when a casual cough doesn't trigger the emergency flood button on your colon.

The cat is just staring at me with this pitying look on it's face. Thank christ it's early enough to not arouse suspicion by doing a wash, the missus will be none the wiser. "We needed clean towels, love." Fullproof.
>> No. 432042 Anonymous
12th November 2019
Tuesday 8:47 pm
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>>432041

>Fullproof.
>> No. 432045 Anonymous
12th November 2019
Tuesday 9:46 pm
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>>432035
I didn't. Today hasn't been so bad. I'm now in bed reading The Third Policeman, so things could be worse.
>> No. 432048 Anonymous
13th November 2019
Wednesday 1:37 am
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Replaced my phone screen for the gorillianth time. Stress ate quite a lot of honey along the way, but I can finally be a proper 21st century cunt again. Can't wait to not be texted by anyone, scroll past her number over and over and break it again in four months.

God, I actually hate life, it's awful.
>> No. 432049 Anonymous
13th November 2019
Wednesday 5:59 am
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I've seriously, seriously got to stop bashing one out over Grace Millane. I thought I had it under control, but now she's in the news again I can't stop.
>> No. 432050 Anonymous
13th November 2019
Wednesday 4:39 pm
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With each Job interview, I am becoming more and more like Spud from Trainspotting. I just couldn't shut up. However, the intervew panelists did tell me that many of my answers were excellent (it was a competency-based interview). I just hope that they were the most excellent, because I'm currently earning less than a McDonald's employee for my 37.5 and I carn't facking cope.
>> No. 432052 Anonymous
13th November 2019
Wednesday 5:10 pm
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>>432049
I think wanking over a girl who was raped and murdered is in somewhat poor taste, yes.
>> No. 432053 Anonymous
13th November 2019
Wednesday 5:36 pm
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>>432052

It takes all kinds.
>> No. 432055 Anonymous
13th November 2019
Wednesday 5:54 pm
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>>432052
I'm not wanting over her because she was raped and murdered, she just gives me a right stonk on because she's fit and was clearly up for a bit of filth.
>> No. 432056 Anonymous
13th November 2019
Wednesday 6:24 pm
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>>432055
Lad. You're just digging a deeper and deeper hole.
Pun genuinely not intended
>> No. 432058 Anonymous
13th November 2019
Wednesday 6:38 pm
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>>432055

>and was clearly up for a bit of filth.


Tell that to her family.


Also, she looks vaguely under age in the black and white picture on the left. So you're essentially knocking one out to underage pictures of a dead girl. Even Jimmy saville would probably think that's a bit much.
>> No. 432061 Anonymous
13th November 2019
Wednesday 8:00 pm
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>>432042

Can't even count the holes on a cat properly, what do you expect?
>> No. 432062 Anonymous
13th November 2019
Wednesday 8:05 pm
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>>432055
I'm sure you're just joking, but the "it was rough sex gone wrong" shit is the oldest get out in the violent creep playbook of ways to try to get off a murder charge and I hope the cunt who killed her gets bagged, if they have that in Aus'.
>> No. 432063 Anonymous
13th November 2019
Wednesday 8:24 pm
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At work today someone received a bouquet of flowers and a helium balloon from Interflora as a first anniversary present from her boyfriend.

Everyone said it was a massive show of insecurity on his part and it's his way of marking his territory to warn all the men in the office to back off her. I've had a look online and the flowers cost over £50 and then extra on top for the balloon and vase it came in.
>> No. 432064 Anonymous
13th November 2019
Wednesday 8:34 pm
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>>432063
So I guess you're living in an episode of Friends. Expect a barbershop quartet to turn up next.
>> No. 432065 Anonymous
13th November 2019
Wednesday 8:34 pm
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>>432063

What did she reckon to it though?

I tend feel like as blokes, we disapprove of that kind of gesture because we don't like seeing some prat let the side down, by causing everyone else's bird to give them that "you never do that" look.

By the same token I feel like birds tend to downplay such gestures and pretend they're embarrassed, when secretly, nothing makes their clit tingle like all the other women in the office sat there with the monk on thinking "my boyfriend never does that."
>> No. 432066 Anonymous
13th November 2019
Wednesday 8:37 pm
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>>432063

>Everyone said it was a massive show of insecurity on his part and it's his way of marking his territory to warn all the men in the office to back off her.

Everyone sounds like jealous twats. It was at work because she wouldn't have been expecting it so it was more of a surprise.
>> No. 432067 Anonymous
13th November 2019
Wednesday 8:39 pm
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>>432065
I think she liked it. She seemed more surprised than anything.

For a bit of further information, this isn't the first time he's had flowers delivered to her at work and he's definitely punching above his weight with her. Also, when her marriage was falling apart she had a couple of brief flings with much younger men, although neither of them work here anymore.
>> No. 432069 Anonymous
13th November 2019
Wednesday 8:54 pm
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>>432067

Ah right. Definite peacocking then.

She's 100% going to end up cheating on him.
>> No. 432071 Anonymous
13th November 2019
Wednesday 9:17 pm
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>>432063
>the balloon and vase it came in

Why would he put a balloon in a vase!? That girl will be in a future copy of METRO for all the wrong reasons.
>> No. 432087 Anonymous
14th November 2019
Thursday 5:31 pm
432087 I guess this is relevant because i ate 8 of them midweek.
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Co-Op Wraps are by far the best - possibly due to the proximity of the shops to my house. Tesco brand are very sweet, and Sainsburies are drier and a little brittle (though i haven't had many of these). Mission brand are awful - something in them give me the feeling to gag; low quality wheat (corn?) or an additive, i don't know.

They're working really nicely as the pizza base for a light lunch (check the heat though, they're wont to burn).
Or for something heavier try a bit of cabbage, carrot and onion with mayonaise.

Perhaps not the quality of post we're used to, but i thought to contribute something.

Would there be much interest in a consumer reviews thread?
>> No. 432089 Anonymous
14th November 2019
Thursday 5:55 pm
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>>432087
In my experience Asda wraps are the worst. I've tried Co-op ketchup recently and it's surprisingly a lot better than I expected it to be; I'd pick it over Heinz.

If you want a review thread you might as well hijack >>/nom/12900.
>> No. 432123 Anonymous
17th November 2019
Sunday 2:53 pm
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>>432087

Aldi wraps are worth a go. They even do poncey ones with seeds in and garlic and herb flavoured ones, if you're into that sort of thing.
>> No. 432131 Anonymous
18th November 2019
Monday 5:13 pm
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I got back to my car and it was ridiculously condensed on the inside of the windscreen. It hadn't happened to any of the others in the car park, so I'm guessing my car wasn't fully airtight or something like that.
>> No. 432132 Anonymous
18th November 2019
Monday 7:20 pm
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>>432131
How old's your car? I think that starts to happen with every car over ~10 years old.
>> No. 432134 Anonymous
18th November 2019
Monday 7:22 pm
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>>432132>>432133
It's a 64 plate. It's a Picasso so the windscreen is fucking massive, if that makes any difference.
>> No. 432135 Anonymous
18th November 2019
Monday 9:45 pm
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I've got a cold and am feeling miserable as fuck. Lying on the sofa, aimlessly watching Netflix.
>> No. 432136 Anonymous
18th November 2019
Monday 11:01 pm
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>>432135
IT IS FREEZIN TONIGHT

Also on the sofa, wrapped up in a blanket.
>> No. 432138 Anonymous
19th November 2019
Tuesday 7:23 pm
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>>432136
EVEN COLDER TONIGHT
>> No. 432140 Anonymous
19th November 2019
Tuesday 7:35 pm
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My boiler's still broken. It broke on the 31st and I've already spent £100 on people to tell me "it's mostly broken" then "it's broken but I can replace it for two and a half grand more". It would have been £140 but the first boiler-plumber was having a nervous breakdown and never came back to pick up his pay or finish the job.
>> No. 432141 Anonymous
19th November 2019
Tuesday 11:22 pm
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>>432140

I had someone in to fix my boiler last year. They said the expansion vessel was broken, and it got changed for almost a grand. Not saying it ruined Christmas, but I certainly could have done without spending that kind of money in early December.
>> No. 432143 Anonymous
19th November 2019
Tuesday 11:44 pm
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Still feeling miserable, with my cold about as bad as it was yesterday.

Channel4 is showing another installment of its acclaimed series, "Shut Ins: Britain's Fattest People". Good to know other people have it much worse.
>> No. 432144 Anonymous
20th November 2019
Wednesday 2:48 am
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Second night in a row I’ve tried to sleep only to be woken by some silly nightmare.
>> No. 432146 Anonymous
21st November 2019
Thursday 12:12 pm
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Pivoting away from saying "shit" to using "crap" more often, like when I was a kid.
>> No. 432147 Anonymous
21st November 2019
Thursday 5:27 pm
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Trying to extricate myself with minimum drama from a mental slag, editing two books simultaneously, wondering if my visa stamp for the USA from two weeks ago is cool for re-entry in a couple of weeks, hit the bottle right away this evening after work, met an ex-porn director now working for Disney+ and two of his sometime starlets.

My life''s more interesting than yours but I am feeling fucked in the head. Can I just go back to sitting on .gs all day like it was 2011.
>> No. 432148 Anonymous
21st November 2019
Thursday 8:16 pm
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>>432147

If you're going in on a visa waiver / ESTA you can check your ESTA validity on the website. Afaik as long as you don't go over 90 days per calendar year (you might want to check if you have exit stamps proving how long you were in the states for during each visit).

I've never needed a visa for the US but I recall friends who needed one being able to do multiple entries as long as they didn't go over 90 days per calendar year.
>> No. 432149 Anonymous
21st November 2019
Thursday 11:16 pm
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>>432148
Cheers m7, next thing to worry about is if they think my hobby is 'work' in yankee doodle septic land. Gonna just pull the full Hugh Grant thing again at immigration.
>> No. 432150 Anonymous
21st November 2019
Thursday 11:41 pm
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I ate a whole tin of chili con carne from Lidl tonight. It's really starting to have its effect at the moment.

Lidl's chili is somewhat bland though, Tesco's is better. Had to add a good bit of salt.
>> No. 432151 Anonymous
21st November 2019
Thursday 11:49 pm
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I saw a little girl in Asda get properly excited when she saw the "It's only 'xx' sleeps till Christmas" sign, a sign that only reminds me of how futile and shortlived my existence is, and it restored a bit of faith in the holiday I've come to loathe most of all.

>>432150
Please treat yourself better than this.
>> No. 432152 Anonymous
22nd November 2019
Friday 3:05 am
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>>432149

Are you going to participate in an event related to your hobby like a conference? Any form of remunerated activity such as giving trainings for being paid for a talk is generally considered 'work' (which is rather silly, I know).

If you mean doing something like working on your website while on holiday sort of thing then don't even mention it, it only muddies the waters.
>> No. 432153 Anonymous
22nd November 2019
Friday 5:45 am
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>>432151

>Please treat yourself better than this.

No.
>> No. 432154 Anonymous
22nd November 2019
Friday 10:18 am
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>>432151
>>432153

What's wrong with a tin of beans now and then.
>> No. 432155 Anonymous
22nd November 2019
Friday 11:21 am
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Hmm... the rim of mug feels thicker than usual.
>> No. 432156 Anonymous
22nd November 2019
Friday 11:33 am
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>>432155
It's a plot by your boss to dehydrate you by gradually increasing the thickness of your mug until it can't hold any liquid.
>> No. 432157 Anonymous
22nd November 2019
Friday 12:16 pm
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I've just chipped a molar. Ironically, I went to the dentist yesterday and he said everything was fine; just a quick scale and polish. I chipped a different one around this time last year. My teeth seem to becoming quite brittle.

>>432156
If he brings in a Sports Direct mug then it'd take at least two years before it had any noticeable effect.
>> No. 432158 Anonymous
22nd November 2019
Friday 12:43 pm
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>>432156
>your boss
I wish.

>>432157
I'm increasingly convinced that no one really knows anything at all and everyone's just bullshitting. There are exceptions, but they're few and far between.
>> No. 432159 Anonymous
22nd November 2019
Friday 10:10 pm
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I'm probably going to regret this.
>> No. 432160 Anonymous
22nd November 2019
Friday 10:17 pm
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Just went to watch QT on iPlayer and as soon as the page loaded some shit appeared asking me why I hadn't clicked play yet and to give them feedback on why.

>>432159
Is this a show about bashing bugchaser's heads in?
>> No. 432161 Anonymous
22nd November 2019
Friday 10:22 pm
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>>432157

>My teeth seem to becoming quite brittle

They can, depending on age, but also on nutrition and lifestyle. Plenty of calcium in your diet is a good place to start. Things like smoking, a drug habit, or alcohol also affect mineralisation of your teeth. Methamphetamine in particular is notorious for causing tooth rot.

A higher than average intake of fizzy or acidic drinks like cola or orange juice is also a factor. Ironically, the latter also affects children whose parents give them too much fruit juice to drink in the belief that it is particularly healthy for them.
>> No. 432162 Anonymous
22nd November 2019
Friday 10:45 pm
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>>432161
It'll be fucking Robinsons double strength apple and blackcurrant squash. It's all I really drink at home, even though I go through several litres of water at work.
>> No. 432163 Anonymous
22nd November 2019
Friday 11:04 pm
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>>432162
It's cold out, switch to blackcurrant fruit infusions tea.
>> No. 432197 Anonymous
25th November 2019
Monday 2:14 pm
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I can't find the recent discussion on ultrawide monitors, so I'll just post this here:

There's a really good deal available right now on the Radeon 5700. OcUK are offering an Asus card for £315, which comes with a free three month Xbox game pass and a free copy of Borderlands 3 or Ghost Recon Breakpoint. Asus are offering £40 cashback, plus another £25 for leaving a review, so the total cost is only £250. The 5700 is a bit faster than the RTX 2060 or GTX 1080 and will do decent frame rates at 1440p on maximum settings.

https://www.overclockers.co.uk/asus-radeon-rx-5700-8gb-gddr6-pci-express-graphics-card-asus-65-pounds-cashback-gx-43d-as.html
>> No. 432198 Anonymous
25th November 2019
Monday 5:26 pm
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>>432161
> Methamphetamine in particular is notorious for causing tooth rot.

Not that I work for the methamphetamine promotion council or anything but the whole meth mouth thing is largely overstated. It's basically just a bunch of daft yanks smoking trailer park shake and bake which hasn't been washed properly and therefore contains far more hydrochloric acid than can possibly be good for you.

TL;DR - people can barely spell their own name shouldn't be attempting acid/base extractions in their own home.
>> No. 432199 Anonymous
25th November 2019
Monday 5:34 pm
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>>432198

How do we know that that isn't just Big Meth talking.
>> No. 432200 Anonymous
25th November 2019
Monday 5:52 pm
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I may have inadvertently created a bit of a situation at work.

On Friday night someone from the department I manage copped off with a lass from one of the other departments. The last workplace relationship ended very, very badly and there was lots of drama, so I thought I'd give the manager of the other team a quick heads up about it. Big mistake. I tend to be a fair bit more aware of what's going on so I filled her in that the feelings and seriousness are a lot stronger on her side than his. She took that as the cue to take her into a meeting and tell her that he has no interest in a relationship with her whatsoever. I definitely didn't say that and even if I did I've no idea why the fuck she'd tell her about it; what I did make clear is that I was only making her aware of what had happened in case anything else happens at work and there was no point in having a chat with her about it. I also told her that a lad in her department has fancied her for ages, regularly cockblocked the lad from my department and had been giving him daggers all morning since he found out so she better not have fucking said anything to him either.

Sage for petty workplace drama.
>> No. 432201 Anonymous
25th November 2019
Monday 5:56 pm
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>>432197

Appreciate the knowledge, ladm8.

Though from my research I still might need something beefier for max/near max settings - don't forget that an ultrawide 1440 is driving about 30% more pixels than normal 1440. It'd probably still handle everything I need it to, but I was looking at the refreshed 5700 xt or 2060 super for that extra edge. It might even make sense to spend even more for future proofing, I dunno.
>> No. 432202 Anonymous
25th November 2019
Monday 7:59 pm
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>>432200

You can rarely rely on a bird to treat a potentially delicate situation with tact. The supposedly higher "emotional intelligence" of women is complete bollocks in my experience.

Serves you right for being a meddling twat though. Let your staff do as they please, but make them aware that you know about it and won't cover their arse should it come crashing down on them.
>> No. 432203 Anonymous
25th November 2019
Monday 8:03 pm
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>>432200

This is what happens when you snitch mate. Imagine having an inter-departmental management meeting about two people having a snog on a friday night, and justifying it by comparing it to a full fledged relationship that ended badly. You and your ilk will be the first against the wall.
>> No. 432204 Anonymous
25th November 2019
Monday 8:12 pm
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>>432202>>432203
When I say the previous relationship at work ended badly I mean badly. As in, the woman involved getting pinned against the wall by her throat whilst he screamed in her face and lots of things in the office getting broken. It's something taken very seriously.

All I did was have a quick word to let her know about it in case she needed to be aware of it for the future. It wasn't a full blown crisis meeting and iy's hardly meddling or being a super snitch.
>> No. 432205 Anonymous
25th November 2019
Monday 8:18 pm
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>>432204

It's definitely meddling, regardless of whether or not you had previously hired a psychopath.
>> No. 432206 Anonymous
25th November 2019
Monday 8:42 pm
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>>432204
I'd love to see the guy you snitched on grab you by the throat and trash the office. Then you'll need an interdepartmental crackdown on pointless meddling in other people's personal affairs.
>> No. 432207 Anonymous
25th November 2019
Monday 9:39 pm
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>>432204

>As in, the woman involved getting pinned against the wall by her throat whilst he screamed in her face and lots of things in the office getting broken.

So in other words, the fact that two coworkers one time went completely ape shit with each other at work, had an unusually heated argument and smashed a tacky vase or two is your standard for how these things are expected to turn out.

Have some perspective, lad.


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uV5rFaaVoVg
>> No. 432208 Anonymous
25th November 2019
Monday 11:47 pm
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>>432200
Why would you do this? Why?
>> No. 432209 Anonymous
26th November 2019
Tuesday 6:57 am
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>>432206
We're off for a pint later in the week, we get on quite well.

>>432208
All I did was tell her what had happened as we were sat next to each other in a meeting. I wasn't expecting her to intervene and told her to do the opposite. You lads are massively overreacting.
>> No. 432210 Anonymous
26th November 2019
Tuesday 9:51 am
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I've texted Talkmobile to request my PAC code but they're saying I have to ring them for it. Isn't that illegal?
>> No. 432211 Anonymous
26th November 2019
Tuesday 11:22 am
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>>432210
Judging by a quick Google, yes. Says on Ofcom's website that they have to provide you with a PAC within a minute of you texting them. Complain.
>> No. 432212 Anonymous
26th November 2019
Tuesday 12:38 pm
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Time for another episode of "The Worlds Oldest Zoomer Struggles to Function at a Post Office".
>> No. 432213 Anonymous
26th November 2019
Tuesday 2:56 pm
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>>432209

>I wasn't expecting her to intervene and told her to do the opposite.

Sure, and you can't be blamed for her actions, but you still stuck your beak in for no real reason other than being one of "those" managers.
>> No. 432214 Anonymous
26th November 2019
Tuesday 3:14 pm
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>>432213
>being one of "those" managers
What does this mean? I'm not him, but I think he's explained the reasoning behind his actions quite clearly. A previous relationship in the workplace ended very badly and he wanted to ensure management were aware of this one in case it interfered with work.
>> No. 432215 Anonymous
26th November 2019
Tuesday 4:21 pm
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>>432214
As evidenced by some of the posts in this thread, some of the lads here start foaming at the mouth about anything they view as an authority figure or bootlicking towards one.
>> No. 432216 Anonymous
26th November 2019
Tuesday 4:35 pm
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>>432214

Meddling and unnecessarily overbearing. We're talking about a snog on a friday night, that's not even close to being enough to be concerned that this 'relationship' might spawn a very obviously extreme, violent ending. A lad at work recently had a heart attack on the job - is it then appropriate for me to tell other managers the next time I see another employee in the queue for Burger King more than once or twice a month? That's the level of disparity I see here. To expect every subsequent work dalliance to have the potential to end in criminal action is a bit of a stretch, and while I appreciate that witnessing such a traumatic event would stick with you and make you a bit more cautious, I still don't think it's super appropriate for a manager to mention to another manager that two underlings copped off in the pub - well-intentioned or not, this is just gossip.

I don't mean to make out that our lad's actions are the worst part of this story, the managerlass is clearly orders of magnitudes worse, but neither of them acted appropriately in my book, and I think at my workplace one manager telling another about a snog like that would be A Problem in itself.
>> No. 432217 Anonymous
26th November 2019
Tuesday 4:51 pm
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I've had the shits for days. Must be some sort of stomach flu.
>> No. 432218 Anonymous
26th November 2019
Tuesday 5:02 pm
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>>432217

Get well soon, m8.
>> No. 432219 Anonymous
27th November 2019
Wednesday 12:43 am
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I wish I had mates. No offence.
>> No. 432220 Anonymous
27th November 2019
Wednesday 12:56 am
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>>432219

None taken. This will sound trite but if you post on here you're definitely my mate, I spend a lot of time here. At the very least that's what I say to real life people because "my mate said x" sounds a lot better than "an anonymous britfag said x"
>> No. 432221 Anonymous
27th November 2019
Wednesday 10:09 am
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>>432220
I refer to .gs IRL as "this forum I post on".
>> No. 432222 Anonymous
27th November 2019
Wednesday 10:11 am
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>>432220
I knew a girl who'd tell jokes and stories she'd read on acrobat, framing them as though they were things that had happened to or been said by her friends.
>> No. 432223 Anonymous
27th November 2019
Wednesday 2:31 pm
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The chap at the Job Centre was all "why don't you want to use social media to look for work?" and while I gave him a couple of reasons I feel like I shortchanged him by forgetting about the Shamanismic State bot accounts.
>> No. 432224 Anonymous
27th November 2019
Wednesday 2:35 pm
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>>432220

>sounds a lot better than "an anonymous britfag said x"


You don't quite know that until you've tried it.

That said, I've gotten mixed responses when telling people that I post on an imageboard regularly. Places like 4chan have created a bad reputation for imageboards in general that is difficult to dispel. You kind of have to assure people that you're not a socially awkward neckbeard. Or a paedo. Or a socially awkward neckbeard paedo.
>> No. 432226 Anonymous
27th November 2019
Wednesday 2:57 pm
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>>432224
Why are you telling people at all? Even amongst friends who I’ve known for a fact visit imageboards we all in the end agreed to a Mafia-esque code of silence on the matter.
>> No. 432227 Anonymous
27th November 2019
Wednesday 3:08 pm
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>>432223

I've honestly never found a really good job based either on vacancies they informed me about, or on their tips on how to find work on your own. The last time I was really unemployed and desperately needed work, they offered me a handful of shit, dead-end temp positions, a lot of which had not that much to do with my qualifications. One time, the woman at the job centre tried to talk me into a job as a logistics agent. Which sounds kind of fancy, depending on how you lean, but it really would have involved me running up and down an unheated warehouse from about 4am every day with an iPad and crossing off outgoing shipments. The pay was shit even by temping standards.

So I took it as an incentive to start looking for work on my own. And two months later, I actually began work as an account manager, handling that company's commercial clients. I cold called the company because I remembered that an old friend once talked about one of his acquaintances working there, and when I rang them, they told me that as a matter of fact, they were currently looking for new people with a sales and/or account management background.

Job centres might help you get or stay off the dole if you've got no other choice. But they won't help you advance your career in a meaningful way when you're unemployed. The real career opportunities are always of your own making.
>> No. 432228 Anonymous
27th November 2019
Wednesday 5:35 pm
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>>432227

I've often remarked that our benefits bill would be a lot smaller if we stopped paying all those useless twats to sit behind a desk and ask other useless twats how many jobs they'd applied for that week. They're less than useless.

Then again, they're not really supposed to be there to help people like you "advance" their career. They're supposed to be there to help people who struggle to find work get into a job. I've known plenty of people who, for want of a better term, I'd definitely describe as useless. Not just lazy, not exactly disabled, just people who slipped through the cracks and ended up as a NEET, without being able to dig themselves out of it. Middle aged lads who used to work on a construction yard but can't since their back started playing up; and now they lack even the most rudimentary knowledge of how to apply for other types of job.

Those people are who the job centre should be there to help. And instead it's not. It's just full of useless admin cunts who are more of a waste of money than the benefits they're supposed to be keeping down.
>> No. 432231 Anonymous
27th November 2019
Wednesday 6:57 pm
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>>432227
Well, as a retard with no experience looking for work they've been reasonably helpful. With the exception of the very nice woman who I had my original appointment with who gave me all sorts of misleading information, but was very nice while doing it so it's hard to be too pissed off with her.
>The real career oppotunities are always of your own making.
That's more or less the advice I've been given at the Job Centre. I imagine like so many things in the world where you rely on someone in a de-facto position of authority it's dumb luck whether or not you get a bumbling nitwit, a mean-spirited malignant or in my case a normal person with a background in interviewing job candidates.

>>432228
>Not just lazy, not exactly disabled, just people who slipped through the cracks and ended up as a NEET
Do you mind if I use this on my CV?
>> No. 432237 Anonymous
28th November 2019
Thursday 12:38 pm
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>>432228

>I've often remarked that our benefits bill would be a lot smaller if we stopped paying all those useless twats to sit behind a desk and ask other useless twats how many jobs they'd applied for that week. They're less than useless.


On the other hand, doing away with them would mean that there would be even more dole fiends who can't be arsed to do even the simplest of jobs and no longer be a burden on public finances. Somebody needs to keep reminding them that they are living off other people's money for as long as they aren't back in gainful employment.

So I believe that even the most disinterested, unqualified, mean-spirited Job Centre agent still serves a purpose. You just shouldn't make the mistake of thinking they're career counsellors in a traditional sense when you've hit a bump in the road in your upwardly mobile middle management career. Most of them will be completely out of their depth when it comes to that, and yet, they will desperately and dishonestly try to appear competent.

And when I was unemployed, not only did they try to put me in that above mentioned unheated warehouse for £8 an hour (this was near enough in the middle of winter), but they also suggested I should take a course in sales management. I then told them that that was precisely what I had been doing for a living every day of the week for the past six years, but the woman only said, "Great, then that means it'll be easy for you, and you'll stay up on it". To her credit, at least it wasn't a beginner's course, but glancing at the printout she handed me, it took me less than one minute to realise that they couldn't have taught me anything that I didn't already know. I was then given the whole litany of things they could do if I was refusing to be cooperative, and the whole what-have-you. That's when I really realised that the only real way out of being unemployed was to take every bit of action all on my own.

All that said, I'm happy that for the foreseeable future, I have left the office slave world behind me and have started my own estate business. I firmly believe that I've shown that I've got the right kind of self reliance that is needed to be successful as a self-employed estate agent. My business is starting just now, but already I love the fact that I am working from home, and that I get to go to my office downstairs in my pyjama every morning, as it were. No grumpy boss, no chatty coworkers, no office politics. I'm living the dream.
>> No. 432238 Anonymous
28th November 2019
Thursday 1:09 pm
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>>432237

>You just shouldn't make the mistake of thinking they're career counsellors in a traditional sense when you've hit a bump in the road in your upwardly mobile middle management career. Most of them will be completely out of their depth when it comes to that, and yet, they will desperately and dishonestly try to appear competent.

I realise that my experience is the exception, but the job centre woman I had while I was in this position and trying to switch sectors was very good, very clever, and very supportive. Though now that I think about it she did constantly recommend me civil service jobs, presumably because she was a civil servant and lacked imagination. She was quite fit though.
>> No. 432239 Anonymous
28th November 2019
Thursday 1:31 pm
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I lived in Wales back when I was claiming benefits.

I cannot make sense of anyone's experiences here, and don't know how to respond other than with: my advisors were decidedly not clever, helpful, or fit.
>> No. 432240 Anonymous
28th November 2019
Thursday 2:23 pm
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>>432239

I was going to make the usual snide remark about Wales, but then again, my dealings were with the Job Centre here in Manchester, and it led to the experience I described above.
>> No. 432241 Anonymous
28th November 2019
Thursday 3:43 pm
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>>432237

>On the other hand, doing away with them would mean that there would be even more dole fiends who can't be arsed to do even the simplest of jobs and no longer be a burden on public finances.

Nah, I simply don't believe this is the case. Our current benefits system isn't enough to live a life of luxury, and anyone who believes people sincerely do this by choice is a dickhead.

There are people who do it because they're hopeless wastes of space, but we should let them, because having another gormless wanker behind the tills at Tesco doesn't help the economy much either. I enjoyed being dolescum briefly when I was about 23 and had all sorts of drug issues, but I was living at home with parents who worked and bought all my food. If I'd have been in a council flat making that £70 scrape out across two weeks of food and bills, I'd enjoy it a lot less.

The one exception is single mums who get given houses and enough money to look after their three kids, but then simply let the kids grow up malnourished and poorly clothed instead of spending the money on what it's meant for. But I keep getting told it's fascist of me to want the introduction of child licenses.

Those lot behind the desks cost us £5.6 billion a year.

>self-employed estate agent

Oh right, it's you again. Are you real or are you one of otherlad's roleplay characters?
>> No. 432242 Anonymous
28th November 2019
Thursday 4:21 pm
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>>432241

>Our current benefits system isn't enough to live a life of luxury, and anyone who believes people sincerely do this by choice is a dickhead


No, it's not a life of luxury, but you can scrape out a minimal living that way. It does mean you have to rely on shit, low-quality food every day and you won't have money for new clothes or amenities, but it can be done. And you'll have to do a few dodgy things on the side to raise extra money.

But with a ready supply of cheap beer and other alcohol, you'll be able to settle into that kind of life and be relatively happy with it.

At least that's what the average person will be forgiven for inferring from all the poverty porn documentaries on TV.
>> No. 432243 Anonymous
28th November 2019
Thursday 5:50 pm
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>>432242

I mean that's the thing. If you're going to spend your whole life living on that kind of diet, and the most you can look forward to is a few tinnies and fags from under the counter at the Polish shop, I don't see how you can begrudge them it.

These people are certainly costing the country a lot less than companies like Google, Amazon, Facebook et al are siphoning out of the economy every year. It's alright to pretend you object to dolescum living off somebody else's money, as if that's the real reason you dislike it, but frankly I prefer it when people just admit they hate poor people.
>> No. 432244 Anonymous
28th November 2019
Thursday 6:24 pm
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I love my girlfriend to death but last night she picked a weird place to go dogging.

She tried claiming that she, a privately educated, daughter of a reasonably well off university educated man, who will give her 70k for a house deposit (and to his other children), who also has a well off, university educated mum and sounds like she is as working class and me, a state school educated northerner, with parents with no formal qualifications.

Her rationale? I like Radio 4 in the morning and because my job is a traditionally middle class job I'm practically no different from landed gentry.

It wasn't even in an aggressive way, or a defensive way (i.e. I said she was lucky to be middle class), we just got randomly talking and she was adamant that was the case.
>> No. 432245 Anonymous
28th November 2019
Thursday 6:25 pm
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>>432244
sounds like she is, is as working class as me*
>> No. 432246 Anonymous
28th November 2019
Thursday 6:29 pm
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>>432244

Sounds like you're middle class now so she's right.
>> No. 432248 Anonymous
28th November 2019
Thursday 6:31 pm
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>>432244

>but last night she picked a weird place to go dogging

I hate when that happens. You've got to stick to the popular locations.
>> No. 432250 Anonymous
28th November 2019
Thursday 7:18 pm
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>>432244

>I love my girlfriend to death but last night she picked a weird place to go dogging.


POTFY, m4t.
>> No. 432251 Anonymous
28th November 2019
Thursday 7:32 pm
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>>432250
Agreed - I can't quite discern the beef as I think there are a couple of words missing from >>432244 rant/cry for help and what She is claiming, but as posts go, that is POTY territory on the opening line.
>> No. 432252 Anonymous
28th November 2019
Thursday 9:35 pm
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>>432251

>but as posts go, that is POTY territory on the opening line.


We should start a collection, so that zingers like that one aren't forgotten.
>> No. 432253 Anonymous
28th November 2019
Thursday 9:51 pm
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>>432252
Revengelad would only use them against us.
>> No. 432254 Anonymous
29th November 2019
Friday 12:28 am
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>>432251
It's a word filter for a phrase you lot were overusing a few months back.
>> No. 432255 Anonymous
29th November 2019
Friday 12:35 am
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>>432254
Care to shed some light?
>> No. 432256 Anonymous
29th November 2019
Friday 12:38 am
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>>432255
No but you just gave me a profound sense of deja vu.
>> No. 432258 Anonymous
29th November 2019
Friday 12:57 am
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>>432256
Care to shed some light?
>> No. 432259 Anonymous
29th November 2019
Friday 12:58 am
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>>432244

Aside from the mystery wordfilter this really could have been written by me.

You can scratch and claw to make life a a bit better for yourself, and everyone -- even people you like -- will pretend you must have been on an even footing all along. This is one of the ways that working class experience is erased.

I handle it with far less humour and grace than you seem to.
>> No. 432260 Anonymous
29th November 2019
Friday 1:31 am
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>>432259
You get angry with people who think you fit in to the place you are now?
>> No. 432262 Anonymous
29th November 2019
Friday 3:49 am
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>>432260

The point is that denying the struggle of working class folk to ascend the social hierarchy is part of the reason our class system is so entrenched and hard to escape.

Every time someone does succeed, the people who are already comfortably middle class will trivialise what it took for that person- Partly because they don't want to admit that they had a leg up, therefore diminishing their own achievement; and partly because there's a primal sense of guilt about the fact that some people simply have a harder life than others and that we're largely too selfish to meaningfully address it.

Middle class folk would prefer to turn the other cheek and focus on things that don't make them feel personally guilty. Like the environment. It gets very frustrating as someone who fought tooth and nail to get where they are, how people who got there very easily just sort of dismiss it as though it doesn't matter.

In before otherlad comes in to tell us it's dead easy if we get over our crustacean bucket mindsets and start a real estate business
>> No. 432266 Anonymous
29th November 2019
Friday 9:47 am
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>>432259
You'd rather every conversation was prefaced with 'given your working class upbringing'

"Given your working class upbringing, you're doing a great job"
"Given your working class upbringing, your kids are great"
"Given your working class upbringing, I'll have a pint, please"

The other extreme, clearly, but what do you actually want? How are people supposed to put into context something they may not even know about, probably don't care about, and something which they may see as profoundly irrelevant to the moment? They're dealing with the now-you, just as they deal with the now-everyone-else.
>> No. 432268 Anonymous
29th November 2019
Friday 10:42 am
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>>432266
I don't think he's saying that, I think what he's saying is, people are quick to play it down or make out like their much more privileged upbringing was really all no different to yours. Probably doesn't want anything, other than for people not to be obnoxious about it.

Like with my girlfriend in the original post I made, it literally changes nothing about our relationship, the evening or the practicalities of her life but she was determined to make out like I was as middle class as her or, perhaps more absurdly, she was as working class as me.

Special thanks to the mods for shitting all over my glory by pointing out it was a word filter and not my impeccable sense of humour in the first post.
>> No. 432269 Anonymous
29th November 2019
Friday 10:54 am
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>>432266
>How are people supposed to put into context something they may not even know about, probably don't care about, and something which they may see as profoundly irrelevant to the moment?

It comes out in the course of getting to know anyone. You can't be in a close relationship, for example, and not have your background become apparent. At some point you start sharing the experiences that shaped you as a person.

Even with colleagues or new faces, just politely answering questions as basic as "where do you come from" and "how did you end up working here" will sometimes lead to uncomfortable realisations for everyone, without even intending it.

The irony of your post is that it's other people that tend to notice your class, even in the "now-you". What's more, they'll bring the details out of you with questions, then downplay it and say it couldn't have been so bad since you "made it here".

About why people should care, well, why care about anyone's life? You could be close to them, you could like them, you could see it as a matter of fairness, or it could just be compassion.

As for what I want... Honestly I just want a bit of understanding from those who are close to me that I've sacrificed a lot and taken some big risks just to get to the point of material security where they started. Or some recognition that, in this particular light, they may have had some considerable advantages. It's hard to be more specific than that without bringing up real life exchanges I've had with people.
>> No. 432271 Anonymous
29th November 2019
Friday 11:52 am
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>>432266

This is a much broader and more abstract social phenomena that doesn't just come down to individual people. All he's asking for, in essence, is for middle class or otherwise more advantaged people to check their privilege. Let's pretend we're talking about race instead.

>You'd rather every conversation was prefaced with 'given the colour of your skin'

>"Given the colour of your skin, you're doing a great job"
>"Given the colour of your skin, your kids are great"
>"Given the colour of your skin, I'll have a pint, please"

Obviously no brown-eyed people have ever wanted that, but what they did want is for society at large to realise that they have a harder time of it because of the invisible systems and hierarchies of privilege. Over the last fifty or so years, we have mostly addressed those problems; but class division is still very real.
>> No. 432272 Anonymous
29th November 2019
Friday 12:11 pm
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Do you lads want some fish to go with that massive chip on your shoulder?
>> No. 432273 Anonymous
29th November 2019
Friday 12:46 pm
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>>432272
Fish!? When I were a lad we couldn't afford fish with our chippy tea.
>> No. 432280 Anonymous
29th November 2019
Friday 6:13 pm
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>>432269

>The irony of your post is that it's other people that tend to notice your class, even in the "now-you".

You'll never fully shed the markings of the social class you come from and which you grew up in. Even if you go to a posh university and make it into a boardroom somewhere, there will always be that lingering, self-perceived deficit that you feel you have because you didn't grow up the same way as your present-day peers who came from money.

In the end, it's a matter of debate if people really consciously point out class differences between their upbringing and yours to you, or if it's just you being hypervigilant and getting defensive even at the slightest hint of it, because instinctively you know you'll never fully be one of "them".



https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EMVqIISyp60
>> No. 432281 Anonymous
29th November 2019
Friday 7:22 pm
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>>43228
>In the end, it's a matter of debate if people really consciously point out class differences between their upbringing and yours to you

That's not what I was saying. What I pointed out was that people ask me questions, I give them factual answers (e.g., no I didn't receive sums of money when I reached big life milestones, yes I do have immediate relatives who have been to prison, yes there were times money was very tight as a child, no I'm not set to inherit anything), then them deliberately attempting to underplay the factual answers I give them. I've had people erase the first twenty-odd years of my life because I've got to a decent place.

I'm not hoping to "blend in", and I don't perceive myself as inferior because of my upbringing. What I would like is for people not to dismiss my experiences, especially when they're the ones that ask about them. These seem like such different things that I'm not even sure you really read my post.
>> No. 432283 Anonymous
29th November 2019
Friday 8:42 pm
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>>432281

>no I didn't receive sums of money when I reached big life milestones

Neither did I, and I'm from an upper middle class upbringing myself.


>yes I do have immediate relatives who have been to prison

Not going to argue that poverty and prison don't correlate, but I dated a lass briefly whose uncle was a tax lawyer, and at that time, he was in prison somewhere in the Caribbean (some tax haven that I can't remember the name of) for money laundering, awaiting extradition to Britain. Yes, I know, that's not the same as some dolescum thug going to prison for nicking cars because he doesn't know any better, but my point is, it's not something that only happens to poorer people.


>no I'm not set to inherit anything

Even if you are, that doesn't mean you'll always have it. A lot of those trust fund rich kids, I mean the really rich ones, run out of money before they know what hit them, because they never had to work for money and thus never appreciated it and realised that you need to take good care of it or you'll just piss it away.


>and I don't perceive myself as inferior because of my upbringing

And you aren't. I know a few people who came from humble beginnings, and some are the nicest human beings you'll meet.
>> No. 432287 Anonymous
29th November 2019
Friday 9:48 pm
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9781847844279-uk.jpg
432287432287432287
If I buy an old Ordnance Survey map like this will it be something I'd be able to open out and frame or would it be like a book across a number of pages? Thinking of ordering one as a present for someone.
>> No. 432288 Anonymous
29th November 2019
Friday 11:53 pm
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>>432287

It'll be a fold-out sheet, but the size depends on the type of map.

https://maps.nls.uk/orders-sizes.html
>> No. 432289 Anonymous
30th November 2019
Saturday 4:33 am
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>>432283
>it's not something that only happens to poorer people.

All of this happens on sliding scale with socioeconomic status, as shown by decades of research. It's not that it doesn't happen to middle class people, it's that it happens less frequently, or happens differently due to having the protection a bit of money or education provides.

I was just giving examples of questions that have led to awkward conversations with people I know. Some even try to joke about it, as though to make a point how far removed my experiences are from theirs. As another poster pointed out, it does get obnoxious.

Regardless, I suspected it was a bad idea, precisely because someone like you always pops up and points out an exception and ignores the overwhelming evidence for things as simple as: middle class kids tend to benefit more from intergenerational exchange of wealth, they tend to have fewer relatives in prison, they tend to be in better health, they tend to be more educated, they tend to have a better grasp of how to navigate institutions, they tend to be better connected to other middle class folk, etc..

These tendencies have been reflected prettyy accurately, in my experience, even though anyone can think of exceptions -- of which I'm probably one.
>> No. 432291 Anonymous
30th November 2019
Saturday 5:36 am
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>>432288
Thanks, lad. I've had a look online and it says the Alan Godfrey maps generally cover one and a half miles by one mile, at a scale of 15 inches to the mile.
>> No. 432292 Anonymous
30th November 2019
Saturday 9:07 am
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>>432283
>Even if you are, that doesn't mean you'll always have it. A lot of those trust fund rich kids, I mean the really rich ones, run out of money before they know what hit them, because they never had to work for money and thus never appreciated it and realised that you need to take good care of it or you'll just piss it away.

Sorry but this is untrue. I think maybe you're thinking of lottery winners? If I were wealthy I'd want people to believe this was the case but the facts are two thirds of all wealth is inherited. Most rich people were simply given most of their money and the richer you are the more likely this is to be the case.
>> No. 432293 Anonymous
30th November 2019
Saturday 9:41 am
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>>432288
Yeah - I've got quite a few of those older OS maps. They are nice things (I collect maps BTW) but they're not quite at the level you could flatten and frame them. You can sometimes find map shops that have flattened them for you.
>> No. 432296 Anonymous
30th November 2019
Saturday 11:32 am
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>>432287

Alan Godfrey Maps offer some of their colour prints as a flat sheet, posted rolled up in a tube - you could try giving them a ring on 01207 583388 and ask if they can do others like that.
>> No. 432297 Anonymous
30th November 2019
Saturday 11:45 am
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>>432289

You're not wrong, in that there is a divide between the poor and the middle class that is difficult to overcome, and getting more difficult in our time, it seems:


https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/education-44489556

>For those people born between 1955 and 1975, the research says, social mobility was a "reality", with people born into low-income families able to move up in terms of education and earnings.

>But the OECD study suggests that those born afterwards, becoming adults in the 1990s and later, faced "stagnating" social mobility.

>Researchers found a high likelihood of people being "stuck" in the income group into which they were born, with those born into poorer families likely to remain poor and those from high-income families going on to become high earners themselves.
>> No. 432298 Anonymous
30th November 2019
Saturday 3:12 pm
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>>432297
Bring back grammar schools.
>> No. 432299 Anonymous
30th November 2019
Saturday 4:01 pm
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>>432293
Is that because of creasing? If so then I'd imagine ironing them on the lowest setting underneath a few pillowcases or tea towels could sort that out.
>> No. 432300 Anonymous
30th November 2019
Saturday 4:32 pm
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>>432299

Tea towel with just a touch of steam at the lowest heat setting and you should be golden. But make sure you allow the spots you're ironing to cool down in between passes.
>> No. 432665 Anonymous
9th December 2019
Monday 10:38 pm
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I was entirely unaware that Alanis Morrissette was still alive.


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DrC8AEWO3-8
>> No. 432666 Anonymous
10th December 2019
Tuesday 1:04 am
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>>432665
It's like rain on your wedding day
>> No. 432667 Anonymous
10th December 2019
Tuesday 1:25 am
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>>432665
She looks quite MILF-tastic now. Fully approve.
>> No. 432669 Anonymous
10th December 2019
Tuesday 11:02 am
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Big ups to the poor bastard window cleaners doing the rounds this morning. I hope they get a higher rate in this weather.
>> No. 432691 Anonymous
10th December 2019
Tuesday 8:46 pm
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>>432667

I don't know, she looks more like my mum's mentally unstable saucy friend who has been telling rude jokes at teatime since we were little.
>> No. 432692 Anonymous
10th December 2019
Tuesday 9:38 pm
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>>432691

You say that like it's a bad thing.
>> No. 432710 Anonymous
12th December 2019
Thursday 1:50 am
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I’m staying up late to watch a film called #horror that’s about 12 year old girls having a party and using social media. Honestly the late night film lucky dip is the best way to experience cinema, you just don’t know what’s going to happen.
>> No. 432711 Anonymous
12th December 2019
Thursday 2:48 am
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>>432710
> a film [...] that’s about 12 year old girls having a party and using social media

Honestly, pedolad, you could try to be a little more subtle.

I kid, I kid.

Is anyone going to throw my coat at me?
>> No. 432713 Anonymous
12th December 2019
Thursday 8:57 am
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>>432711

Not that someone isn't a despicable human being to begin with if they are attracted to 12-year-olds, but have you actually spent time with girls that age? One of my friends has a 12- and a 14-year-old daughter, and although they can be adorable, whenever I visit my friend and stay for a while, I can only feel sorry for him because they just do your fucking head in. All the drama and cattiness, and that.

I kind of hope that when I have kids, it will be two or three boys. Coming from a family of boys myself, I know that all the tussling and assertive behaviour aren't easy, but I think my brother and I were much easier on our parents than many girls seem to be.
>> No. 432722 Anonymous
12th December 2019
Thursday 11:13 am
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>>432711
Really though it didn't feel great to be sat in the dark watching pre-teens go for a swim. The film was also a complete mess, but it's definitely going to stick with me.

>>432713
They might be worse as kids but once they're grown up at least you don't have to worry about them being murderers and rapists, it's swings and roundabouts.
>> No. 432724 Anonymous
12th December 2019
Thursday 12:14 pm
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https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vSzjbnhZKS4
>> No. 432726 Anonymous
12th December 2019
Thursday 12:24 pm
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>>432722

>at least you don't have to worry about them being murderers and rapists


Fuck christ, genderlad. Have some perspective.
>> No. 432727 Anonymous
12th December 2019
Thursday 1:28 pm
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432727432727432727
>>432722
>> No. 432728 Anonymous
12th December 2019
Thursday 5:15 pm
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>>432727

https://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-3485528/Two-Preston-14-year-old-twin-sisters-known-Boom-Girls-given-Asbos-SIX-years-tormenting-local-community.html
>> No. 432729 Anonymous
12th December 2019
Thursday 5:32 pm
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>>432728
No way the maw isn't on bennies.
>> No. 432731 Anonymous
12th December 2019
Thursday 9:00 pm
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>>432728

Validates my point >>432713 from earlier today, even if in a closed-minded, Daily Mail-reading cunt kind of way.
>> No. 432733 Anonymous
12th December 2019
Thursday 11:50 pm
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My youtube app keeps suggesting videos to me both on autism and on things women find attractive in a man. What am I supposed to read into that.
>> No. 432734 Anonymous
12th December 2019
Thursday 11:52 pm
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>>432733
Depends. Tell us what you're good at? Are you a woman?
>> No. 432735 Anonymous
13th December 2019
Friday 2:35 am
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>>432724

Am I a bad man for finding this 12yo woman reasonably attractive?
>> No. 432737 Anonymous
13th December 2019
Friday 2:54 am
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I think I might have accidentally overdosed. I don't think I'll die, but I'll have a fucking atrocious headache in the morning.
>> No. 432738 Anonymous
13th December 2019
Friday 8:01 am
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>>432737
Did you die?
>> No. 432739 Anonymous
13th December 2019
Friday 8:06 am
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>>432738

Not yet.
>> No. 432808 Anonymous
16th December 2019
Monday 8:11 am
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Sat having a shit at work, thinking about how you could easily smuggle drugs into an airport via the pipes. Maybe little drones that crawl or swim around in the water pipes and pop out in the bogs. Of course then you'd have to do the same in the other country to be safe, maybe you'd just flush it then with a GPS tracker on it.

Only problem would be the amount of product you could shift with tiny water drones.
>> No. 432810 Anonymous
16th December 2019
Monday 1:18 pm
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After less than a week of exercising my shoulders have stopped making glacia noises when I stretch them. Go me!
>> No. 432814 Anonymous
16th December 2019
Monday 6:03 pm
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I'll be alone in Donny tomorrow with five hours to kill. Anything to do for a loner in Doncaster City centre?
>> No. 432815 Anonymous
16th December 2019
Monday 6:16 pm
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>>432814

I had to change trains there once and just being there for five minutes left me scarred for month. I imagine it's easier to kill yourself than five hours in Donny.

Sorry, lad. Hopefully someone will give you a decent answer soon. I had to spend eight hours on my tod in Leeds once and basically I went into smith's, bought a load of magazines and went and sat in a pub. Yes I'm a sad git.
>> No. 432818 Anonymous
16th December 2019
Monday 6:52 pm
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>>432814
I've had to kill time in Doncaster once, many years ago, and I have no recollection of the place beyond the bus station. If you like planes then I think they've got an air museum. You could always try Donny Dome if you fancy some chav fanny.

If you're lucky you may see a bit of public nudity.

https://www.doncasterfreepress.co.uk/news/picture-naked-woman-strolls-through-doncaster-town-centre-broad-daylight-59014

https://www.thestar.co.uk/news/half-naked-man-spotted-eating-lunch-doncaster-bus-stop-45043

https://www.doncasterfreepress.co.uk/news/shocking-picture-couple-caught-having-sex-public-doncaster-town-centre-63458
>> No. 432823 Anonymous
16th December 2019
Monday 7:32 pm
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>>432814
Get the train to Beeston!
>> No. 432824 Anonymous
16th December 2019
Monday 8:15 pm
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>>432823

Beeston > Beeston.
>> No. 432826 Anonymous
16th December 2019
Monday 9:45 pm
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>>432824

Agreed, but only if you need a prostitute or bad coke at short notice.

I miss Winstons.
>> No. 432829 Anonymous
17th December 2019
Tuesday 4:51 pm
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Doncaster is a total shithole. Worse than Bradford.
>> No. 432830 Anonymous
17th December 2019
Tuesday 9:08 pm
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>>432829

You clearly haven't been to places like Middlesbrough.
>> No. 432831 Anonymous
17th December 2019
Tuesday 9:14 pm
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Today at work someone who retired two years ago popped in for a visit. His wife has left him and he looked like an absolute shell of a man. I've heard it's fairly common amongst retired couples once they're together all of the time with little respite.
>> No. 432832 Anonymous
17th December 2019
Tuesday 9:19 pm
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>>432829

Tell me about Bradford's Metal legacy.
Consider this in the context of Doncaster's impact on adolescent mental health.
>> No. 432836 Anonymous
18th December 2019
Wednesday 11:43 am
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Almost had sex with an Airbnb guest. Am I a prostitute if I do? Feels kind of unethical.
>> No. 432837 Anonymous
18th December 2019
Wednesday 1:10 pm
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>>432836

Was (s)he fit?
>> No. 432838 Anonymous
18th December 2019
Wednesday 1:19 pm
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>>432837

I wouldn't have done it if she wasn't attractive.
>> No. 432840 Anonymous
18th December 2019
Wednesday 1:53 pm
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>>432835 

A shag is a shag, even if it's with a complete munter.
>> No. 432846 Anonymous
18th December 2019
Wednesday 6:54 pm
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My car failed MOT today, despite me spending six hours yesterday changing all the front wishbones. Apparently, the rear left brake disc is buggered, from when the brake caliper seized up earler this year.

First time ever that I had one of my cars failing MOT. My pride is hurt.
>> No. 432852 Anonymous
18th December 2019
Wednesday 9:36 pm
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>>432846

I feel your pain, but it's your own fault, how did you put all that work in and not even think to have a quick look at the brakes?

I'm not angry, I'm just disappointed.
>> No. 432853 Anonymous
18th December 2019
Wednesday 9:39 pm
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>>432837
She just booked another three nights. That's it. I'm officially a sex worker.
>> No. 432854 Anonymous
18th December 2019
Wednesday 9:48 pm
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>>432853
If you don't shag her she'll probably give you a poor rating.
>> No. 432856 Anonymous
18th December 2019
Wednesday 9:59 pm
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>>432854
If I shag her and she still gives me a poor rating my self esteem is going to be really fucked.
>> No. 432857 Anonymous
18th December 2019
Wednesday 10:23 pm
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>>432852

The damage to the brakes wasn't that obvious to the naked eye. There was apparently more wear to the rear left brake disc due to the seized caliper, the latter of which I swapped out for a brand new one this spring, but it really looked fine, despite there arguably being a bit less left on the brake pads than on the right side.

They told me that the brake force on a wheel needs to be within 20 percent of the other wheel on the same axle. MOT lad tried to be nice to me and made several attempts, more than I've seen them do anyway, but he was unable to get both rear brakes to end up within that 20-percent band relative to each other. The best reading he was able to get was about a difference of just under 30 percent.

He said that in normal traffic, it shouldn't matter and a difference of 30 percent is not an accident waiting to happen as such. But that the car could swerve to one side at high speed in an emergency braking manoeuvre, and that therefore rules are rules, and that 30 percent difference was too far outside the acceptable band to let it slide.
>> No. 432858 Anonymous
18th December 2019
Wednesday 11:07 pm
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>>432840

You eat out at cheap all you can eat buffets that barely pass their hygiene rating don't you?
>> No. 432861 Anonymous
19th December 2019
Thursday 10:30 am
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Jodie Kidd talking about spending ten years going to the beach and jogging to sort out her anxiety is making me want to kill myself. The rich are beyond clueless, so are the poor, but they don’t get fawning TV interviews.
>> No. 432862 Anonymous
19th December 2019
Thursday 10:44 am
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>>432861

>ten years going to the beach and jogging to sort out her anxiety

>The rich are beyond clueless


Going to the beach costs money since when?
>> No. 432865 Anonymous
19th December 2019
Thursday 4:14 pm
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>>432856
I'm already looking forward to the rest of this story.
>> No. 432868 Anonymous
19th December 2019
Thursday 8:22 pm
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>>432862
If you're close enough to a beach to walk there and still be able to jog, your home is probably really expensive. Otherwise, if you can afford the time to travel to the beach, have a decent session, and travel back, all on a daily basis, then you're probably not working full time. I live in a port city, but it's still about 20-30 minutes drive to the nearest reliably-runnable beach.
>> No. 432869 Anonymous
19th December 2019
Thursday 9:46 pm
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>>432868

Shithole coastal towns around the UK would like a word with you lad.
>> No. 432870 Anonymous
19th December 2019
Thursday 9:51 pm
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>>432868

I lived just outside Sunderland for almost two years, and although my flat was not in one of the nicer beachfront neighbourhoods, it was less than ten minutes from the water by car. I hate running, cycling is much more my type of thing, but it would have been well feasible for me to get in my car every other night after work and go for jog along Whitburn Bay.
>> No. 432871 Anonymous
19th December 2019
Thursday 10:06 pm
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>>432868
£425/month bedsit m8, in the summer i cross a main road barefoot and onto the beach in 90 seconds.
>> No. 432872 Anonymous
19th December 2019
Thursday 10:09 pm
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>>432871

The dream.
>> No. 432876 Anonymous
19th December 2019
Thursday 10:38 pm
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>>432871
Fucking posho.
>> No. 432877 Anonymous
19th December 2019
Thursday 11:15 pm
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Watching Independence Day on TV at the moment.

How computer illiterate did the makers of that film think their audience would be when they had Jeff Goldblum jam the computers of the alien mother ship with a human-made virus?

If the aliens had ships sophisticated enough to cross the galaxy, then surely their computers weren't so poorly designed that all it took was some earthling hacking them with just a few lines of code thrown together, and in a programming language that was presumably going to be unlike anything we have here on Earth.

This is why nobody enjoys watching movies with me
>> No. 432878 Anonymous
19th December 2019
Thursday 11:17 pm
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>>432877
I thought they gave the aliens a computer cold rather than a virus?
>> No. 432879 Anonymous
19th December 2019
Thursday 11:39 pm
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>>432877

It was the early 90s, computers might as well have still been magic to most people.
>> No. 432883 Anonymous
20th December 2019
Friday 1:51 am
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>>432877

It takes me several weeks to reverse-engineer a bit of Chinese IoT tat. I wouldn't even know where to begin with an alien computer. Would they use the von Neumann architecture? Would they have moved on to photonics or quantum computing? Would they even use binary logic?
>> No. 432884 Anonymous
20th December 2019
Friday 2:02 am
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>>432877
It's supposed to be a modern day version of how the germs in War of the Worlds kill the tripods, I think. No, it doesn't make sense, but that's because it was written by Dean Devlin and Roland Emerich, who have the combined IQ of the proverbial rock and a hard place.

I don't even know what that means, but it's still cleverer than anything they've committed to film.
>> No. 432885 Anonymous
20th December 2019
Friday 3:10 am
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>>432877
IIRC they mention that the alien ship they use to deliver the virus is one that crashed in Roswell. That's 50 years they had to study the alien technology.
>> No. 432886 Anonymous
20th December 2019
Friday 3:36 am
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>>432877
>If the aliens had ships sophisticated enough to cross the galaxy, then surely their computers weren't so poorly designed that all it took was some earthling hacking them with just a few lines of code thrown together

That ... really isn't how that works.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cluster_(spacecraft)#Launch_failure
>> No. 432887 Anonymous
20th December 2019
Friday 5:03 am
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>>432886

Was that spacecraft going to cross the galaxy?
>> No. 432889 Anonymous
20th December 2019
Friday 9:26 am
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>>432885
Not him but that's actually a decent explanation of that particular plot hole.

Still, they wouldn't have known they needed to whip up a virus until the motherships arrived - how much time did they have then? A day? I can't remember if this is shown in the film.
>> No. 432890 Anonymous
20th December 2019
Friday 9:55 am
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>>432885

>IIRC they mention that the alien ship they use to deliver the virus is one that crashed in Roswell. That's 50 years they had to study the alien technology.

Small problem there, as the U.S. government in the film kept the crashed ship secret from everybody including the President and David Levinson (Jeff Goldblum's character). So effectively, even if the inner circles of government scientists had a pretty good idea how the ship's computer worked from years of studying it, he only had hours to familiarise himself with the system and how to come up with a virus to jam it.

War of the Worlds was similarly flawed in that respect, and it could be attributed as well to limited popular knowledge about viruses in 1898 when it was first published. For germs that cause disease in humans to work the same way and much worse in aliens, you have to make a fair amount of assumptions about biological similarities between us and an alien species. Then again, it's less far fetched than the computer virus in Independence Day, if you subscribe to the idea that life on Earth started from simple organisms that were brought here by meteorite impacts. If most life in the Universe is based on the same principle of self-replicating DNA, then it could be that germs found on Earth can cause harm to alien life forms. And the other way round really, i.e. a contact with aliens could wipe us out if they carry germs that are harmful to humans.
>> No. 432897 Anonymous
20th December 2019
Friday 1:05 pm
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>>432890



I think the original War of the Worlds concept is more sound than the computer virus one, because the pendulum swings both ways, as long as we assume the fundamental concepts are similar. And the scientific consensus is indeed that if we do find life out there, the odds are it will share more similarities than differences, in terms of raw biological mechanics.

Alien viruses or microbes might be utterly inert to human biology- But on the other hand, there might be some kind of prion which coincidentally binds with every cell membrane in the human body and turns a person into a pile of barely sentient jelly. Biology is a lot more delicate than an operating system.

We know from Earth biology that diseases which cross the species barrier can be much more harmful to their new hosts, even when they have been almost symbiotic with the other species. Obviously we can't expect aliens to be as similar as monkeys to humans, or dogs to cattle; but it's perfectly plausible that a Martian common cold could be a human super-ebola.
>> No. 432900 Anonymous
20th December 2019
Friday 1:34 pm
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>>432897

If aliens aren't susceptible to viruses from Earth, which generally work by hijacking a cell's self replication mechanism by inserting their own DNA and thus propagating it, then they could still be susceptible to bacterial infections, which could more generally attack organic matter that alien life forms will presumably also consist of. So even if advanced alien life forms that come to visit us here are completely unlike multicellular animal or plant organisms found on Earth, maybe because they aren't cell- or DNA based, that does not necessarily mean they will be immune against our pathogens.

On the other hand, there's that famous experiment where you expose a water-based solution of basic organic compounds (which have been proven to exist all over the observable Universe) to a UV light source, and after a few hours you can watch self-replicating strings of aminoacids form in your test tube. If that is the basic principle of the creation of life and how it is triggered, then it could well be that the bodies of aliens originating from very distant corners of the Universe have DNA-filled cellular structures not much unlike the ones of all living organisms here on Earth.
>> No. 432903 Anonymous
20th December 2019
Friday 4:46 pm
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>>432885

Would someone from 1979 be able to hack a modern computer?
>> No. 432905 Anonymous
20th December 2019
Friday 5:12 pm
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>>432903

Some models / OSs, yes. The functionality and security of IBM's AIX hasn't changed much since System V UNIX, for example.
>> No. 432906 Anonymous
20th December 2019
Friday 5:14 pm
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>>432903
If they were given 50 years to study it, certainly. Have you missed the point?
>> No. 432907 Anonymous
20th December 2019
Friday 5:16 pm
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>>432903

Most computer code today is written in a so-called higher programming language, like C for example. C was devised in the early 70s, so someone with a good solid programming background trying to hack a modern computer would at least recognise certain very basic code structures that haven't changed much since 1979. The problem would be the lack of knowledge about all the programming languages and techniques that have been developed since, and really only share the most basic syntax patterns with 1979's C. And all the different applications that someone from 1979 would have no way of foreseeing, including all the hardware platforms that have emerged since then. Finding php vulnerabilities in a web site on a server might seem like a piece of piss to many bored script kiddies today, but try explaining the concept to someone with the level of computer knowledge that existed a good 14 years before the first web browsers even came into being.
>> No. 432909 Anonymous
20th December 2019
Friday 5:51 pm
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>>432907

The biggest single problem is that until the late 80's hacking was essentially just guessing passwords. Indeed it stayed that way until around the mid 90s (96, more or less?) for all but the best of the best.

Even if you took someone from 1979 who had good C knowledge, knowledge of ARPAnet (and bearing in mind that ARPAnet didn't switch to TCP/IP until '83), and (miraculously) a morrisworm level knowledge of security issues, then they'd still face the problems of DEP/ASLR/CFG/CET/CTI/ENDBR/shadow stacks etc that have been introduced over the last two decades. Unless you cheated and sat them down and tried to explain that now not only is the stack not executable but in fact only the code segment is executable, it's always at a random address and if you try to branch to any instruction other than ENDBR then the CPU will fault - then basically the only OS still in use that they might be able to hack would be AIX as it follows essentially the same security model as UNIX generally did in the late 70s and early 80s (even though it's based on SYSV ('83) and not BSD ('77) so that they'd still have to figure a ton of things out on their own.

Sage for writing a book that no cunt will ever read.
>> No. 432910 Anonymous
20th December 2019
Friday 6:03 pm
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>>432909

Probably a bit like getting a car mechanic from the 70s to fix your mid-2010s car. It's still recognisably a car, and they will probably still be able to change your brakes and tracking rods, but if you talk to them about ECU remapping or reading out fault codes with a laptop, then they'll struggle to understand what you're on about.

I think Rover actually introduced a very basic fault code system in the 70s though.
>> No. 432911 Anonymous
20th December 2019
Friday 6:06 pm
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>>432910
Electric cars will change all this even more - they're such different machines compared to ICE-driven vehicles.
>> No. 432913 Anonymous
20th December 2019
Friday 6:33 pm
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>>432911

Firemen are undergoing a huge amount of retraining at the moment, because cutting someone out of an electric vehicle is a completely different ballgame. Things can go horrendously wrong in a real hurry if you cut through a high voltage cable or (god forbid) part of the battery pack.
>> No. 432926 Anonymous
20th December 2019
Friday 9:04 pm
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>>432913

>if you cut through a high voltage cable

That's indeed a concern because the battery that drives the electric motor that propels a modern electric car usually operates at a voltage of some 400V. Some high-performance cars like the Porsche Taycan even run on 800V. This is done because higher voltage generally means less current is needed to deliver the same amount of watts, and thus electric cables can have smaller diameters and weigh less. Smaller currents are also an advantage when quick charging an electric car.
>> No. 432927 Anonymous
20th December 2019
Friday 9:17 pm
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>>432913>>432926
I wonder how long it will be until someone is electrocuted by their own car.

Aren't the battery packs quite volatile too? My limited understanding of chemistry is that you don't want water anywhere near lithium-based batteries.
>> No. 432929 Anonymous
20th December 2019
Friday 9:56 pm
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>>432927

>Aren't the battery packs quite volatile too?

They're extremely well armoured, but they'll spontaneously combust if they're punctured and they're very difficult to extinguish. EV batteries can also re-ignite many hours after they have been apparently extinguished. With that said, an EV is about ten times less likely to catch fire than a conventional vehicle, because it's not full of highly flammable liquid and hot engine components.

>>432926

There are equally serious hazards with a conventional vehicle, most notably the airbag detonators which are literally small bombs. The problem for firefighters is mostly a lack of familiarity - a pillar that is perfectly safe to cut on any conventional vehicle might contain a high-voltage cable on an EV. Haphazardly jacking up a conventional vehicle might warp the chassis, but haphazardly jacking an EV might cause a battery fire.
>> No. 432934 Anonymous
20th December 2019
Friday 11:27 pm
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>>432929

>most notably the airbag detonators

They can really pack a punch. If you enter the words "airbag blown up" or similar on youtube, you'll see a slew of videos where they connect an old airbag to a 12V battery and watch the exploding airbag cartridge launch a good 50 feet in the air.

I do many of my own repairs, and that has also involved removing airbags at times to remove the steering wheel. But always with a healthy dose of respect as to what could happen if you mishandle an airbag. It's actually illegal not allowed as such for a layman to fiddle with airbags, and even if you are a car mechanic, you have to visit a special training course where they teach you how to remove and reinstall them safely, before you will be allowed to do any of it at your workplace.

All that said, I once watched a mechanic remove and replace my airbag steering wheel with a keen eye, and apparently one of the key things is that you must not be sat in the car while removing the airbag. You have to do it while kneeling beside the car with at least the front doors open. And then some things like, leave the car with the battery disconnected for 15 minutes before you begin, so that any residual electric charges around the car can dissipate, then carefully disconnect it, and then slowly place the removed airbag on an anti static mat with the top side facing up.

Still not allowed for people like you and me, I know that full well.
>> No. 432937 Anonymous
21st December 2019
Saturday 8:50 am
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>>432934

Large-scale car recyclers use a CANBUS widget to set off all the airbags at once, which is fantastically impressive.

Also, don't be any of these dickheads:


>> No. 432940 Anonymous
21st December 2019
Saturday 12:16 pm
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>>432937

>Large-scale car recyclers use a CANBUS widget to set off all the airbags at once

This should be fairly easy to do, all you'd have to do is send a succession of bits over the CAN that mimics the data emitted by a crash sensor when there is an actual crash, and which then alerts an airbag control unit that it is supposed to detonate. The way CAN works, you have all the devices tied into it constantly listening for data messages coming down the bus that will be of interest to them. Sort of like when you've got the news on and you're patiently waiting for a news segment that interests you. Unlike other types of data networks, CAN connected devices and controllers have no bus or network address (think IP addresses within a computer network), so they just listen to any and all data traffic until something comes along that requires them to act in a particular way. Among other considerations, this makes it easier to send a data message that is intended for multiple recipient devices.

The difficult part will be figuring out the precise bits that the crash sensor gives out as it is triggered. While the CAN protocols are standardised, error messages aren't necessarily, and you'll probably have to listen in on CAN traffic while knocking on a crash sensor with a hammer to figure out what it gives out when it thinks there's been a crash.

There are Arduino CAN shields with complete libraries that let you interface with your car's CAN and listen in on all the data traffic and even send your own error messages. It's risky though, because if you don't know precisely what you are doing, you can really damage your car.
>> No. 432941 Anonymous
21st December 2019
Saturday 12:29 pm
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>>432927

The batteries are a concern. My mate has a Model S and Tesla go as far as saying that the end user shouldn't even attempt a tyre change, as jacking the car up incorrectly could pierce a battery.

People still do it, of course. I'm not sure I would. I've worked on my cars all my life and have seen jacks or axle stands slip, no matter how careful you are. I would not like the be the bloke in the news who blew his face off with a Tesla.
>> No. 432946 Anonymous
21st December 2019
Saturday 12:54 pm
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>>432941


>and have seen jacks or axle stands slip, no matter how careful you are

It depends. The factory-supplied on-board jacks are mostly pretty shit as it goes. And with cars manufactured to a tight cost point, it's not likely going to change. They should really only be used in absolute emergencies. Unfortunately, they are usually your only option when you're stranded on a roadside somewhere with a flat, worse even if you're on a soft shoulder or uneven ground.

For most of my planned repairs here at home, I use one of those small trolley jacks that Halfraud's sell for about £20. They do require a hard, level surface, like a concrete slab, but they're a very good alternative. What many people get wrong though is that they're not designed to support load permanently, so you have to use them in combination with jack stands.

They're also not practical to just keep in your boot, because they weigh a good 10 kg, which is a waste of petrol in the long run.
>> No. 432948 Anonymous
21st December 2019
Saturday 1:08 pm
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>>432946

I use floor jacks and jack stands, and because I'm a scaredy cat I've always kept the jack under the car even when it's up on stands, just in case - and twice I have had a car shift while working in it, enough that without the floor jack precaution, the car might well have dropped. If either of those cars had a giant lithium battery strapped to the underside of it, I'd have been in trouble. As you say, I can't even imagine an inexperienced person trying to lift up an EV on the side of the road with a dodgy cheap scissor jack. My missus is a lot more intelligent than I am, but I've seen what happened when she tried to change a tyre - she jacked it up on the sill and absolutely ruined the plastics.

For me these days I don't even bother with a spare wheel, that's too much weight for me too. I keep a can of Tyreweld and a track pump in the boot and I have RAC, and that's the level of puncture preparedness I've learned to live with.
>> No. 432950 Anonymous
21st December 2019
Saturday 1:43 pm
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>>432948

>she jacked it up on the sill and absolutely ruined the plastics

On most cars though, the jack points are clearly marked.


>For me these days I don't even bother with a spare wheel, that's too much weight for me too

I drive a 20-year-old Audi, and it has a 16'' Audi alloy wheel as the spare tyre at the bottom of the boot. The previous and first owner that I bought it from over ten years ago was arguably loaded (upper-level executive), he bought the car new and made-to-order in late 1999 with all the bells and whistles for almost £30K, which was a good bit of money even for an A4 back then. I've still got the original delivery receipt here with the price on it. People say they have a complete service history for their car, but what I have here is a meticulous collection of receipts for every quid that has been spent on the car since it rolled off the production line twenty years ago.

But that alloy wheel does weigh a good 40 lbs, so maybe it'd be something I could do to save fuel by replacing it with Tyreweld.


Self sage for utterly pointless rambling.
>> No. 432952 Anonymous
21st December 2019
Saturday 2:29 pm
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>>432950

>On most cars though, the jack points are clearly marked.

You tell her that m8.

>But that alloy wheel does weigh a good 40 lbs, so maybe it'd be something I could do to save fuel by replacing it with Tyreweld.

Probably. I similarly had a 19 inch alloy as a spare and it's just too much. Tyreweld is decent and works, I've used it twice now and had no issue with it. The only downside is that it's a temporary solution, I think they recommend you only go about 100 miles on a tyreweld filed tyre.
>> No. 432953 Anonymous
21st December 2019
Saturday 2:49 pm
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>>432952

> I think they recommend you only go about 100 miles on a tyreweld filed tyre.

Most spare wheels, unless you do go posho and opt for a large alloy one, are limited to 50 mph anyway, so most of the time, you're just going to go to the nearest garage to get the wheel with the flat tyre on it fixed.

I've still got a spare wheel for a Rover 45 in my basement somewhere, at it's got a big red and white sticker on it that reads "max. 50 mph". It's a bit smaller and thinner than the wheels that my 45 stood on, from what I remember.
>> No. 432968 Anonymous
21st December 2019
Saturday 9:19 pm
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>>432953

A lot of new cars don't even offer the option of a spare wheel, because a) run-flat tyres and sealant inflators are mostly good enough, b) even a low-profile spare robs you of a decent bit of boot space and c) tyres puncture infrequently enough these days that the spare is often flat and/or perished when you actually need it.
>> No. 432969 Anonymous
21st December 2019
Saturday 9:24 pm
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Airbnb bird's back in 10 minutes. She commented that my bed was cozy so I put extra blankets on hers this time.
>> No. 432972 Anonymous
21st December 2019
Saturday 9:44 pm
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>>432968

You see spare wheels on cars as early as the 1920s. In the olden days, they were usually mounted somewhere on the outside of the car, some even next to one of the front wings.

It would have made sense in those days, because there was no network of roadside assistance that you could just call on your mobile phone. If you were stranded somewhere in the countryside in 1925, with only about a car an hour passing you, a spare tyre was a real life saver that made the difference between being able to continue your journey and having to walk three miles into the nearest town.

Most off-road cars, the ones that are actually meant to go off road, not the ones the urban SUV wanker crowd drive, still have a full-sized spare wheel. If you've got a flat in the middle of the Sahara, I suppose having a spare tyre at the ready can still literally save your life.
>> No. 432983 Anonymous
22nd December 2019
Sunday 5:30 pm
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I'm losing my fucking mind, lads. Bored as fuck of both the internet and my usual walks. For the first time in my life i'm considering spending time in a pub (I'm guessing Thursday is best for social rejects and weirdos? Friday and saturday would be weekend crowds, Sunday hardcore and into-the-weekend workers?).

What do you do with your free time? I can't keep cycling the same few image boards monitoring replies. As if i'm actually going to do anything about the house or persue my long dormant hobbies. I just want forget my existance, preferably without drink or drugs - the come back is too harsh.

I've got something in mind that i can do but i seem to fill such ideas with significance as if it'll be the next step toward a better life. If I go out i might meet whoever i'm waiting for or i might find something to drag me out of this monotonous existance so i don't have to make the effort for myself.
>> No. 432984 Anonymous
22nd December 2019
Sunday 5:46 pm
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>>432983
You need a hobby. In my experience a lot of people thirty and under have no actual hobbies; they spend their time consuming media, following trends (like being really into flavoured gin because everyone else is) or going out and getting pissed.

See what local groups there are in your area. Take up art. Take up wood turning. Take up climbing. Take up a craft. Learn a language. Learn how to box. Learn an instrument.
>> No. 432985 Anonymous
22nd December 2019
Sunday 7:45 pm
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>>432983
Get a motorbike.
>> No. 432986 Anonymous
22nd December 2019
Sunday 8:18 pm
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>>432983
I think I’m going to buy some Warhammers to paint in the new year, rather than just fall into a click hole like you describe.

Sod playing the actual game though.
>> No. 432988 Anonymous
22nd December 2019
Sunday 8:29 pm
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>>432983
> For the first time in my life i'm considering spending time in a pub (I'm guessing Thursday is best for social rejects and weirdos? Friday and saturday would be weekend crowds, Sunday hardcore and into-the-weekend workers?).

Just find a old-man 'spoons (as opposed to a student spoons or a "so rough it's got security on the door" spoons) and drink happily away to your heart's content.
>> No. 432989 Anonymous
22nd December 2019
Sunday 9:22 pm
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>>432984

The important bit is novelty if you ask me. You have to keep your brain interested by putting your hobbies down in front of it like a line of treats in front of a dog, so it doesn't get fed up of them and return to scrolling.

I've been a guitarist for over 15 years, for example, so although I pick it up and bash out a few tunes on a Sunday afternoon every so often, I've reached the peak in terms of how far I could ever be arsed pushing my technical skill on the instrument. Thus, it doesn't quite occupy the level of satisfying dedication it used to.

I took up Warhammer again a year or two ago in the middle of a phase of mind numbing depression. I think I was just looking for anything to do to avoid spending time with my horrible girlfriend, but that's another story, anyway. It really helped because it was something new to sink my teeth into. I've played maybe five or six games, even though I initially said I wouldn't bother- It's the same thing again where I could actually see myself getting stuck into it, so although I'm in no rush, if I get bored I might try find a local gaming group and start making it more regular.

I still play the video games and all that lot, and I spend a lot of time staring at Youtube videos because it's the least mentally taxing way of spending the evenings after a day at work. But what I've learned is that it's no use trying to force myself to do something; I have to let my natural obsessive/compulsive tendency line up with something and do it until my interest wanes. Sometimes it's a week, sometimes it's three months. But as long as I'm not forcing it it feels alright.
>> No. 432992 Anonymous
22nd December 2019
Sunday 10:08 pm
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>>432986

The game is fun enough but GW are a joke for rules and their books are a ripoff considering they get FAQd and updated frequently. Plus they split tidbits of competitive rules through multiple books. So I pirate everything and play with old friends anyway.

I love miniatures in general, there are tons of companies around and miniature painting is a bit like the paintball to historical model makings airsoft. Maybe. Both good but with a different focus. All I know is I love it, it's relaxing and it's immensely satisfying having a display of things that look good that I made. Same goes for any art/craft really.
>> No. 432993 Anonymous
22nd December 2019
Sunday 10:13 pm
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>>432983

I go caving and climbing, and I know myself well enough that I know I won't get tired of either for a very long time. Great escapism, and all the good feelings you get with exercise.
A lot of the time you can stay in associated outdoors clubs or huts which can get you away from the endless screens, it's lovely.
>> No. 432994 Anonymous
23rd December 2019
Monday 3:09 am
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>>432992

I think they're well aware the vast majority of people just download the PDFs of their books. They have to be, because there's presumably a massive discrepancy in the sales of rules versus actual minis.

I can only conclude, therefore, that they don't mind regular people like us doing it; and they only expect to sell rulebooks at all to the turbovirgins who will not only buy each new campaign book on release day, but probably start a fresh army too just to get the benefit out of whatever specific faction has been buffed.
>> No. 433001 Anonymous
23rd December 2019
Monday 3:37 pm
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>>432994
> but probably start a fresh army too just to get the benefit out of whatever specific faction has been buffed

It came as something as a surprise to me that there were people who analysed all the rules and codexes (codices?) in order to figure out how to game the rules and build the most stupidly powerful army for the least points. I suppose that just playing Warhammer competitively as opposed to just having a laugh with your mates seemed a bit odd to me.
>> No. 433003 Anonymous
23rd December 2019
Monday 6:35 pm
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>>432994
>they only expect to sell rulebooks at all to the turbovirgins
Don't they all get a staff discount?
>> No. 433004 Anonymous
23rd December 2019
Monday 6:36 pm
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>>433001

There are younger players and people coming in from more "normal" walks of life these days, free from all the greasy basement dweller baggage tabletop gaming carried with it in the 80s and 90s. Even DnD is cool nowadays, something even I have always considered too nerdy to dabble in, but my Mrs plays it.

A lot of those new bloods seem to look at it more like an e-sport of fighting game tournament- Deeply nerdy and weird things in their own right, but which the participants seem completely oblivious to. I don't want to sound like a crusty "old school is best" elitist, but I've never met one of those hyper-competitive no fun types who started any earlier than 5th edition.
>> No. 433008 Anonymous
23rd December 2019
Monday 8:26 pm
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>>433004
> I don't want to sound like a crusty "old school is best" elitist, but I've never met one of those hyper-competitive no fun types who started any earlier than 5th edition.

I'm not saying you're wrong but the problem of "gameable" rules has been recognised since 4th ed fantasy (which was around the time of 2nd ed 40k) which was dubbed "Herohammer" because you could buy* the the Dark Elf With King for 200 points, give him the sword of Khaine for 60 and sit the bastard on a dragon for another 40 (plus he could cast spells and probably had a magic amulet with a 3+ save or whatever). Basically one kitted up special character could rampage through a thousand points of infantry and cavalry and not break a sweat. At least now people have to go to some effort to cheese the rules.

*Of course, you couldn't actually buy the model (which means you couldn't play the character at GW shops or meets) because GW were a bunch of swindling fucks who would quickly publish a new army book before they'd released models of even half army list.

Definite total sage for this one.
>> No. 433009 Anonymous
23rd December 2019
Monday 8:37 pm
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>>433008

Oh yeah, I've no doubt that the rules have always been exploitable (hero-hammer seems to be in there by design to some extent these days though, albeit in less completely broken form) and there will always be nerds who want to abuse that.

But, in a more general sense, the people I have met that have been around the hobby for a long time, are the least likely to exhibit those traits. They're more often the type who will play an army that's painstakingly lore accurate but shit in rules terms, and they'll always include some of their favourite badly painted old metal minis from 1992 rather than have everything brand new from forgeworld etc.

The general impression I get is that people who come into the hobby and treat it overly competitively, will burn out quickly and move on after a few years. After all, there's only so much depth to be had out of a dice based toy soldier game.
>> No. 433014 Anonymous
23rd December 2019
Monday 10:26 pm
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This was pretty shite.
>> No. 433016 Anonymous
24th December 2019
Tuesday 12:48 am
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>>433014

Brooker's still not back at it?

Cunt owes us a wipe by now.
>> No. 433017 Anonymous
24th December 2019
Tuesday 1:18 am
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>>433016
He's not interested in us now he's basically a shilll for Big Streaming.
>> No. 433018 Anonymous
24th December 2019
Tuesday 3:38 am
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>>433016

He's too busy wiping his knob on Konnie's face stick backed plastic, lad.
>> No. 433019 Anonymous
24th December 2019
Tuesday 9:07 am
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>>433016
This is our lot. Shitpeas, Cunk and a couple of shit new characters.
>> No. 433020 Anonymous
24th December 2019
Tuesday 9:31 am
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>>433016
He did a "Best Of" this year. Lazy bugger.
>> No. 433028 Anonymous
24th December 2019
Tuesday 3:11 pm
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>>433020
No he didn't, lad.
>> No. 433040 Anonymous
25th December 2019
Wednesday 12:03 am
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Airbnb girl doesn't want sex. Rather, she does, but is too religious to do any more than toplessly dryhump me until one of us cums. Which is fine. She's only got one day left in the country so she's just had a fairly full-on breakdown about having to leave and I'm too nice and she's just another guest to me or something after mixing beer and wine. She drank half a bottle of whiskey with me before and was fine but I guess mixing can fuck you up.
Long and short of it is that I'm now relegated from my own bedroom, drinking beer and reading old Pratchett novels in the living room. The neighbours are still doing kareoke in Spanish so that's entertaining.
>> No. 433055 Anonymous
25th December 2019
Wednesday 5:01 pm
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>>433040
>but is too religious

I just knew there was a twist like this.
>> No. 433056 Anonymous
25th December 2019
Wednesday 6:28 pm
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>>433040
>Airbnb girl doesn't want sex. Rather, she does, but is too religious to do any more than toplessly dryhump me until one of us cums.

Tell her about the ol' poophole loophole.
>> No. 433060 Anonymous
25th December 2019
Wednesday 7:57 pm
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>>433056

Getting dryhumped is a lot less hassle than mucking about with condoms or lube or cleaning a mixture of shit and cum up off your dick, it's not something to complain about.
>> No. 433061 Anonymous
25th December 2019
Wednesday 8:20 pm
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>>433060
I dunno, not if you're dryhumping until you spaff in your kecks.
>> No. 433062 Anonymous
25th December 2019
Wednesday 8:54 pm
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>>433061

Worth changing my boxers a couple more times a day if I get a five star rating out of it.
>> No. 433063 Anonymous
26th December 2019
Thursday 12:19 am
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>>433040

>Airbnb girl doesn't want sex. Rather, she does, but is too religious to do any more than toplessly dryhump me until one of us cums.

>She drank half a bottle of whiskey with me before


And that does not seem utterly fucking mildly incongruous to you?
>> No. 433066 Anonymous
26th December 2019
Thursday 8:36 am
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>>433063

Alcohol isn't a sin.
>> No. 433069 Anonymous
26th December 2019
Thursday 11:58 am
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>>433066

It is, to many radical Protestant denominations.

Or maybe she was Catholic. Then it would make sense.

I still think that lass was putting airbnblad on.
>> No. 433070 Anonymous
26th December 2019
Thursday 12:24 pm
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>>433069

There's a lot that's daft about what you just said.
>> No. 433072 Anonymous
26th December 2019
Thursday 3:26 pm
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The chicken, suasage, olive, gravy and stuffing sandwich I made myself earlier has done me in worse than the actual Christmas dinner I had yesterday did.
>> No. 433073 Anonymous
26th December 2019
Thursday 7:31 pm
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This is going to be a daft question, but would you buy his and hers electric toothbrushes for £40 (https://www.boots.com/oral-b-pro-2900-rechargable-toothbrush-duo-pack-10266562) or get one better toothbrush for the £40 and have separate heads for it?
>> No. 433074 Anonymous
26th December 2019
Thursday 7:52 pm
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>>433073
Personally I'd feel trapped in the latter scenario. As in, the stress caused could well rupture the relationship and bring it all down.
>> No. 433075 Anonymous
26th December 2019
Thursday 8:09 pm
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>>433073
Separate!
>> No. 433076 Anonymous
26th December 2019
Thursday 8:42 pm
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>>433073

Just use the same head you fanny.

Don't understand why couples avoid sharing toothbrushes. Once you've had your tongues up each others arses there's no real point in pretending you have anything to keep separate from each other.
>> No. 433077 Anonymous
26th December 2019
Thursday 9:00 pm
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>>433076
I'd honestly rather shove my tongue up her arse than put in my mouth a toothbrush she's used to clean her teeth.
>> No. 433078 Anonymous
26th December 2019
Thursday 9:13 pm
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>>433077

You do know her spit goes in your mouth when you kiss, don't you?
>> No. 433079 Anonymous
26th December 2019
Thursday 9:17 pm
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>>433078
Yeah but when I kiss her I'm not trying to remove plaque and tartar from her teeth with my tongue.
>> No. 433080 Anonymous
26th December 2019
Thursday 9:53 pm
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>>433079
Virgin.
>> No. 433081 Anonymous
26th December 2019
Thursday 10:23 pm
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>>433080
No u.
>> No. 433082 Anonymous
26th December 2019
Thursday 10:31 pm
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Okay so whatever AirBnB girl's reason for not wanting to do real sex, she gone back home, saying she's going to cherish the memories for the rest of her life and sent me a really nice email that echoes that while also not seeming like she really expects the relationship to continue beyond just staying in touch*. All in all it went quite well.


*I'd be open to continuing it if she didn't live in the heart of another continent. I'm not a total prostitute, she was someone I genuinely connected with.
>> No. 433083 Anonymous
26th December 2019
Thursday 10:32 pm
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Watching the Big Fat Quiz of 2019 on Channel 4 at the moment, which makes me feel like I've spent most of 2019 under a rock. I know almost none of the answers to the music and pop culture questions, and just barely a few politics and current events questions.

I feel even more like a shut in right now than I realistically am.
>> No. 433084 Anonymous
26th December 2019
Thursday 10:48 pm
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>>433083

I'd have expected a shut in to know more about pop culture and so on, as they watch the telly all the time.
>> No. 433085 Anonymous
26th December 2019
Thursday 10:58 pm
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>>433084
Yeah, maybe in 1993, granddad.
>> No. 433086 Anonymous
26th December 2019
Thursday 11:34 pm
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I’ve been main lining refined sugar all day and I’m excited about all the PC hardware I’ve ordered. I’m not even close to falling asleep. If it wasn’t for all the shame and anxiousness I could almost be a wee kiddy again.
>> No. 433087 Anonymous
27th December 2019
Friday 2:55 am
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>>433086

There's nowt like getting some new computer bits. I usually do that every three or four years and then go on a binge of watching tech videos and just running benchmarks for the sake of it. I have to wait for the novelty to wear off before I can even start playing games.

I've spent the last couple of days building Warhammer the missus got me and getting tipsy on port. Cozy times.
>> No. 433089 Anonymous
27th December 2019
Friday 3:08 pm
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>>433087
8 cores/16 threads. I'm buzzing. That's probably as many threads in one CPU as all my other computers and laptops combined, possibly more in fact. Sadly the graphics card isn't coming until Monday, but I'm tempted to put everything else together immediately just so I can look at it.
>> No. 433092 Anonymous
27th December 2019
Friday 4:57 pm
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All this sugar has clogged my pours with an oily sludge - so many black heads it's awful. Plenty of water and hot steam baths for the next few weeks i suppose.
>> No. 433093 Anonymous
27th December 2019
Friday 5:08 pm
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>>433092

>pours

Tut tut.
>> No. 433096 Anonymous
27th December 2019
Friday 6:43 pm
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Is anyone else's mum obsessed with home renovations? I've been to visit my parents recently and she was on about having the kitchen re-done when it can only have been about 6/7 years since it was last done. In the past 15 years or so she's had the paving outside done twice, a conservatory built, the conservatory taken down and replaced with an extension, their bedroom completely re-done with fitted wardrobes, the bathroom completely re-done, walls knocked down to make downstairs more open plan, new tiling in the porch, a new driveway/front garden and the upstairs loo completely re-done. This is without mentioning countless changes of furniture, doors and repainting. It's like she gets itchy feet and always has to have a project on the go.
>> No. 433113 Anonymous
28th December 2019
Saturday 7:58 pm
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>>433096

My parents are the other way round and really can't be arsed to do much renovating around the house. I told them they should consider the impact on their resale value, but they keep saying they don't see where their house needs much renovating.

In the coming spring though, they are going to have to have the garage roof fixed, because there's been water dripping through the garage's roof around where the rain water down pipe comes through, and it's not something that should be taken lightly. It's a poured concrete roof, so it's not going to rot away just because it's been dripping through for two or three years, but it does need all new waterproofing, if they don't want to take chances on the roof collapsing some time in the next ten years.
>> No. 433114 Anonymous
28th December 2019
Saturday 8:12 pm
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>>433113
When I visit my parents at christmas I have to make sure I go armed with a screwdriver at the very least because there's always something like a loose handle on a tap or something that needs tightening or a door-hinge that needs oiling etc.

>if they don't want to take chances on the roof collapsing some time in the next ten years.
I would start to worry if you can spot any rust-staining anywhere.
>> No. 433115 Anonymous
28th December 2019
Saturday 8:32 pm
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>>433096
Sounds like your Dad's fault for letting it happen.
>> No. 433116 Anonymous
28th December 2019
Saturday 8:34 pm
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>>433113
Owning a home sounds awful.
>> No. 433117 Anonymous
28th December 2019
Saturday 9:08 pm
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>>433116

So does living in a rented council flat all your life.
>> No. 433118 Anonymous
28th December 2019
Saturday 9:09 pm
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>>433116
Because taking your landlord to court to force them to fix the problems in your rental is much more fun.

Hey remember that guy who tweeted that their landlord had installed a locked cage over the thermostat? Lucky bastard!
>> No. 433119 Anonymous
28th December 2019
Saturday 9:20 pm
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>>433118

Who doesn't want a bit of excitement in their life.


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ikKnT92ao28
>> No. 433120 Anonymous
28th December 2019
Saturday 9:37 pm
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>>433119
>> No. 433122 Anonymous
28th December 2019
Saturday 9:41 pm
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>>433120

That's odd. Maybe check your Internet connection?
>> No. 433123 Anonymous
28th December 2019
Saturday 9:55 pm
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>>433120
>> No. 433124 Anonymous
28th December 2019
Saturday 9:58 pm
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>>433123
>> No. 433136 Anonymous
28th December 2019
Saturday 10:47 pm
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>>433124
>> No. 433138 Anonymous
28th December 2019
Saturday 10:55 pm
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>>433136
>> No. 433139 Anonymous
28th December 2019
Saturday 10:59 pm
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>>433136

(A good day to you Sir!)
>> No. 433145 Anonymous
29th December 2019
Sunday 1:08 pm
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>>433136
That's not enough, we have to go deeper.
>> No. 433146 Anonymous
29th December 2019
Sunday 1:26 pm
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>> No. 433154 Anonymous
30th December 2019
Monday 11:46 am
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I'm not saying my girlfriend's family are a bit council, but her sister has complained that she went into Dunelm and it was full of poshos. I guess it might be if all you're used to is Primark and B&M Bargains, but still.
>> No. 433155 Anonymous
30th December 2019
Monday 12:07 pm
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The builder across the road said I can have all his old wooden pallets, he's going to drop about 20 off. It'll take a while to dry out but that's a hell of a lot of free wood. I'm going to build so much rickety bullshit with these I'm super excited.
>> No. 433156 Anonymous
30th December 2019
Monday 12:10 pm
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Incidentally can anyone give me tips on how to dry them out so the wood doesn't warp and bend too much?
>> No. 433164 Anonymous
30th December 2019
Monday 2:46 pm
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>>433156
It's pallet wood - it is going to do that. You should certainly try taking the pallets to bits as soon as possible and stacking them carefully in the dry - but they are going to warp a bit.
>> No. 433165 Anonymous
30th December 2019
Monday 2:48 pm
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>>433164
Looking at them they're mainly dry anyway. They'll need a wash but do I still need to take them apart right away? How do I get the nails out? I have a claw hammer but any other tools will have to wait a few days to be bought.
>> No. 433166 Anonymous
30th December 2019
Monday 2:51 pm
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>>433165
20 of them will be quite a big pile if you don't. Claw hammer should be enough I would think - do it slowly so as not to accidentally destroy the wood.
>> No. 433167 Anonymous
30th December 2019
Monday 3:03 pm
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>>433166
He was being hyperbolic, there's only a dozen. You're right though, I'll need to take them apart to get back into me shed. Cheers, I'll make a start tomorrow.
>> No. 433168 Anonymous
30th December 2019
Monday 5:01 pm
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>>433166
Claw hammer will be torture for that many pallets. You can get nice big levers, like
https://www.amazon.co.uk/Roughneck-ROU64640-Demolition-Lifting-Bar/dp/B003CT4D1S
I use them for all sorts of stuff, but I think they were designed as pallet fuckers.
>> No. 433169 Anonymous
30th December 2019
Monday 5:21 pm
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>>433168
Could I not just get a crowbar so it's not limited to doing this one really specific task?
How do you use these anyway, jam them into a gap in the wood or what?
>> No. 433173 Anonymous
30th December 2019
Monday 6:07 pm
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>>433169
It sounds like you just want an excuse to buy a crowbar, so in that vein, YES OF COURSE IT WILL WORK.
>> No. 433174 Anonymous
30th December 2019
Monday 6:13 pm
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>>433173
Crowbars are less than half the price of that thing that only does one, really specific job.
>> No. 433175 Anonymous
30th December 2019
Monday 6:19 pm
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>>433169
I use a small 1 foot 6 inch crowbar and do just finn. Often the nails will come out with each board, which you can hammer out, otherwise just use the split end of the crowbar to pull them.

You'll figure out how to use it in little time. Put aside a pallet or two to practice on - it's amazing just how fast a metal bar and leverage will chew through wood. Fun, too. Crowbor really would be invaluable in a zombie apocalypse.

From my experience, pallet wood tends to be brittle and poor quality but it can be tidied up with a bit of plaining. It splits into kindling well, but don't burn treated wood (blue or red stained) for the smoke stinks, and is probably unhealthy.

That lever mentioned above looks like it'd save a fair bit of wood from splitting. Might be worth it if you're deconstructing pallets on an industrial scale, but for the shed probably not.

Good luck processing 12, i ususally call it a day after 3.
>> No. 433176 Anonymous
30th December 2019
Monday 6:24 pm
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>>433175
Uh, to save possible confusion imaged isn't a crowbar. It's a 'froe' used to split or 'cleave' wood.
>> No. 433177 Anonymous
30th December 2019
Monday 6:26 pm
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>>433169

We were putting laminate down in the spare room earlier this year, and I bought a crowbar just to pull up the carpet grips. I do not regret the decision in the slightest.
>> No. 433178 Anonymous
30th December 2019
Monday 6:33 pm
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>>433175
>Crowbor really would be invaluable in a zombie apocalypse.
I found this monstrosity on the B&Q website, looks like the Combine equivalent of Gordon's usual tool.

I see there are things called "utility bars" which look like they may be a nice combination between crowbars and the forklift looking thing; flat and wide enough to not cause too much damage on the levering.
>> No. 433190 Anonymous
30th December 2019
Monday 9:05 pm
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>>433177
I bought a small crowbar, brand new, for £1 at a carboot sale in Sussex about 13 years ago. It's once of the best purchases I've ever made. I wish I'd bought 10 of them.
>> No. 433191 Anonymous
30th December 2019
Monday 9:10 pm
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It was on the radio today that you can pick up an upright piano for peanuts on eBay because nobody wants them anymore. I've had a look and there's quite a few going for free or ~£20. I'm considering getting one for my girlfriend as a present so I've got a couple of questions:-

1. Are there any places other than eBay I should be having a look for them?

2. How much does a man with a van generally cost?
>> No. 433193 Anonymous
30th December 2019
Monday 9:21 pm
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>>433191

For 20 quid, you can expect that piano to be completely out of tune and needing plenty of work, from dead keys to worn out strings and wonky pedals, before you can play any kind of music on it that will be pleasant to listen to. Refurbishing a piano and tuning it is an art, and piano tuners ask hefty sums.

There's a reason why these pianos go for that little money, because their previous owners in all likelihood were told how much they'd have to invest in repairs to get them back into good working order again. So they'll practically be a writeoff, financially speaking, and should really only be seen as fixer uppers for people who know what they're doing. This isn't a weekend job for a layman who's good with a toolbox.
>> No. 433194 Anonymous
30th December 2019
Monday 9:24 pm
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>>433192
A lot of them say they're in full working order, although some of them are clearly aged. They've simply fallen out of fashion and people are struggling to even give them away.

For example, the baby grand piano in my previous post is currently at £16. The description makes me a little bit sad.

>Weber baby grand piano around 100 years old, refurbished in the early 1970s. Condition is Seller refurbished. Collection in person only. Converted from a Pianola to an ordinary piano when refurbished and hardly used after I left home in 1976. Recent stroke means I'll never play again. Measurements are 1820mm long x 1470mm wide x 1025mm high. Sun bleached on the left hand side that was adjacent to the window. All in working order.

https://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/Weber-baby-grand-piano-100-years-old-refurbished-in-the-early-1970s/223811716886
>> No. 433195 Anonymous
30th December 2019
Monday 9:41 pm
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>>433191
Better off getting a digital piano with weighted keys instead. I got my Casio CDP-130 for around £110, and in the process realised that the facebook marketplace is a great place to find good deals.

As a bonus, you can hook up the digital piano to your computer and use it as a MIDI controller to make wicked sick electronic choonz.
>> No. 433196 Anonymous
30th December 2019
Monday 10:08 pm
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>>433194

"Working order" is potentially a very broad term - I wouldn't touch an instrument unless it had been fully inspected by a piano technician. The early 1970s are nearly 50 years ago and there's a lot that can go wrong with an instrument in that time. If the tuning pins are loose or the strings are badly corroded, the piano will be impossible to properly tune; new pins will cost you at least £1,000 and a full restring could cost as much as £3,000. Even something as minor as some tired hammers or worn bushings could cost several hundred quid. It's easy to get stuck with a very heavy white elephant if you don't know what you're doing.

A man with a van might be able to shift an upright that you don't mind dropping, but a baby grand will need professional moving at a cost of at least £100 plus mileage. Even if it's in perfect nick, a piano will need at least two tunings a year at a cost of about £70 a time.

My guitar technician buys old pianos to chop up for bracewood, which is about all most of them are good for. If you're determined to get your girlfriend a piano, I'd speak to a professional dealer.
>> No. 433206 Anonymous
31st December 2019
Tuesday 11:22 am
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>>433195

I've been looking at the Yamaha DX-7 as a classic synth to own. Loads of 80s and early 90s chart music was made on it, it was an affordable yet potent synth that enabled unsigned basement bands to sound big. They sell for about £400 in decent condition nowadays, I seem to remember them being just over half that a few years ago, so now might be the time to pick one up before they start commanding ludicrous sums. But they aren't problem free. Where you have worn out hammers, pins, and strings on a piano, you can have bad soldering spots or burned out microchips on a synth's circuit boards, and they will leave you none the wiser unless you have good working knowledge of that sort of thing.

What I'd really like to have is a Memorymoog, but they now go for up to £8,000, which is a lot of money just to tinker with a piece of old hardware if you have no serious plans to make actual music with it.
>> No. 433213 Anonymous
31st December 2019
Tuesday 2:22 pm
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>>433206

The Reface DX isn't as complete as the DX7, but it does all of the essential FM stuff, it's a hell of a lot easier to program and you can get a tidy one with plenty of change from £200.



I've always wanted a CS-80, but they cost as much as a small house and the VCOs are a bastard to tune. I've been tempted by the Deckard's Dream which is only $3000, but there are rumours that Yamaha are planning a reissue of the CS-80 this year.
>> No. 433215 Anonymous
31st December 2019
Tuesday 2:40 pm
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>>433213

Realistically, you can just dump whole DX7 libraries into the music editing suite of your choice and save yourself the trouble of scanning the market for the real thing in good nick. But that's not what it's about to me. I'd love to own a piece of vintage synth technology that isn't going to rob the bank. If you look at Fairlight CMIs, if you can still find them, the asking price can be up to about £18K now for the whole lot, i.e. keyboard, monitor, and mainframe, in serviced condition. Usually they will have been owned by famous studio producers or other big acts, because when they were new they were almost as expensive as a four-bedroom family home. I remember seeing Trevor Horn's actual CMI on eBay a few years ago, and then the one used by Dieter Meyer of Yello for all their classic 80s tracks, but again, going on £20K is not money that's realistic for you to spend if you're just an average lad with a passing interest in old synths.
>> No. 433239 Anonymous
31st December 2019
Tuesday 7:08 pm
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Got a Behringer Crave ordered and on the way.
>> No. 433343 Anonymous
2nd January 2020
Thursday 11:35 pm
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E4 are doing another Inbetweeners back to back run tonight.

It never gets annoying no matter how many times you've watched it.
>> No. 433344 Anonymous
3rd January 2020
Friday 12:12 am
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It's funny. Next month I'm going to change my legal name, but I don't want to change my @hotmail.co.uk email.
>> No. 433345 Anonymous
3rd January 2020
Friday 2:32 am
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>>433344

>but I don't want to change my @hotmail.co.uk email

Seeing as you're changing your name, go and buy "YourName.co.uk".
>> No. 433347 Anonymous
3rd January 2020
Friday 6:19 am
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>>433343
Agreed - even the old ones still have me properly laughing.
>> No. 433354 Anonymous
3rd January 2020
Friday 1:24 pm
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>>433344
Can we have a vote on your new moniker?
>> No. 433358 Anonymous
3rd January 2020
Friday 2:31 pm
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>>433343
As funny as I find it I just can't get over how stingingly accurate it was.

They absolutely nailed it repeatedly over so many series, the plot lines, the characters, everything.

True piece of art.
>> No. 433359 Anonymous
3rd January 2020
Friday 2:32 pm
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>>433354

Britty McFagface, obvs.
>> No. 433360 Anonymous
3rd January 2020
Friday 2:34 pm
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>>433358

Does anyone remember the massive thread we had over the US remake? I think I was the only sadact who actually torrented and watched the entire show. At least it wasn't as awful as American "Skins".
>> No. 433365 Anonymous
3rd January 2020
Friday 3:01 pm
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>>433360
Skins was doomed from the start. The UK version already rode a fine line between believability and complete hyper-farce. I've never had to kill any therapists and I've never met anyone who was almost forced to rape their unconsious, ODing sister for the amusement of a load of poshos. Perhaps I'm more sheltered than most though.
>> No. 433366 Anonymous
3rd January 2020
Friday 3:07 pm
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>>433365

I suppose a show about a bunch of normal teenagers hanging around a park with cheap vodka and shit hash probably wouldn't have made for great television.

I think the inbetweeners got away with things because they exaggerated everything but only just enough for it to be funny. Skins turned the exaggeration all the way up to eleven and then set fire to it.
>> No. 433367 Anonymous
3rd January 2020
Friday 3:18 pm
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>>433358
It's brilliantly accurate about what its like to be a boy at that age. It is very well observed and written, which I guess is why it is so easy to go back to repeats and still laugh - a lot.
>> No. 433370 Anonymous
3rd January 2020
Friday 3:52 pm
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>>433367

> It is very well observed and written

That's because it was written from the actual perspective of a bunch of younglads, and didn't come from a place of adult worry over the things their offspring do, or young-adult story writers projecting their guilt over the things they got away with growing up. There is no moralism, no exaggeration that merely pulls the audience's fear strings (like a lot of teen TV series do, especially the American kind), and it also isn't an exercise in bleakness like Skins and similar formats. And the adults in the Inbetweeners are portrayed in an endearing way as well, where they aren't the stuffy old generation pointing fingers, but are revealed to still be the same old bell ends deep down that they were 25 years ago when they were teenagers themselves. Which yet again sets it apart from other teen TV series.
>> No. 433427 Anonymous
4th January 2020
Saturday 3:53 pm
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Managed to disassemble two of my wooden pallets. Only lost some parts of the first one which was shitty composite wood and hadn't been kept dry at all. 15" Steel Utility bar seems to do the job nicely so far. Only twelve to go.

I know it's not midweek but I can't be bothered to make a new thread and don't want to use the festive weekend one.
>> No. 433433 Anonymous
4th January 2020
Saturday 7:54 pm
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>>433427
Any ideas what to do with the bent, rusted nails? I've a huge stack of them just sitting in the shed.
>> No. 433434 Anonymous
4th January 2020
Saturday 8:02 pm
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>>433433
You could probably still use them to make pallets out of your all your wood.
>> No. 433435 Anonymous
4th January 2020
Saturday 8:19 pm
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>>433433
Not really, no. See if a scrap metal merchant wants them?
>> No. 433436 Anonymous
4th January 2020
Saturday 8:37 pm
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>>433433
What do they taste of?
>> No. 433437 Anonymous
4th January 2020
Saturday 8:48 pm
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>>433436
Twiglets.
>> No. 433438 Anonymous
4th January 2020
Saturday 10:26 pm
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>>433433

ebay, someone will buy them
>> No. 433439 Anonymous
4th January 2020
Saturday 10:34 pm
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>>433433 >>433438
I'll buy them for 3/4 of the cost to ship them.
>> No. 433463 Anonymous
6th January 2020
Monday 5:22 pm
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Thanks to going a little bit nuts in the reduced section of Co-op I have a 1kg tin of peanut butter, four packets of pasta, a couple of packets of tofu and a dozen large eggs. What do I concoct with these?
>> No. 433464 Anonymous
6th January 2020
Monday 6:09 pm
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One of my neighbours downstairs took an Amazon package for me last Thursday. I've been trying to catch him, but he apparently hasn't been home since. I don't know his phone number, and he isn't in any phone directory. His next door neighbour downstairs also told me he doesn't know anything about him and hardly ever sees him. I put a note on my neighbour's door Saturday to come up to me as soon as he'd get back from wherever it was that he went, but that note, too, is still on his door, untouched.

Who the fuck accepts a package in the knowledge that they will be gone for the next five days.
>> No. 433465 Anonymous
6th January 2020
Monday 6:18 pm
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>>433464
Who the fuck has an Amazon package that won't fit through their letter box delivered to their house if they know they won't be home to receive it?
>> No. 433466 Anonymous
6th January 2020
Monday 6:22 pm
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>>433465

I was home that day for the most part, but then I had to go out for some errands, for less than an hour, and that's when the package was delivered apparently.
>> No. 433467 Anonymous
6th January 2020
Monday 6:23 pm
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Disassembled the first proper wooden pallet today, not just small or cheap composite wood ones. It's significantly more difficult. Only managed to finish one before stopping for the day, got my first injury doing it too.
Nice pieces of wood though. Enough to build a medium sized planter from and have leftovers.
>> No. 433468 Anonymous
6th January 2020
Monday 7:01 pm
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>>433465
People who work for a living?
>> No. 433470 Anonymous
6th January 2020
Monday 7:09 pm
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>>433468
Nice try mate, but the reality is that you just don't know how to use a shopping website.
>> No. 433472 Anonymous
6th January 2020
Monday 7:12 pm
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>>433468
Also decent workplaces will accept Amazon parcels on your behalf.
>> No. 433473 Anonymous
6th January 2020
Monday 7:37 pm
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>>433464

he has your drugs doesn't he? only someone who was waiting for a drugs package would be so nervous.
>> No. 433474 Anonymous
6th January 2020
Monday 7:37 pm
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>>433472
I've worked at a few shitty places and even they'd let you receive deliveries there.
>> No. 433476 Anonymous
6th January 2020
Monday 7:45 pm
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>>433470
>>433472
>>433474

Again, I don't think I'm the cunt for leaving my flat for an errand at 4pm on the day when I was at home the whole time to receive that package. Generally speaking, my observation is that if Amazon or similar shipments aren't here by 4pm, they will come the next day, even if the tracking information tells you you'll still get it that day.

Still no sign of my neighbour.


>>433473
>he has your drugs doesn't he?

Amazon sells drugs now?
>> No. 433477 Anonymous
6th January 2020
Monday 7:53 pm
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>>433476
It's not like drug dealers can be trusted to respect trademark law.
>> No. 433478 Anonymous
6th January 2020
Monday 8:10 pm
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If I can I get Amazon packages delivered to the Post Office now, because there is absolutely no telling what time they'll arrive. I think the Post Office bods think I'm weird/annoying for doing so, but whatever.
>> No. 433479 Anonymous
6th January 2020
Monday 8:22 pm
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>>433478
Just use one of the drop off lockers. Then you can pick your parcel up from in the evening.
>> No. 433480 Anonymous
6th January 2020
Monday 10:32 pm
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>>433479
I had a joke Christmas present dropped off to my local supermarket about 3 years ago only for the place to close down before I could collect it. I would've called up to complain but it was only £8 so I never got around to bothering. Early last year I got an email "your refund is being processed". Got my money back.
>> No. 433481 Anonymous
6th January 2020
Monday 11:14 pm
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Ever since I got an electric toothbrush there seems to be a lot more flecks of spittle on my clothes.
>> No. 433485 Anonymous
7th January 2020
Tuesday 5:53 pm
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I've just spent over an hour making a chicken vegetable stew from scratch with all fresh ingredients, but the taste now is slightly underwhelming. I'm not sure why this is, I know my way around a stew normally. Could be too much garlic and too little salt, I don't know.
>> No. 433486 Anonymous
7th January 2020
Tuesday 6:05 pm
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>>433485 It'll be better tomorrow, let it rest.
>> No. 433489 Anonymous
7th January 2020
Tuesday 6:24 pm
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>>433485
Salt would've been my guess. It's the secret to tastiness.
>> No. 433496 Anonymous
8th January 2020
Wednesday 12:11 am
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I will be in Newcastle for a few days next week. 

Any noteworthy places to go have a pint after work up there?
>> No. 433507 Anonymous
8th January 2020
Wednesday 1:12 pm
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>>433496

The Crown Posada if you like stained glass and real ale, anywhere on Bigg Market if you like hen night slags.
>> No. 433508 Anonymous
8th January 2020
Wednesday 2:20 pm
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>>433507

>if you like hen night slags.

Those tend to be the best slags.
>> No. 433509 Anonymous
8th January 2020
Wednesday 4:10 pm
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Downstairslad just kindly rang on my door and gave me my Amazon parcel.

I brought up the fact with him that it's probably not the best idea to accept mail for a neighbour if you know you are going to be gone for six days, and he just said, "Oh yeah, sorry about that". He offered no reasons or good explanations. I was fuming, but didn't get to really express my anger, because he said he had to get going as his shift would start in a bit.

I just hope he doesn't work anywhere in customer service.
>> No. 433510 Anonymous
8th January 2020
Wednesday 4:10 pm
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>>433507

You can't just be telling a (presumably) southerner to be going out on the Bigg Market. I think they'd do you for manslaughter.
>> No. 433520 Anonymous
8th January 2020
Wednesday 5:01 pm
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>>433509

Honestly you sound like the kind of cunt who'd complain just as loudly if no one took in his parcel.
>> No. 433534 Anonymous
8th January 2020
Wednesday 5:58 pm
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>>433509
He apologised and doesn't owe you an explanation.

Consider yourself lucky he didn't sell it on eBay, flat dweller.
>> No. 433548 Anonymous
8th January 2020
Wednesday 8:27 pm
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>>433534

Right.
>> No. 433567 Anonymous
8th January 2020
Wednesday 10:12 pm
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I'm really enjoying the recent improvements to the site. And of course I'm doing it while enjoying a delicious, quick, easy meal with all the nutrients I require.
>> No. 433570 Anonymous
8th January 2020
Wednesday 10:18 pm
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>>433567
If you want to take a picture of your screen there is a 'print screen' button; it doesn't actually print out what's on your screen!
>> No. 433571 Anonymous
8th January 2020
Wednesday 10:21 pm
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>>433567
Goodness me - I think we have the same monitor.
>> No. 433574 Anonymous
8th January 2020
Wednesday 11:06 pm
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>>433567
I don't understand why people still cook I really don't.
>> No. 433575 Anonymous
8th January 2020
Wednesday 11:09 pm
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>>433571

The 34" curvy ultrawide? It's lovely. Really good for multitasking like browsing here while also looking for delicious Huel recipe ideas at the same time
>> No. 433579 Anonymous
8th January 2020
Wednesday 11:25 pm
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>>433574
Does this photograph foreshadow the next gs ad campaign by any chance?
>> No. 433580 Anonymous
8th January 2020
Wednesday 11:28 pm
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>>433574
This picture has everything. I like a person who has all the condiments like Sarsons vinegar, McD BBQ sauce and some of that pizza dipping thing, next to their monitor just in case.

I'm worried we're going to lose the Huel deal though, with eating like that; do you have any tofu?
>> No. 433585 Anonymous
9th January 2020
Thursday 8:54 am
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>>433580
>some of that pizza dipping thing

That's for the wedges. You fuckers don't dunm your pizza in the garlic dip?
>> No. 433587 Anonymous
9th January 2020
Thursday 9:08 am
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>>433585

That garlic and herb dip is the only thing separating a Domino's pizza from total inedibility.
>> No. 433588 Anonymous
9th January 2020
Thursday 9:24 am
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>>433587

I find Domino's pizza generally disappointing.

There is a family-owned Italian pizzeria a few minutes from where I live, where I usually get my take away pizza. Granted, their choice of toppings is more limited, but you get really good authentic Italian pizza there at a decent price. And if you go there in person, they will serve you a free shot of grappa while you wait for your order.
>> No. 433590 Anonymous
9th January 2020
Thursday 9:53 am
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>>433587
Are you having it with the sundried tomato and garlic sauce or just their standard pizza sauce?
>> No. 433594 Anonymous
9th January 2020
Thursday 12:50 pm
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One day I'll prep chillis and not immediately rub my eyes and/or penis afterwards. One day...

Also I've got my first Labour Party meeting tonight. Thinking about going in hard on the pro-Iraq War, yet strongly anti-Israel angle of attack before declaring a breakaway party when someone asks what my fucking problem is.
>> No. 433597 Anonymous
9th January 2020
Thursday 1:20 pm
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Since yesterday I've inoculated four grow hardwood chip substrate bags with mushroom spore, sown seeds for ten Sichuan pepper plants and ten of Bhut Jolokia, Carolina Reaper and Morgua Scorpion each, plus another two garlic, bringing that up to six total. I planted this one on Friday, I think; it's already six inches and getting too big for its pot. I may have to transfer these to a "planter" outdoors sooner rather than later.
Germination chambers all ready for my sixty succulent seeds that should arrive later today then I've got ~two thousand mixed poppy seeds to build planters for by March.

Problem: Where I dug the lawn over, grass is just growing back. Do I have to dig it again or can I just go over it with a blowtorch to kill the seedlings before sowing other things on it?
>> No. 433598 Anonymous
9th January 2020
Thursday 1:28 pm
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>>433597
I would just dig the lawn over again - blowtorch sounds a bit excessive, much as I like fire.
>> No. 433599 Anonymous
9th January 2020
Thursday 2:02 pm
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>>433597
Outside over the winter? I know there are such things as winter crops but i didn't think they were garlic and peppers.
>> No. 433600 Anonymous
9th January 2020
Thursday 2:19 pm
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>>433598

I'll see if the neighbour has anything that makes fire, otherwise I'll go with your suggestion.

>>433599
The garlic, not the peppers. It would hopefully do okay.
>> No. 433602 Anonymous
9th January 2020
Thursday 4:44 pm
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>>433594
>my first Labour Party meeting tonight

Are you an entryist for OUR JESS?
>> No. 433603 Anonymous
9th January 2020
Thursday 5:56 pm
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>>433602
I don't know yet, I think I'll spend more than fifteen seconds deciding.
>> No. 433604 Anonymous
9th January 2020
Thursday 7:47 pm
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Missed the meeting. 2dumb4lyf.
>> No. 433605 Anonymous
9th January 2020
Thursday 8:05 pm
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>>433603
#deep
>> No. 433606 Anonymous
9th January 2020
Thursday 8:05 pm
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>>433602

I normally have a right stonk on for redheads, but in this case, erm, no.
>> No. 433607 Anonymous
9th January 2020
Thursday 8:19 pm
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>>433606
ladm8
>> No. 433608 Anonymous
9th January 2020
Thursday 8:27 pm
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>>433607
She looks like my friend's big sister, who used to pin her down and fart in her face.
>> No. 433609 Anonymous
9th January 2020
Thursday 8:36 pm
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>>433605
I don't see why you're being sarcastic about as social media (I know, I know) has been full of people declaring that if their perfect, ideal, wonderful choice doesn't win and one of the scoundrels who are also in the running does, they'll just dip out of the party forever.

Sage for /pol/ overflow.
>> No. 433614 Anonymous
9th January 2020
Thursday 11:27 pm
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>>433607

She looks like one of the PE teachers at my school who was also in charge of the girls volleyball team. Her best friend and flatmate was somewhat obviously her lesbian lover, but not that that was talked about openly.

It was the 90s, you know. Ebullient hedonism on the one hand, teachers keeping quiet about their homosexuality on the other hand.
>> No. 433617 Anonymous
10th January 2020
Friday 12:16 am
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It's finally happening. A place of employment, if just for an internship, where you have to pay them to work there, and from the word go, they're asking an optimistic $15. And it's full time, so it's going to cost you a cool $120 a day, or $2,400 a month.

https://twitter.com/tjmcnab/status/1214653879960383492


They're really taking the piss though by expecting applicants with "strong critical thinking skills".

Dirty fuckers.
>> No. 433620 Anonymous
10th January 2020
Friday 1:17 am
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>>433617
>They're really taking the piss though by expecting applicants with "strong critical thinking skills".
You're just mad you failed the test by reposting a fake job ad.
>> No. 433624 Anonymous
10th January 2020
Friday 1:47 am
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>>433620
This is sadly what happens when you get all of your britfa contribution material from lurking reddit.
>> No. 433626 Anonymous
10th January 2020
Friday 9:35 am
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This collection of linux desktop screenshots circa 2001 has given me a tremendous Proustian rush.

https://prettylinux.acrobat.com/
>> No. 433627 Anonymous
10th January 2020
Friday 11:14 am
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>>433624
Yeah. I prefer it when we don't have any new threads instead.
>> No. 433632 Anonymous
10th January 2020
Friday 1:19 pm
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>>433626

Winamp 3 with a customised skin and a Britney Spears glamour shot.

Classic.

Back then, I was running a pirated copy of Windows XP with a StyleXP skin that mimicked Mac OS. It looked pretty convincing.
>> No. 433633 Anonymous
10th January 2020
Friday 1:32 pm
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>>433632
It really whips the llama's ass.
>> No. 433634 Anonymous
10th January 2020
Friday 1:34 pm
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>>433626
>Proustian
Thank you, lovely word I didn't know.


I don't know if it's because this sort of nostalgic screenshot covered me being a kid through to my teens, but I really really enjoy them, even if they're games and desktops I wouldn't have had.

It just seems like a simpler time when the internet was more decentralised and a lot simpler.
>> No. 433635 Anonymous
10th January 2020
Friday 1:37 pm
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Was mistaken for another lad at work for the third time today. The primary characteristic we share is that we're both notably fat. I haven't historically been that bothered about being overweight, but something about these interactions have left me feeling like I want to change. Maybe it's confronting the fact that I am obviously just defined in people's perceptions as "the fat guy" and I don't like that. So I'll change it if I'm capable.

Wish me luck lads.
>> No. 433636 Anonymous
10th January 2020
Friday 1:47 pm
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>>433635

Good luck fatty!
>> No. 433640 Anonymous
10th January 2020
Friday 3:07 pm
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>>433626
>Proustian rush

There is a certain part in the game Eternal Darkness that causes a very specific memory and emotion to occour within me; something about the boss at my place of work during troubled teen years - it's difficult to remember without the stimulus i'd apparently attached it to. The only reason i remember this now is because of a sudden insight as it happened most recently, about 2 years ago. It's a truely scary phenomena, especially when you consider its likelines to have been actively applied over human history.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Involuntary_memory
>> No. 433645 Anonymous
10th January 2020
Friday 3:20 pm
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>>433640
>It's a truely scary phenomena, especially when you consider its likelines to have been actively applied over human history.
What?
>> No. 433647 Anonymous
10th January 2020
Friday 3:25 pm
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>>433635
There's a fat kid at work called Matt M. Everyone calls him his surname but beginning with F because of the alliteration of Fatt F.
>> No. 433651 Anonymous
10th January 2020
Friday 3:43 pm
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>>433635

I've been quite skinny all my life. So I was always known as the skinny lad in school, and then at uni and at work. Sort of bothered me at times, but I accepted it.
>> No. 433653 Anonymous
10th January 2020
Friday 4:00 pm
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>>433645
Well, what practical use can you imagine for memory recall that might be considered 'scary'? Remember that memory isn't just recalling information like an image or password; it can also recall a states of mind, perceptions and beliefs.

The experience mentioned above, for example, has me vividly recall a memory surrounded by self harm and the conditions i responded to with that. I don't simply remember it reletive to now, rather i become the memory - relive it, even.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Involuntary_memory#Psychosis

Perhaps i'm misinterpreting the subject.
>> No. 433654 Anonymous
10th January 2020
Friday 4:02 pm
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>>433653
>what practical use can you imagine for memory recall that might be considered 'scary'?
Remembering how you got away from that predator or danger the first time I suppose.
>> No. 433656 Anonymous
10th January 2020
Friday 4:28 pm
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They're fucking calling it Megxit now.


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pGRk4VJLfYQ
>> No. 433657 Anonymous
10th January 2020
Friday 4:54 pm
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>>433627
I suppose the deal with Huel requires at least some form of content to be posted.
>> No. 433675 Anonymous
10th January 2020
Friday 7:16 pm
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>>433651

I'm almost certainly known as 'bald, beard, quite short' at work, but I'm fine with that over fat, or smelly, or dickhead, I suppose.
>> No. 433712 Anonymous
11th January 2020
Saturday 2:54 pm
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>>433675

> but I'm fine with that over fat, or smelly, or dickhead, I suppose.


Depends on who's calling you that. At one of my old jobs, there was a middle aged woman that I secretly referred to with my coworkers as the cookie monster, because she always seemed to be munching on biscuits or other sweets, and she was well fat. Didn't stop her from always calling me "skinny bones". As I said before, I have always been quite skinny and that is probably the easiest way for people to identify me. And that's fine, I'm at peace with it. But being called skinny bones by a 20-stone, double chinned blob of a woman was a bit much.
>> No. 433768 Anonymous
14th January 2020
Tuesday 5:30 pm
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Went to B&Q tonight. They've got a smoking hot lass working there now, although you realise after about 20 seconds of talking to her that she's absolutely thick as pig shit.

I still left there with various images in my head of us doing massively dirty things together.
>> No. 433769 Anonymous
14th January 2020
Tuesday 5:45 pm
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>>433768
Post them please.
>> No. 433770 Anonymous
14th January 2020
Tuesday 5:55 pm
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>>433768
I've had this in my head all day for some reason.
>> No. 433771 Anonymous
14th January 2020
Tuesday 8:09 pm
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>>433769

You're asking an anonymous stranger to describe his wank fantasies about some bird from B&Q. Sort your life out mate.
>> No. 433772 Anonymous
14th January 2020
Tuesday 8:10 pm
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>>433771

Don't be such a prude.
>> No. 433773 Anonymous
14th January 2020
Tuesday 8:14 pm
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>>433772

He could at least have his own wank fantasies about reasonably attractive retail employees, or ask for wank fantasies about unattainable celebrities.
>> No. 433775 Anonymous
15th January 2020
Wednesday 5:17 pm
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Whenever I buy a 2.5kg bag of chips the checkout operators always pass comment. I don't even have chips that often, I just like paying the lowest price per kg for them.
>> No. 433776 Anonymous
16th January 2020
Thursday 1:17 pm
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>>433775
You should write an entire stand-up routine around that very premise.
>> No. 433782 Anonymous
16th January 2020
Thursday 5:29 pm
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>>433776


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=M_bbU_BUIC0
>> No. 433783 Anonymous
16th January 2020
Thursday 5:42 pm
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>>433776

SOMEONE LIKES YOGHURT.

I just want to be on telly.
>> No. 433784 Anonymous
16th January 2020
Thursday 5:45 pm
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>>433776
It'd just me be punching down, pointing out that if they understood things like the benefits of economies of scale they probably wouldn't be paupers working such a shitty job.
>> No. 433785 Anonymous
16th January 2020
Thursday 6:04 pm
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>>433784

> the benefits of economies of scale

It's not that simple though. If we really delve into economics, and microeconomics at this point, then you could argue indeed that getting a bigger bag of chips at a bargain price means your monetary cost per serving of chips from your oven or deep fryer at home is smaller, ergo giving you a better utility to cost ratio and therefore increasing your overall utility.

But if we then factor in such things as that your freezer space at home probably isn't infinite, then you will only be able to store a limited number of frozen food bags in it. Your big bags of chips will take away some of that space, and it essentially means you will end up eating more chips because there isn't room for other frozen foods in your freezer.

With most goods we consume, marginal utility goes down the more units of it we consume. Simply put, your tenth serving of chips will not taste as good as the first one or two, i.e. your utility per additional serving of chips decreases. It might decrease to a point where the loss of marginal utility is no longer made up for by the lower retail price per serving you paid for your big bag of chips, and you will actually end up having a worse utility to cost ratio than before.

And then there's also opportunity cost to consider, because as we assumed, your freezer space is finite, and you weren't able to put other types of foods in your freezer instead of your big bags of chips, which maybe could have given you the same, or even greater utility, if just for the reason that you would have had greater variety in your diet, which most people also derive utility from.

In essence, buying things in bulk does mean less expense per serving / units consumed. But it doesn't automatically mean your overall utility increases.


Self sage, for a few reasons.
>> No. 433786 Anonymous
16th January 2020
Thursday 6:10 pm
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>>433785
Nobody is at risk of not having enough room in their freezer unless they live off turkey twizzlers and have no idea how to cook.
>> No. 433787 Anonymous
16th January 2020
Thursday 6:18 pm
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>>433786

Even if you've got a freezer the size of a compact car, its capacity is still finite, and like most people, you will have to think if there's still room for five big bags of chips when you're in Tesco's.

And that still isn't considering the fact that your income from which you can buy chips is also finite, but let's assume for a moment that money isn't your primary limiting factor when deciding between a bag of chips and a three-pack of pizza to fill your freezer with.
>> No. 433788 Anonymous
16th January 2020
Thursday 6:22 pm
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Just like to point out if you truly understood the economies of scale (and production) you'd buy a bag of spuds and cut your own chips.
>> No. 433789 Anonymous
16th January 2020
Thursday 6:25 pm
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>>433788
Alright. Pipe down, Rio.
>> No. 433790 Anonymous
16th January 2020
Thursday 7:00 pm
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I for one don't even own a freezer.
>> No. 433791 Anonymous
16th January 2020
Thursday 7:54 pm
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>>433787

One more thought -

Offering larger quantities of something at a lower price per unit of measurement is called non-linear pricing and it's one of the oldest sales tricks. People will typically jump on it because, hey, you get more for less, but the real reason it's happening is because your supermarket or manufacturer has cost structures per unit that also go down with increasing numbers or package sizes. They sell you more, which they wouldn't normally be able to do, but the numbers have also been worked out by them in their favour so that they profit more. And that's where economies of scale truly come in.

But this pricing strategy also has its limits, because you will not make people buy infinite numbers of something the further you decrease its (retail) price. Which is where utility comes back in. At some point, buying more of something because it's so cheap doesn't give you the same increase in utility as a consumer as the first few units of it that you've bought, and for your money, which is finite, other goods may offer more utility than buying or consuming the umpteenth unit of a good just because its price was very low.

That's why non-linear pricing can be quite tricky in practice, and you have to work out your numbers very carefully to ensure that your decrease in price per unit meets the kind of increase in demand that will make it profitable for you.
>> No. 433793 Anonymous
17th January 2020
Friday 1:07 am
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>>433788
If you weren't on the dole your time would be worth more than the cost of some other smegger peeling your spuds for you.
>> No. 433794 Anonymous
17th January 2020
Friday 8:37 am
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>>433793

You'll typically find that preparing and cooking your own food is considered a middle class activity, and chucking frozen chips in the oven is very much a stereotypically lower class way of operating.
>> No. 433795 Anonymous
17th January 2020
Friday 8:39 am
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>>433794
Paupers love deep frying their own chips. I don't agree with your thesis on class and chips.
>> No. 433796 Anonymous
17th January 2020
Friday 8:57 am
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>>433795

I made no mention of deep frying them.
>> No. 433797 Anonymous
17th January 2020
Friday 9:02 am
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>>433796
How else would you make your own chips?
>> No. 433798 Anonymous
17th January 2020
Friday 9:34 am
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>>433795
I for one don't even own a deep-fat fryer.
>> No. 433799 Anonymous
17th January 2020
Friday 10:00 am
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>>433798
This kind of blinkered and out of touch approach to chips personifies why Labour will be out of power for generations.

Are Nige, now that's a man who knows his way around a chip. You couldn't say the same for Thornberry or Starmer. I'm pretty sure if Nige had posed with a few black puddings we'd have had a BXP landslide.
>> No. 433800 Anonymous
17th January 2020
Friday 10:02 am
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>>433797

I put them in the oven normally. Because that way, they contain far less fat than when you deep fry them.


>>433794

>You'll typically find that preparing and cooking your own food is considered a middle class activity

Yes, and no. While paupers often don't have even the most basic knowledge about food and how to prepare it, I think that knowledge is eroding in the middle class, because people just haven't got time these days, and why go through the trouble of preparing your own food when you can get it ready made.

Friends of mine are the epitome of middle class, with all the insignia that go with it, but the woman can't cook for toffee. One time I was there for a dinner party, the steaks were pretty much scorched on the outside and bone dry on the inside. The vegetables were clearly from a frozen bag, a fact which I really had to contain myself not to address.

It really doesn't take a lot of advanced cooking skill to fry a steak so that it's done but still juicy, and it doesn't kill you to buy a bag of fresh green beans and carrots and chuck them in a pot and boil them for 15 to 20 minutes.
>> No. 433801 Anonymous
17th January 2020
Friday 10:03 am
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>>433799
Also, is that man at the back having a crafty wank at the sight of Nige and chips? That's how important fried chips are to the backbone of this nation.
>> No. 433802 Anonymous
17th January 2020
Friday 10:05 am
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>>433800
I use a microwave for my veg. Does the job for peas, carrots and broccoli at least.
>> No. 433803 Anonymous
17th January 2020
Friday 10:20 am
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>>433800
>One time I was there for a dinner party
This is the second time you've told us about this dinner party, it really made an impression on you.
>> No. 433804 Anonymous
17th January 2020
Friday 10:22 am
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>>433803

Maybe next time I'll bring you as a guest.
>> No. 433808 Anonymous
17th January 2020
Friday 5:51 pm
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I'm not too sure about this whole class thing. Take country folk for example - you've got the hole-in-shoe tramping from village to village types, then the supposed middle class types such as saville. They're both likely to have had a cow pat under their boot - the only difference is whether they call it shit or manure.

>>433800
A friend of mine is an alcoholic, semi-racist and homophobic working class person yet can cook a steak to perfection. They even do mucels and other seafoods well.
>> No. 433809 Anonymous
17th January 2020
Friday 6:34 pm
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>>433799

State of that, eating chips with a fork like a soft southern poof. Also, where's the fucking gravy?
>> No. 433810 Anonymous
17th January 2020
Friday 6:34 pm
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>>433809
I don't think I've ever had gravy on chippy chips.
>> No. 433812 Anonymous
17th January 2020
Friday 9:05 pm
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>>433808

>A friend of mine is an alcoholic, semi-racist and homophobic working class person yet can cook a steak to perfection.

It happens. I dated a chav working class lass once for a few months, and she tried to impress me one time with duck à l'orange. It was absolutely delicious, with the duck roasted to perfection and the sauce/gravy equally amazing.

She did tell me she got the recipe out of some sort of women's magazine, but naturally a good recipe is no guarantee that your dish that night will turn out well. To me at least, it took a minimum of cooking talent to end up with what she actually served me.
>> No. 433814 Anonymous
18th January 2020
Saturday 11:08 am
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>> No. 433815 Anonymous
18th January 2020
Saturday 11:12 am
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>> No. 433816 Anonymous
18th January 2020
Saturday 12:07 pm
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>> No. 433863 Anonymous
21st January 2020
Tuesday 6:10 pm
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Got my Scottish Widows annual life insurance status report in the post today. Current asset value, i.e. the amount they would pay me out if I wanted to liquidate today, is at £19,213.

Good to know that there's a plan B if I ever become proper skint.
>> No. 433864 Anonymous
21st January 2020
Tuesday 7:07 pm
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>>433863

Nice one mate :)

I got in on the Nationwide Help to Buy before expiration in November, I've got the first 1200 almost ready and it's mental knowing I'll soon have this all saved away...28 though, so I'm about a decade or more behind the sensible folk.
>> No. 433865 Anonymous
21st January 2020
Tuesday 10:08 pm
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My savings just ticked over 200k at the weekend.

Then on Monday a close friend got run over and died instantly. Could easily have been me. Should have been. I have way less to live for. He was a great guy with a family and so much good stuff to look forward to, but now he is dead because some dumb girl didn’t look where she was going. There is no justice.
>> No. 433866 Anonymous
21st January 2020
Tuesday 10:56 pm
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>>433865
Do you have a will? Who will your £200k go to if you get run over?
>> No. 433871 Anonymous
22nd January 2020
Wednesday 4:28 am
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>>433863

That's not even two months' outgoings for me. I really hope all this dosh I'm throwing at my kid's education is going to land the cunt a decent job because at this rate I'll drop dead on my morning commute some day.

>>433866
No will. Most everything over the first fifty grand is in a fund that matures when the lad hits 25. I should probably get on something that makes sure his schooling and that gets paid if I do get hit by train or my own ever-hardening arteries before then.
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