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>> No. 431786 Anonymous
28th October 2019
Monday 8:03 am
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New midweek thread: Let's enter Robot Wars edition.
154 posts omitted. Last 50 posts shown. Expand all images.
>> No. 432221 Anonymous
27th November 2019
Wednesday 10:09 am
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>>432220
I refer to .gs IRL as "this forum I post on".
>> No. 432222 Anonymous
27th November 2019
Wednesday 10:11 am
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>>432220
I knew a girl who'd tell jokes and stories she'd read on acrobat, framing them as though they were things that had happened to or been said by her friends.
>> No. 432223 Anonymous
27th November 2019
Wednesday 2:31 pm
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The chap at the Job Centre was all "why don't you want to use social media to look for work?" and while I gave him a couple of reasons I feel like I shortchanged him by forgetting about the Shamanismic State bot accounts.
>> No. 432224 Anonymous
27th November 2019
Wednesday 2:35 pm
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>>432220

>sounds a lot better than "an anonymous britfag said x"


You don't quite know that until you've tried it.

That said, I've gotten mixed responses when telling people that I post on an imageboard regularly. Places like 4chan have created a bad reputation for imageboards in general that is difficult to dispel. You kind of have to assure people that you're not a socially awkward neckbeard. Or a paedo. Or a socially awkward neckbeard paedo.
>> No. 432226 Anonymous
27th November 2019
Wednesday 2:57 pm
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>>432224
Why are you telling people at all? Even amongst friends who I’ve known for a fact visit imageboards we all in the end agreed to a Mafia-esque code of silence on the matter.
>> No. 432227 Anonymous
27th November 2019
Wednesday 3:08 pm
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>>432223

I've honestly never found a really good job based either on vacancies they informed me about, or on their tips on how to find work on your own. The last time I was really unemployed and desperately needed work, they offered me a handful of shit, dead-end temp positions, a lot of which had not that much to do with my qualifications. One time, the woman at the job centre tried to talk me into a job as a logistics agent. Which sounds kind of fancy, depending on how you lean, but it really would have involved me running up and down an unheated warehouse from about 4am every day with an iPad and crossing off outgoing shipments. The pay was shit even by temping standards.

So I took it as an incentive to start looking for work on my own. And two months later, I actually began work as an account manager, handling that company's commercial clients. I cold called the company because I remembered that an old friend once talked about one of his acquaintances working there, and when I rang them, they told me that as a matter of fact, they were currently looking for new people with a sales and/or account management background.

Job centres might help you get or stay off the dole if you've got no other choice. But they won't help you advance your career in a meaningful way when you're unemployed. The real career opportunities are always of your own making.
>> No. 432228 Anonymous
27th November 2019
Wednesday 5:35 pm
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>>432227

I've often remarked that our benefits bill would be a lot smaller if we stopped paying all those useless twats to sit behind a desk and ask other useless twats how many jobs they'd applied for that week. They're less than useless.

Then again, they're not really supposed to be there to help people like you "advance" their career. They're supposed to be there to help people who struggle to find work get into a job. I've known plenty of people who, for want of a better term, I'd definitely describe as useless. Not just lazy, not exactly disabled, just people who slipped through the cracks and ended up as a NEET, without being able to dig themselves out of it. Middle aged lads who used to work on a construction yard but can't since their back started playing up; and now they lack even the most rudimentary knowledge of how to apply for other types of job.

Those people are who the job centre should be there to help. And instead it's not. It's just full of useless admin cunts who are more of a waste of money than the benefits they're supposed to be keeping down.
>> No. 432231 Anonymous
27th November 2019
Wednesday 6:57 pm
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>>432227
Well, as a retard with no experience looking for work they've been reasonably helpful. With the exception of the very nice woman who I had my original appointment with who gave me all sorts of misleading information, but was very nice while doing it so it's hard to be too pissed off with her.
>The real career oppotunities are always of your own making.
That's more or less the advice I've been given at the Job Centre. I imagine like so many things in the world where you rely on someone in a de-facto position of authority it's dumb luck whether or not you get a bumbling nitwit, a mean-spirited malignant or in my case a normal person with a background in interviewing job candidates.

>>432228
>Not just lazy, not exactly disabled, just people who slipped through the cracks and ended up as a NEET
Do you mind if I use this on my CV?
>> No. 432237 Anonymous
28th November 2019
Thursday 12:38 pm
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>>432228

>I've often remarked that our benefits bill would be a lot smaller if we stopped paying all those useless twats to sit behind a desk and ask other useless twats how many jobs they'd applied for that week. They're less than useless.


On the other hand, doing away with them would mean that there would be even more dole fiends who can't be arsed to do even the simplest of jobs and no longer be a burden on public finances. Somebody needs to keep reminding them that they are living off other people's money for as long as they aren't back in gainful employment.

So I believe that even the most disinterested, unqualified, mean-spirited Job Centre agent still serves a purpose. You just shouldn't make the mistake of thinking they're career counsellors in a traditional sense when you've hit a bump in the road in your upwardly mobile middle management career. Most of them will be completely out of their depth when it comes to that, and yet, they will desperately and dishonestly try to appear competent.

And when I was unemployed, not only did they try to put me in that above mentioned unheated warehouse for £8 an hour (this was near enough in the middle of winter), but they also suggested I should take a course in sales management. I then told them that that was precisely what I had been doing for a living every day of the week for the past six years, but the woman only said, "Great, then that means it'll be easy for you, and you'll stay up on it". To her credit, at least it wasn't a beginner's course, but glancing at the printout she handed me, it took me less than one minute to realise that they couldn't have taught me anything that I didn't already know. I was then given the whole litany of things they could do if I was refusing to be cooperative, and the whole what-have-you. That's when I really realised that the only real way out of being unemployed was to take every bit of action all on my own.

All that said, I'm happy that for the foreseeable future, I have left the office slave world behind me and have started my own estate business. I firmly believe that I've shown that I've got the right kind of self reliance that is needed to be successful as a self-employed estate agent. My business is starting just now, but already I love the fact that I am working from home, and that I get to go to my office downstairs in my pyjama every morning, as it were. No grumpy boss, no chatty coworkers, no office politics. I'm living the dream.
>> No. 432238 Anonymous
28th November 2019
Thursday 1:09 pm
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>>432237

>You just shouldn't make the mistake of thinking they're career counsellors in a traditional sense when you've hit a bump in the road in your upwardly mobile middle management career. Most of them will be completely out of their depth when it comes to that, and yet, they will desperately and dishonestly try to appear competent.

I realise that my experience is the exception, but the job centre woman I had while I was in this position and trying to switch sectors was very good, very clever, and very supportive. Though now that I think about it she did constantly recommend me civil service jobs, presumably because she was a civil servant and lacked imagination. She was quite fit though.
>> No. 432239 Anonymous
28th November 2019
Thursday 1:31 pm
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I lived in Wales back when I was claiming benefits.

I cannot make sense of anyone's experiences here, and don't know how to respond other than with: my advisors were decidedly not clever, helpful, or fit.
>> No. 432240 Anonymous
28th November 2019
Thursday 2:23 pm
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>>432239

I was going to make the usual snide remark about Wales, but then again, my dealings were with the Job Centre here in Manchester, and it led to the experience I described above.
>> No. 432241 Anonymous
28th November 2019
Thursday 3:43 pm
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>>432237

>On the other hand, doing away with them would mean that there would be even more dole fiends who can't be arsed to do even the simplest of jobs and no longer be a burden on public finances.

Nah, I simply don't believe this is the case. Our current benefits system isn't enough to live a life of luxury, and anyone who believes people sincerely do this by choice is a dickhead.

There are people who do it because they're hopeless wastes of space, but we should let them, because having another gormless wanker behind the tills at Tesco doesn't help the economy much either. I enjoyed being dolescum briefly when I was about 23 and had all sorts of drug issues, but I was living at home with parents who worked and bought all my food. If I'd have been in a council flat making that £70 scrape out across two weeks of food and bills, I'd enjoy it a lot less.

The one exception is single mums who get given houses and enough money to look after their three kids, but then simply let the kids grow up malnourished and poorly clothed instead of spending the money on what it's meant for. But I keep getting told it's fascist of me to want the introduction of child licenses.

Those lot behind the desks cost us £5.6 billion a year.

>self-employed estate agent

Oh right, it's you again. Are you real or are you one of otherlad's roleplay characters?
>> No. 432242 Anonymous
28th November 2019
Thursday 4:21 pm
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>>432241

>Our current benefits system isn't enough to live a life of luxury, and anyone who believes people sincerely do this by choice is a dickhead


No, it's not a life of luxury, but you can scrape out a minimal living that way. It does mean you have to rely on shit, low-quality food every day and you won't have money for new clothes or amenities, but it can be done. And you'll have to do a few dodgy things on the side to raise extra money.

But with a ready supply of cheap beer and other alcohol, you'll be able to settle into that kind of life and be relatively happy with it.

At least that's what the average person will be forgiven for inferring from all the poverty porn documentaries on TV.
>> No. 432243 Anonymous
28th November 2019
Thursday 5:50 pm
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>>432242

I mean that's the thing. If you're going to spend your whole life living on that kind of diet, and the most you can look forward to is a few tinnies and fags from under the counter at the Polish shop, I don't see how you can begrudge them it.

These people are certainly costing the country a lot less than companies like Google, Amazon, Facebook et al are siphoning out of the economy every year. It's alright to pretend you object to dolescum living off somebody else's money, as if that's the real reason you dislike it, but frankly I prefer it when people just admit they hate poor people.
>> No. 432244 Anonymous
28th November 2019
Thursday 6:24 pm
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I love my girlfriend to death but last night she picked a weird place to go dogging.

She tried claiming that she, a privately educated, daughter of a reasonably well off university educated man, who will give her 70k for a house deposit (and to his other children), who also has a well off, university educated mum and sounds like she is as working class and me, a state school educated northerner, with parents with no formal qualifications.

Her rationale? I like Radio 4 in the morning and because my job is a traditionally middle class job I'm practically no different from landed gentry.

It wasn't even in an aggressive way, or a defensive way (i.e. I said she was lucky to be middle class), we just got randomly talking and she was adamant that was the case.
>> No. 432245 Anonymous
28th November 2019
Thursday 6:25 pm
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>>432244
sounds like she is, is as working class as me*
>> No. 432246 Anonymous
28th November 2019
Thursday 6:29 pm
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>>432244

Sounds like you're middle class now so she's right.
>> No. 432248 Anonymous
28th November 2019
Thursday 6:31 pm
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>>432244

>but last night she picked a weird place to go dogging

I hate when that happens. You've got to stick to the popular locations.
>> No. 432250 Anonymous
28th November 2019
Thursday 7:18 pm
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>>432244

>I love my girlfriend to death but last night she picked a weird place to go dogging.


POTFY, m4t.
>> No. 432251 Anonymous
28th November 2019
Thursday 7:32 pm
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>>432250
Agreed - I can't quite discern the beef as I think there are a couple of words missing from >>432244 rant/cry for help and what She is claiming, but as posts go, that is POTY territory on the opening line.
>> No. 432252 Anonymous
28th November 2019
Thursday 9:35 pm
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>>432251

>but as posts go, that is POTY territory on the opening line.


We should start a collection, so that zingers like that one aren't forgotten.
>> No. 432253 Anonymous
28th November 2019
Thursday 9:51 pm
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>>432252
Revengelad would only use them against us.
>> No. 432254 Anonymous
29th November 2019
Friday 12:28 am
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>>432251
It's a word filter for a phrase you lot were overusing a few months back.
>> No. 432255 Anonymous
29th November 2019
Friday 12:35 am
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>>432254
Care to shed some light?
>> No. 432256 Anonymous
29th November 2019
Friday 12:38 am
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>>432255
No but you just gave me a profound sense of deja vu.
>> No. 432258 Anonymous
29th November 2019
Friday 12:57 am
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>>432256
Care to shed some light?
>> No. 432259 Anonymous
29th November 2019
Friday 12:58 am
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>>432244

Aside from the mystery wordfilter this really could have been written by me.

You can scratch and claw to make life a a bit better for yourself, and everyone -- even people you like -- will pretend you must have been on an even footing all along. This is one of the ways that working class experience is erased.

I handle it with far less humour and grace than you seem to.
>> No. 432260 Anonymous
29th November 2019
Friday 1:31 am
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>>432259
You get angry with people who think you fit in to the place you are now?
>> No. 432262 Anonymous
29th November 2019
Friday 3:49 am
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>>432260

The point is that denying the struggle of working class folk to ascend the social hierarchy is part of the reason our class system is so entrenched and hard to escape.

Every time someone does succeed, the people who are already comfortably middle class will trivialise what it took for that person- Partly because they don't want to admit that they had a leg up, therefore diminishing their own achievement; and partly because there's a primal sense of guilt about the fact that some people simply have a harder life than others and that we're largely too selfish to meaningfully address it.

Middle class folk would prefer to turn the other cheek and focus on things that don't make them feel personally guilty. Like the environment. It gets very frustrating as someone who fought tooth and nail to get where they are, how people who got there very easily just sort of dismiss it as though it doesn't matter.

In before otherlad comes in to tell us it's dead easy if we get over our crustacean bucket mindsets and start a real estate business
>> No. 432266 Anonymous
29th November 2019
Friday 9:47 am
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>>432259
You'd rather every conversation was prefaced with 'given your working class upbringing'

"Given your working class upbringing, you're doing a great job"
"Given your working class upbringing, your kids are great"
"Given your working class upbringing, I'll have a pint, please"

The other extreme, clearly, but what do you actually want? How are people supposed to put into context something they may not even know about, probably don't care about, and something which they may see as profoundly irrelevant to the moment? They're dealing with the now-you, just as they deal with the now-everyone-else.
>> No. 432268 Anonymous
29th November 2019
Friday 10:42 am
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>>432266
I don't think he's saying that, I think what he's saying is, people are quick to play it down or make out like their much more privileged upbringing was really all no different to yours. Probably doesn't want anything, other than for people not to be obnoxious about it.

Like with my girlfriend in the original post I made, it literally changes nothing about our relationship, the evening or the practicalities of her life but she was determined to make out like I was as middle class as her or, perhaps more absurdly, she was as working class as me.

Special thanks to the mods for shitting all over my glory by pointing out it was a word filter and not my impeccable sense of humour in the first post.
>> No. 432269 Anonymous
29th November 2019
Friday 10:54 am
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>>432266
>How are people supposed to put into context something they may not even know about, probably don't care about, and something which they may see as profoundly irrelevant to the moment?

It comes out in the course of getting to know anyone. You can't be in a close relationship, for example, and not have your background become apparent. At some point you start sharing the experiences that shaped you as a person.

Even with colleagues or new faces, just politely answering questions as basic as "where do you come from" and "how did you end up working here" will sometimes lead to uncomfortable realisations for everyone, without even intending it.

The irony of your post is that it's other people that tend to notice your class, even in the "now-you". What's more, they'll bring the details out of you with questions, then downplay it and say it couldn't have been so bad since you "made it here".

About why people should care, well, why care about anyone's life? You could be close to them, you could like them, you could see it as a matter of fairness, or it could just be compassion.

As for what I want... Honestly I just want a bit of understanding from those who are close to me that I've sacrificed a lot and taken some big risks just to get to the point of material security where they started. Or some recognition that, in this particular light, they may have had some considerable advantages. It's hard to be more specific than that without bringing up real life exchanges I've had with people.
>> No. 432271 Anonymous
29th November 2019
Friday 11:52 am
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>>432266

This is a much broader and more abstract social phenomena that doesn't just come down to individual people. All he's asking for, in essence, is for middle class or otherwise more advantaged people to check their privilege. Let's pretend we're talking about race instead.

>You'd rather every conversation was prefaced with 'given the colour of your skin'

>"Given the colour of your skin, you're doing a great job"
>"Given the colour of your skin, your kids are great"
>"Given the colour of your skin, I'll have a pint, please"

Obviously no brown-eyed people have ever wanted that, but what they did want is for society at large to realise that they have a harder time of it because of the invisible systems and hierarchies of privilege. Over the last fifty or so years, we have mostly addressed those problems; but class division is still very real.
>> No. 432272 Anonymous
29th November 2019
Friday 12:11 pm
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Do you lads want some fish to go with that massive chip on your shoulder?
>> No. 432273 Anonymous
29th November 2019
Friday 12:46 pm
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>>432272
Fish!? When I were a lad we couldn't afford fish with our chippy tea.
>> No. 432280 Anonymous
29th November 2019
Friday 6:13 pm
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>>432269

>The irony of your post is that it's other people that tend to notice your class, even in the "now-you".

You'll never fully shed the markings of the social class you come from and which you grew up in. Even if you go to a posh university and make it into a boardroom somewhere, there will always be that lingering, self-perceived deficit that you feel you have because you didn't grow up the same way as your present-day peers who came from money.

In the end, it's a matter of debate if people really consciously point out class differences between their upbringing and yours to you, or if it's just you being hypervigilant and getting defensive even at the slightest hint of it, because instinctively you know you'll never fully be one of "them".



https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EMVqIISyp60
>> No. 432281 Anonymous
29th November 2019
Friday 7:22 pm
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>>43228
>In the end, it's a matter of debate if people really consciously point out class differences between their upbringing and yours to you

That's not what I was saying. What I pointed out was that people ask me questions, I give them factual answers (e.g., no I didn't receive sums of money when I reached big life milestones, yes I do have immediate relatives who have been to prison, yes there were times money was very tight as a child, no I'm not set to inherit anything), then them deliberately attempting to underplay the factual answers I give them. I've had people erase the first twenty-odd years of my life because I've got to a decent place.

I'm not hoping to "blend in", and I don't perceive myself as inferior because of my upbringing. What I would like is for people not to dismiss my experiences, especially when they're the ones that ask about them. These seem like such different things that I'm not even sure you really read my post.
>> No. 432283 Anonymous
29th November 2019
Friday 8:42 pm
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>>432281

>no I didn't receive sums of money when I reached big life milestones

Neither did I, and I'm from an upper middle class upbringing myself.


>yes I do have immediate relatives who have been to prison

Not going to argue that poverty and prison don't correlate, but I dated a lass briefly whose uncle was a tax lawyer, and at that time, he was in prison somewhere in the Caribbean (some tax haven that I can't remember the name of) for money laundering, awaiting extradition to Britain. Yes, I know, that's not the same as some dolescum thug going to prison for nicking cars because he doesn't know any better, but my point is, it's not something that only happens to poorer people.


>no I'm not set to inherit anything

Even if you are, that doesn't mean you'll always have it. A lot of those trust fund rich kids, I mean the really rich ones, run out of money before they know what hit them, because they never had to work for money and thus never appreciated it and realised that you need to take good care of it or you'll just piss it away.


>and I don't perceive myself as inferior because of my upbringing

And you aren't. I know a few people who came from humble beginnings, and some are the nicest human beings you'll meet.
>> No. 432287 Anonymous
29th November 2019
Friday 9:48 pm
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If I buy an old Ordnance Survey map like this will it be something I'd be able to open out and frame or would it be like a book across a number of pages? Thinking of ordering one as a present for someone.
>> No. 432288 Anonymous
29th November 2019
Friday 11:53 pm
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>>432287

It'll be a fold-out sheet, but the size depends on the type of map.

https://maps.nls.uk/orders-sizes.html
>> No. 432289 Anonymous
30th November 2019
Saturday 4:33 am
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>>432283
>it's not something that only happens to poorer people.

All of this happens on sliding scale with socioeconomic status, as shown by decades of research. It's not that it doesn't happen to middle class people, it's that it happens less frequently, or happens differently due to having the protection a bit of money or education provides.

I was just giving examples of questions that have led to awkward conversations with people I know. Some even try to joke about it, as though to make a point how far removed my experiences are from theirs. As another poster pointed out, it does get obnoxious.

Regardless, I suspected it was a bad idea, precisely because someone like you always pops up and points out an exception and ignores the overwhelming evidence for things as simple as: middle class kids tend to benefit more from intergenerational exchange of wealth, they tend to have fewer relatives in prison, they tend to be in better health, they tend to be more educated, they tend to have a better grasp of how to navigate institutions, they tend to be better connected to other middle class folk, etc..

These tendencies have been reflected prettyy accurately, in my experience, even though anyone can think of exceptions -- of which I'm probably one.
>> No. 432291 Anonymous
30th November 2019
Saturday 5:36 am
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>>432288
Thanks, lad. I've had a look online and it says the Alan Godfrey maps generally cover one and a half miles by one mile, at a scale of 15 inches to the mile.
>> No. 432292 Anonymous
30th November 2019
Saturday 9:07 am
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>>432283
>Even if you are, that doesn't mean you'll always have it. A lot of those trust fund rich kids, I mean the really rich ones, run out of money before they know what hit them, because they never had to work for money and thus never appreciated it and realised that you need to take good care of it or you'll just piss it away.

Sorry but this is untrue. I think maybe you're thinking of lottery winners? If I were wealthy I'd want people to believe this was the case but the facts are two thirds of all wealth is inherited. Most rich people were simply given most of their money and the richer you are the more likely this is to be the case.
>> No. 432293 Anonymous
30th November 2019
Saturday 9:41 am
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>>432288
Yeah - I've got quite a few of those older OS maps. They are nice things (I collect maps BTW) but they're not quite at the level you could flatten and frame them. You can sometimes find map shops that have flattened them for you.
>> No. 432296 Anonymous
30th November 2019
Saturday 11:32 am
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>>432287

Alan Godfrey Maps offer some of their colour prints as a flat sheet, posted rolled up in a tube - you could try giving them a ring on 01207 583388 and ask if they can do others like that.
>> No. 432297 Anonymous
30th November 2019
Saturday 11:45 am
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>>432289

You're not wrong, in that there is a divide between the poor and the middle class that is difficult to overcome, and getting more difficult in our time, it seems:


https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/education-44489556

>For those people born between 1955 and 1975, the research says, social mobility was a "reality", with people born into low-income families able to move up in terms of education and earnings.

>But the OECD study suggests that those born afterwards, becoming adults in the 1990s and later, faced "stagnating" social mobility.

>Researchers found a high likelihood of people being "stuck" in the income group into which they were born, with those born into poorer families likely to remain poor and those from high-income families going on to become high earners themselves.
>> No. 432298 Anonymous
30th November 2019
Saturday 3:12 pm
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>>432297
Bring back grammar schools.
>> No. 432299 Anonymous
30th November 2019
Saturday 4:01 pm
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>>432293
Is that because of creasing? If so then I'd imagine ironing them on the lowest setting underneath a few pillowcases or tea towels could sort that out.
>> No. 432300 Anonymous
30th November 2019
Saturday 4:32 pm
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>>432299

Tea towel with just a touch of steam at the lowest heat setting and you should be golden. But make sure you allow the spots you're ironing to cool down in between passes.

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