[ rss / options / help ]
post ]
[ b / iq / g / zoo ] [ e / news / lab ] [ v / nom / pol / eco / emo / 101 / shed ]
[ art / A / beat / boo / com / fat / job / lit / map / mph / poof / £$€¥ / spo / uhu / uni / x / y ] [ * | sfw | o ]
logo
random

Return ] Entire Thread ] First 100 posts ] Last 50 posts ]

Posting mode: Reply [Last 50 posts]
Reply ]
Subject   (reply to 431786)
Message
File  []
close
BP980882.jpg
431786431786431786
>> No. 431786 Anonymous
28th October 2019
Monday 8:03 am
431786 spacer
New midweek thread: Let's enter Robot Wars edition.
688 posts omitted. Last 50 posts shown. Expand all images.
>> No. 434414 Anonymous
16th February 2020
Sunday 12:11 pm
434414 spacer
>>434398

Lloyyd Grossman ones are nice. I can knock up an excellent pasta sauce myself, but I bet if I served up two lasagnes and one of them was a Lloyyd Grossman jarred sauce you wouldn't taste the difference.

The point is jarred sauces are more expensive than its worth when Italian food is so easy to do yourself. Italian lads are arguing on the wrong point if they think it's because jarred sauces taste inferior. They don't, because again, it's piss easy to make. Therefore piss easy to manufacture a jarred product out of.
>> No. 434415 Anonymous
16th February 2020
Sunday 12:41 pm
434415 spacer
>>434414

>The point is jarred sauces are more expensive than its worth when Italian food is so easy to do yourself

Say a jar of ready made, brand name tomato sauce for pasta is £2 or thereabouts.

A tin of tomatoes is around 75p, again depending on the brand. A 1 kg bag of onions is £1. Carrots, 75p. Garlic, 50p. White wine, 125ml bottle, £2. Bag of bell pepper, 80p. Various herbs and spices, let's say £2. Yes, not all of your onions or your bell pepper or your herbs will go into one dish of pasta, but if you haven't got them in your home already, you'll have to buy them nonetheless.

And then you've got the opportunity cost of the time it takes you to make pasta sauce from scratch. Difficult to quantify, but relevant nonetheless.

From a cost-utility standpoint, it's fully reasonable for many people to buy a jar of pasta sauce, and maybe not have the satisfaction of having made your own sauce, just because you can.
>> No. 434416 Anonymous
16th February 2020
Sunday 12:50 pm
434416 spacer
>>434414
Are you serious? If you can't taste the difference between a jar of sauce and one you've cooked yourself then you're really only insulting your own ability one way or the other. Especially if you're using fresh tomatoes, it would be impossible not to notice.
>> No. 434417 Anonymous
16th February 2020
Sunday 1:00 pm
434417 spacer
>>434416

Not him, but yes, you clearly notice the difference, and if you can't, you're just completely shit at cooking in the first place.

But still, if you can't be arsed to make your own pasta sauce, there are decent ready made alternatives. It's all a question of how much effort you're prepared to put into your pasta dish. Some people even swear by freshly made noodles from fresh dough and won't eat dry pasta.

If all you want is a cheap and quick way to fill up your stomach, then why not buy dry spaghetti for 35p and a jar of Tesco spaghetti sauce for 75p. A whole dinner for just over a quid, with minimal effort.
>> No. 434418 Anonymous
16th February 2020
Sunday 1:16 pm
434418 spacer
>>434415

You can buy onions and carrots individually, you know. Enough to make the equivalent volume of a dolmio jar is more like 30p for both.

I also don't get the "you need to have ingredient to make stuff" argument, when you're listing a load of basic ingredients that anyone who cooks their own food is all but guaranteed to have. The point only makes sense if you don't actually ever cook your own food and live out of jars and tins.

And prep time on a single onion, half a carrot and three cloves of garlic is so laughable I refuse to acknowledge it as a time cost.

>>434417

>If all you want is a cheap and quick way to fill up your stomach

Sounds depressing, especially when it takes four minutes of prep to make your own sauce. I appreciate it still takes 30-40 minutes to cook a tomato sauce, but it's not like you have to hover over it. I suppose if you need spaghetti in an emergency, like ten minutes from now, jar is a good way to go, but otherwise seems a poor choice.
>> No. 434419 Anonymous
16th February 2020
Sunday 1:26 pm
434419 spacer
>>434416

>Especially if you're using fresh tomatoes, it would be impossible not to notice.

99% of fresh tomatoes in this country are shite, even in season. "Fresh" counts for nowt if it's a hard, bland, watery tomato grown in a Spanish polytunnel with the sole aim of looking pretty on a shelf for as long as possible. You're better off with quality tinned tomatoes.

>>434417

>Some people even swear by freshly made noodles from fresh dough and won't eat dry pasta.

Those people would be twats. There's a strong argument for fresh egg pasta, but plain wheat pasta loses nothing from being dried. Home-made wheat pasta will usually be worse than a quality brand of dried pasta unless you know exactly what you're doing and you've got access to top-quality semolina.
>> No. 434422 Anonymous
16th February 2020
Sunday 1:33 pm
434422 spacer
>>434419

> Those people would be twats. There's a strong argument for fresh egg pasta, but plain wheat pasta loses nothing from being dried. Home-made wheat pasta will usually be worse than a quality brand of dried pasta unless you know exactly what you're doing and you've got access to top-quality semolina.


You underestimate the food snobbery of some food snobs. I personally know people who will even look down on you if you bought a budget £19 pasta machine and not a top of the line one imported from Italy.

That said, my £19 pasta machine didn't last as long as I had hoped.
>> No. 434423 Anonymous
16th February 2020
Sunday 1:39 pm
434423 spacer
>>434419

With you on the poly tomatoes thing, though it's not impossible to find good ones, a tin of san marzano or similar is always going to be better than even the good (usually dutch) tomatoes that do end up here at a premium. I like "red egg" tomatoes but I've never seen them outside of a catering pallet.

And of fresh pasta, for many applications, dried is better. Fresh pasta simply doesn't work well with a heavier sauce and might even disintegrate in the pan. And even for simpler sauces, or the simplest like Aglio e Olio, you need the bite that dried pasta gives you. There's still certainly such a thing as 'better' dried pasta, the nice rough bronze die stuff, but at that point we're talking about elevating a dish as much as possible, aiming for 'the best' over 'very very nice'
>> No. 434424 Anonymous
16th February 2020
Sunday 1:42 pm
434424 spacer

KTC-Chopped-Tomatoes.jpg
434424434424434424
>>434415
>Say a jar of ready made, brand name tomato sauce for pasta is £2 or thereabouts.
>A tin of tomatoes is around 75p, again depending on the brand. A 1 kg bag of onions is £1. Carrots, 75p. Garlic, 50p. White wine, 125ml bottle, £2. Bag of bell pepper, 80p. Various herbs and spices, let's say £2.

Are these Waitrose prices or something? I can get KTC chopped tomatoes in Lidl for 28p and that's the way I roll. I'm not made of money.
>> No. 434425 Anonymous
16th February 2020
Sunday 1:45 pm
434425 spacer
>>434424

I did say "depending on the brand".
>> No. 434426 Anonymous
16th February 2020
Sunday 1:48 pm
434426 spacer

tomatos.jpg
434426434426434426
Fried onions and garlic, into a pot with freshly chopped tomatoes and a litle oil. Salt and pepper to taste. Cover to steam and soften. When done, pour over cooked pasta.
Improve this simple recipe? Sometimes i'll do it all in the frying pan, which reduces the water content a lot. Sometimes i add tomato paste, which tends to thicken the texture and flavour. Occasionally i do something like this in a covered baking dish but the last couple of times i've tried they turned out awful - i think i used the wrong tinned toms.

>>434424
These were the cheapest tinned tomatoes in my local co-op, until they realised people would buy them from the asian section rather than the doubly expensive 'italian' tomatoes in the ingredients isle. KTE are still cheaper buy only by a few pence per 100g >:(
>> No. 434427 Anonymous
16th February 2020
Sunday 1:48 pm
434427 spacer
>>434425
I'll let you off this time, but I'm wary of you out of touch liberal elites who don't know how much things like a bottle of milk cost for ordinary working folk.
>> No. 434428 Anonymous
16th February 2020
Sunday 1:49 pm
434428 spacer
>>434424

Even the 'premium' napolina ones are I think £1.50 for four tins.

Anyway, if you've ever eaten a tomato based pasta dish at any restaurant, italian or otherwise, that didn't explicitly name the tomatoes they used on the menu, then 99% certainty you've had KTC tomatoes.
>> No. 434430 Anonymous
16th February 2020
Sunday 1:59 pm
434430 spacer
>>434427

I'm sorry. It might be because I don't really buy tinned tomatoes. My pasta tomato sauce, when I make one from fresh ingredients, usually consists of triple concentrated tomato puree (which I can tell you is between 50p and £1 for a 200g tube) and fresh tomatoes. I don't really like tinned tomatoes as such, their consistence can be too squishy. I like the "bite" of fresh tomatoes in my pasta sauce.
>> No. 434431 Anonymous
16th February 2020
Sunday 2:13 pm
434431 spacer
>>434430
Next you'll be telling me you've never used tomato soup as a pasta sauce.
>> No. 434434 Anonymous
16th February 2020
Sunday 2:33 pm
434434 spacer
>>434431
I am definitely being triggered by this post.
>> No. 434435 Anonymous
16th February 2020
Sunday 2:37 pm
434435 spacer
What is that background flavour in tomato soup and tinned tomatoes caused by? It's not necessarily unpleasant, just very particular.
>> No. 434436 Anonymous
16th February 2020
Sunday 2:39 pm
434436 spacer
>>434428

>KTC


>> No. 434437 Anonymous
16th February 2020
Sunday 3:24 pm
434437 spacer

IMG_6112_1024x1024.jpg
434437434437434437
>>434430
It's worth spending the extra and getting some San Marzano tinned tomatoes; they taste way better than the normal ones.
>> No. 434438 Anonymous
16th February 2020
Sunday 3:46 pm
434438 spacer

Tomato-Meatball-Soup-1-11-copy.jpg
434438434438434438
>>434434
Tomato soup with pasta is objectively better than using a jar of Dolmio or whatever.
>> No. 434439 Anonymous
16th February 2020
Sunday 3:51 pm
434439 spacer
>>434434

I have, on more than one occasion, dumped a can of cream of chicken soup into spaghetti and ate that.
>> No. 434440 Anonymous
16th February 2020
Sunday 5:37 pm
434440 spacer
>>434438

Fuck you and fuck your awful dinner.

>>434439

Have some self respect, man. Lightly fry a clove of finely chopped garlic in a generous amount of olive oil, add some chilli flakes, toss it through your spaghetti and you've got a perfectly serviceable aglio e olio. Some tinned tomatoes simmered for ten minutes with a splash of olive oil make a fine pomodoro sauce; add a little fresh basil or pecorino if you have it. In both cases, cook the spaghetti to slightly firmer than al dente and finish cooking it in the sauce.

Authentic Italian cooking is for the most part incredibly simple. There's a significant element of practice and precision required to do things just right, but you get most of the way there by doing the simplest thing with the fewest ingredients. A tin of chicken soup does not constitute an ingredient.
>> No. 434441 Anonymous
16th February 2020
Sunday 6:08 pm
434441 spacer
>If you can't taste the difference between a jar of sauce and one you've cooked yourself then you're really only insulting your own ability

>you clearly notice the difference, and if you can't, you're just completely shit at cooking in the first place.

Honestly I think both of you are overestimating your tastes and ability to distinguish things.

Fair enough if I made you a bowl of plain pasta with nothing but a sauce, and one was a from scratch with sun dried tomatoes and fresh basil and so on, while the other one was Aldi's cheapest jar of regular "tomato sauce"... You would be able to tell. But if I made you something with one of the flashier sachets that come with chunks of real veg and a decent amount of seasoning, I think you'd actually struggle to identify them properly.

When you get to a higher quality level of ready-made food it isn't always worse, just different. And frankly, the fact that you're snobs who obviously never use jarred sauces means you have no idea how they actually taste, doesn't it?

I mean it's tomatoes, a bit of onion, garlic and herbs, lads. There's only so much of a depth of flavour possible when you're dealing with elemental basics like that. Even jarred sauces can get it right.
>> No. 434442 Anonymous
16th February 2020
Sunday 6:11 pm
434442 spacer
>>434440
> add a little fresh basil or pecorino if you have it.
What kind of animal wouldn't have such things just lying about!
>> No. 434444 Anonymous
16th February 2020
Sunday 6:36 pm
434444 spacer

50436011_0_640x640.jpg
434444434444434444
>>434440
>Fuck you and fuck your awful dinner.

The only way I could possibly accept any part of this would be if the tomato soup was made fresh; which is also a piss easy thing to learn to do and a thousand times better for it. Tomato, onions, vegetable stock and a small potato.

>>434441
You are just wrong; people who have been brought up on this kind of food (ie Mediterraneans) absolutely know what fresh and what bottled tastes like and can identify it triple blind - we eat the tomato based dishes so much. We also have jarred sauces - we use those on weekdays to feed the kids or throw on a pizza or when we don't have time to do it right.

>>434419
Garafalo or De Cecco far exceed the quality of most fresh pasta people see in supermarkets. Some of the things that pass as ravioli / fresh are just criminal in my eyes - they taste nothing like the fresh / scratch article.
>> No. 434445 Anonymous
16th February 2020
Sunday 6:41 pm
434445 spacer
>>434444

>people who have been brought up on this kind of food

I can concede that, but I'm still wagering your average gobshite on Britfa couldn't.
>> No. 434446 Anonymous
16th February 2020
Sunday 6:47 pm
434446 spacer

zNToTX9qQvWXqT6IQnXm_IMG_20190121_175048.jpg
434446434446434446
>>434444
Nope. One packet of conchiglie pasta with a couple of tins of cream of tomato soup. Sprinkle on a bit of cheese and it's ultimate comfort food. Minestrone, but not shit.
>> No. 434447 Anonymous
16th February 2020
Sunday 6:52 pm
434447 spacer

s-l1600.jpg
434447434447434447
Some of the assertions in this thread have angered me so much I went shopping on eBay to recover and have just discovered all Jamie's industrial pasta machines for sale.

Thinking of artisan hipster business.
>> No. 434448 Anonymous
16th February 2020
Sunday 6:58 pm
434448 spacer

Janeane-Garofalo1.jpg
434448434448434448
>>434442

>What kind of animal wouldn't have such things just lying about!

This kind of monster - >>434446

>>434444

>Garafalo

If you have a Costco membership (or know someone who can give you a guest pass), they have Garofalo pasta for less than a quid a packet.
>> No. 434449 Anonymous
16th February 2020
Sunday 7:02 pm
434449 spacer

50584011_0_640x640.jpg
434449434449434449
>>434448
>If you have a Costco membership

DO THEY NOW. I have been trying to find an excuse to get a membership as we have one nearby and was worried they wouldn't have much I like, going by their website. BUT NOW.
>> No. 434450 Anonymous
16th February 2020
Sunday 7:03 pm
434450 spacer
>>434441

>There's only so much of a depth of flavour possible when you're dealing with elemental basics like that

You've given yourself away here, as depth of flavour is exactly what you get when you actually cook tomatoes and aromatics in a pan then serve it immediately. And that's the point - if I made my "snob sauce" with finest ingredients, put it in a jar then gave it to you days, weeks, months later, it would not be as good. Even with modern methods, flavours die in glass jars and even tins. This is why tinned tomatoes come raw, you're supposed to cook them, and all those ingredients cooked on that day will always, always have more depth than a dolmio that was cooked a significant time ago, and this is just one of the many elements of production vs home food, but it's the most important one IMO.

I'm sorry to rant like this, I don't even care about pasta sauce, Italians ARE snobby cunts, but I've put too much of my life into cooking to disagree with them here.
>> No. 434451 Anonymous
16th February 2020
Sunday 7:09 pm
434451 spacer

Gesto_ma-che-cazzo.jpg
434451434451434451
>>434450

>Italians ARE snobby cunts
>> No. 434452 Anonymous
16th February 2020
Sunday 7:11 pm
434452 spacer
>>434440

Chicken soup spaghetti man here. I appreciate your suggestions, but I definitely know how to cook, I am a cheflad.

Doesn't mean cream of chicken and pasta isn't fucking delicious. This was before Heinz changed the recipe though. I'd take it over jarred tomato sauce any day.

Actually, that's another good point - fatty or creamy sauces hold up far better under storage than the relatively delicate oils of your average tomato sauce. I don't think anyone would be arguing quite as much about using a jar of bechamel, as the jarred stuff remains a lot closer to handmade, in flavour at least. The texture may never be quite right, though not as detectably so.
>> No. 434453 Anonymous
16th February 2020
Sunday 7:24 pm
434453 spacer
>>434452
Soup as a pasta sauce: endorsed by chefs.

That's all I needed to know on the matter.
>> No. 434454 Anonymous
16th February 2020
Sunday 7:29 pm
434454 spacer
>>434453

Chefs eat some shit.

We know what good food tastes like, but everything is good food after a 14 hour shift. I would still rather have chicken soup pasta than jarred sauce.

Haven't tried your fucked up tomato soup method but my mam did used to make 'cheesy pasta' which was basically cream of tomato and shredded cheese mixed into pasta. But even she had the temerity to fry some fucking onions and garlic and sometimes bacon in the pan before the can of soup went in. The fat of the cheese probably helped a lot there, I'm imagining the soup pasta to be far too sweet otherwise.
>> No. 434455 Anonymous
16th February 2020
Sunday 7:43 pm
434455 spacer
>>434454
>We know what good food tastes like, but everything is good food after a 14 hour shift.

Agreed. Not every meal can be gourmet. When I get home from work it takes an untold effort to make something with more than two colours in it.
>> No. 434462 Anonymous
16th February 2020
Sunday 9:12 pm
434462 spacer
>>434455
Surely that's universal? I care about my craft for a client/bill payer, but if I do it for myself? I do good enough. I don't have the money and time to do for myself that is expected of me.
>> No. 434463 Anonymous
16th February 2020
Sunday 9:45 pm
434463 spacer
>>434455

I've always meant to ask - what does a cheflad cook for himself when he gets home, or on his day off? Do you tend to get take away and enjoy the fact that you don't have to cook that day, or does your professional pride extend into your personal life and you still make an effort to whip something up?
>> No. 434465 Anonymous
16th February 2020
Sunday 11:15 pm
434465 spacer
>>434463

>Do you tend to get take away and enjoy the fact that you don't have to cook that day, or does your professional pride extend into your personal life and you still make an effort to whip something up?

It can go both ways. Usually it's the takeaway route, the last thing you want to do after work is cook another fucking meal. Days off, it sort of depends on your motivation. You have the ability to chuck something really nice together with whatever you happen to have in the cupboards, so that can happen, because it is really very easy and you're almost on autopilot, but finding the strength and motivation to pick up a knife on your day off can be a real challenge.

Another factor is you're often just not that hungry - you taste food all day, and have constant access to it, so you either end up filling up on shift or being put off the very idea of eating anyway. Most common after work meal was beer and drugs.

On days off, it really just depends how much effort you can muster. When I lived with other chefs and we had days off we'd usually make something, typically a stew or pizzas (we had a pizza stone and a good oven) or store cupboard pasta. It's very, very quick and easy for a couple of chefs to make something like that. We'd never half arse it - we simply couldn't, it's beaten out of you very early on - but we'd make stuff that didn't really ever require a whole arse to be good in the first place. I don't believe any professional chef has ever made, say, a souffle at home. If they have, they need sectioned.

Italian and Japanese food was what I'd lean towards when cooking solo, as it's really easy to make a very, very good carbonara or donburi very quickly on your own. I would try and push myself to eat proper food and the rice cooker was a crutch. Some sort of meat and/or veg simmered in a sauce with loads of flavour on some perfect fluffy rice doesn't really ever get old, same with three or four ingredient pasta. A working chef's fridge is usually just eggs, butter, lots of jars of odd pickled stuff and cured meats. Then you'd just buy some meat and veg whenever you felt like actually cooking. You learn quickly a weekly shop is pointless, you will never cook meals on any sort of schedule or regularity at home.

When I was a cheflad living with a girlfriend it was a little better - we ended up with the agreement that I'd do all the prep and she'd do the rest. So I'd just chop all the shit up and leave her to it. That was great, people often express nervousness at cooking for a chef but any food I don't have to fucking cook is going to be appreciated, believe me.

Now I'm mostly out of the catering game, I find myself watching Youtube channels about cooking and trying stuff at home in a way I never did, even when working in menu development - there was always a clear delineation between work and home cooking, I never even thought of attempting to workshop a recipe at home, but now I watch shit like Bon Appetit and go make 6 hour ragu and all of that. It's almost, almost to the point where it's just a hobby, and I think I enjoy it more now.
>> No. 434466 Anonymous
17th February 2020
Monday 3:10 pm
434466 spacer
>>434465

>Another factor is you're often just not that hungry - you taste food all day, and have constant access to it, so you either end up filling up on shift or being put off the very idea of eating anyway.

One of my exes worked at McDonald's for a while, and at the end of a late shift, they'd often sit down together and eat the stuff that was left over from the end of the shift and that they otherwise would have had to throw away. Almost kind of like a team bonding exercise. It blew my mind that she still had an appetite for cheeseburgers after being around the stuff the whole evening, but apparently during a shift you really didn't get a chance to eat anything at all, naturally not while you were standing in the kitchen area and customers would have seen you munch on a burger (I think behaviour guidelines expressly said not to do that), but also, during your periodic five-minute breaks, you were just glad to get to go outside and have a fag or smell the fresh air. The most you'd ever eat would have been a Mars bar.

The downside of that job was that she often smelled of chips and burgers from head to toe when she got home. And sweat, but mainly chips and burgers. Kind of a turnoff, so she usually had a shower first before we went on to have any sex that evening.
>> No. 434467 Anonymous
17th February 2020
Monday 3:16 pm
434467 spacer
>>434466
>she often smelled of chips and burgers from head to toe when she got home
>Kind of a turnoff

Speak for your-bloody-self, you were living the dream m7.
>> No. 434469 Anonymous
17th February 2020
Monday 3:36 pm
434469 spacer

yesineedtocleanmywindows.jpg
434469434469434469
Ran out of space on the windowsill to propagate things on so I've kludged some "shelves" up. Might look like shit but they're stable enough and once I put a middle bit in I'll have doubled the space available. Can do the same with all the other windows in the house too.
>> No. 434470 Anonymous
17th February 2020
Monday 3:36 pm
434470 spacer
>>434468

What are you propagating at the moment then?

My chili pepper plants are doing well, still in the propagator, but they're two inches tall now. Probably ready to put in individual pots in two or three weeks.
>> No. 434471 Anonymous
17th February 2020
Monday 5:08 pm
434471 spacer
Nae one gives a fuck, but I just heard someone playing Halo: Reach on the BBC's Global News Podcast and it was the most delightful thing. They didn't mention it by name, but I'd know that music anywhere.
>> No. 434476 Anonymous
17th February 2020
Monday 6:22 pm
434476 spacer
>>434470
That's a couple of varieties of succulent, tomatoes, tomatilloes, physalis* cucumber, orange trees*, Sichuan pepper plant* and three varieties of chilli.
* Haven't germinated yet and I'm not convinced all of them will at all. I want to add some brassica, herbs and maybe other varieties of tomato and cucumber. I think my chillies are about the same stage as yours. I'll have to build a hot box in the garden for them special.
>> No. 434479 Anonymous
17th February 2020
Monday 7:24 pm
434479 spacer
>>434476

>succulent

I've got a cactus or two, and also, I once brought home a mother-of-thousands from a holiday in Greece, of which I still have daughter plants.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bryophyllum_daigremontianum

They are considered a nuisance in warmer climates, and you can't normally buy them at garden centres here, because with all the plantlets attached to the leaves that will come off if you just slightly brush against them, they have a habit of spreading profusely. But they're fine to plant in your back garden in summer here in the UK, because a single crisp night of frost will kill them dead.


Self sage for pointless old-man rambling.
>> No. 434488 Anonymous
17th February 2020
Monday 9:19 pm
434488 spacer
>>434479
Those sound like a hassle. I have about 24 now but they're mainly very slow growers and more than half are under four months old so not much bigger than a lemon pip.
>> No. 434490 Anonymous
17th February 2020
Monday 10:14 pm
434490 spacer
>>434471
I heard Mass Effect's map screen music on a BBC show about space or mars or something and was more excited than I should've been.


>> No. 434491 Anonymous
17th February 2020
Monday 10:21 pm
434491 spacer
>>434488

I'm thinking about germinating tomatoes once the chilis are out of my propagator. I've also still got red kuri squash seeds here, found them again the other day, but they must be well over ten years old from when I last grew a batch of them, so I'm not sure if they're still good. I can't really say I'm fond of kuri anyway, squash and pumpkin always has kind of a "meh" taste to me, it'd be much more fun to grow and cultivate than to actually eat.
>> No. 434492 Anonymous
17th February 2020
Monday 11:19 pm
434492 spacer
>>434491
It's worth a try with your squashes but tomatoes are quite satisfying to grow. Just make sure you have some sort of trellis or something for them to grow up. You may find yourself having to tie them up continually to it.

Return ] Entire Thread ] First 100 posts ] Last 50 posts ]
whiteline

Delete Post []
Password